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  4. That pretty much says it all for spraying except you should have mentioned you are going with minimum fuel and maximum product! They like to call that stuff in the spray tank by the term product!
  5. onemorepilot

    Funny stuff you said or heard.

    Not exactly a flying story but a pilot story... When talking about the somewhat new laws about texting and driving, a fellow spray pilot once said, "I operate 11 switches with my right thumb while flying a helicopter within ten feet of obstacles in a 3d environment at 60 mph while holding my track within 3 feet. Don't tell me I can't figure out how to text and drive."
  6. Diaper_Pin

    Wires Again

    Pilots chatting on their phones while flying. A few good stories there....
  7. A fitting outcome 😝
  8. onemorepilot

    Pilot/Mechanic Relationship

    Agreed. There are definitely some bad ones out there. And you kind of have to be half nus to want to be in this business so the deck is already stacked badly.
  9. Heliian

    Pilot/Mechanic Relationship

    Sometimes it's learning, sometimes it's babysitting. A good engineer will have a good repore with the drivers, easy as that. However, there are several nutjob pilots out there who are just a nightmare to deal with. Most don't last but there's always going to be a few.
  10. onemorepilot

    UH-1 Drag Brace

    Interesting interpretation of of ICC requirements. The part that caught my attention is "I always have the second set of eyes check it. It's how I was taught." We live in a world that requires us to sign off and do things by the book but as experienced mechanics we also know what is important. As a footnote, I have also been a certified mechanic for as long as I've been flying. I have always refused to do my own inspections in the field. My reasoning is that I look at it every day. At inspection time, I want the second set of eyes.
  11. GrayHorizons

    UH-1 Drag Brace

    Part V - Standard 571 - Types of Work (d) Work that disturbs engine or flight controls ....accomplished, by at least two persons...etc While drag braces and mast nuts are debatable as being a flight control, and an ICC is perhaps not required for them, its still not a bad idea to perform one yourself as the pilot as it is your sense of safety that is important. I have always had the second set of eyes check out the installation, its how I was taught. My reasoning on them being debatable falls in it's most basic form. once installed and safetied, they are now a fixed item, that do not move as a flight control by the input of a pilot. Is that the best answer? no, would it hold up in court? who knows really. regardless, beyond that interpretation, it falls into check lists from the maintenance manuals. I don't have any Bell stuff on hand so I can't reference them, but what I do see for semi equivalent parts on an AS350 is that you're signing for the starflex bolt installations and for the safetying of them under chapter 62 as those steps are specific. Not much different than a mast nut and lock or a drag damper I'm assuming, there may be disagreement. So the engineer who checked them off as complete is taking responsibility for that task. Pitch links on a 350 are clearly a flight control to me, but they are also under chapter 62. They too have specific instructions on torque and safety.
  12. onemorepilot

    UH-1 Drag Brace

    We've gotten off the original topic of the drag brace so I started another thread about the new discussion.
  13. onemorepilot

    Pilot/Mechanic Relationship

    This is an extension of the UH-1 Drag Brace topic, but it seems appropriate to start a new thread about it. In the other thread there was talk of ICC requirements and "company critical task lists", etc. GrayHorizons is right when he says that human factors are complex when it comes to maintenance slips. In my mind no amount of regulation or company policy will substitute for an experienced, conscientious professional pilot/mechanic team. I want to point out that this is not mechanic bashing. Pilots should be judged just as critically. To me, it is about confidence. Here is what I mean: As mechanics, you have to fly occasionally (test flights, rotor smoothing, etc). When you get in with a new pilot, in the back of your mind you wonder if you should trust this guy. But you have no choice so you go. As you work with him he either gains your confidence or he becomes the pilot that nobody wants to fly with. Most of the time that confidence is a gut feeling (unless he does something blatantly stupid.) You make your judgements about this new pilot by watching how he handles himself. Does he walk around the aircraft before he gets in? (No legal requirement for that.) Does he yank it off the pad or is he smooth and deliberate? These observations will build or destroy the confidence that you have in a pilot. A worthy pilot recognizes that at that moment he is responsible for the safety of his mechanic. Pilots judge mechanics in the same way: Does he keep his tools neat or does he have to root through a pile of parts from three different aircraft to find what he's looking for? Is he methodical and confident in how he works or does his mind seem to be all over the place? Does he tell the pilot that everything is ready to go or does he say "I worked on this, this and this. Look them over and you're ready to go"? A worthy mechanic recognizes that at that moment he is responsible for safety of his pilot. There is no room for pilot/mechanic rivalry and blame. Mistakes will be made on both sides from time to time because we are human. We need to work through that as professionals without blaming and finger pointing. Pilots and mechanics have very different jobs but each is required to earn the respect (and trust) of the other.
  14. onemorepilot

    UH-1 Drag Brace

    ...and we're still hung up debating the legal issue.
  15. onemorepilot

    UH-1 Drag Brace

    Don't want to waste the space qoting the whole post but 6/13/18 "Tang, bolt and nut we're in place... Finger tight... Found on preflight"
  16. SwingWing

    UH-1 Drag Brace

    Unable to determine when that discrepancy was discovered from reading previous post.
  17. SwingWing

    UH-1 Drag Brace

    No legal requirement for ICC on 206 mast nut. I don’t make the rules. That is what I wrote right?
  18. onemorepilot

    UH-1 Drag Brace

    Exactly! When we have too many rules and policies, we lose the ability to think for ourselves. It doesn't matter if it's flight controls, transmission mounts or the connecting rod bolts on your race car engine. Some things are critical so check them twice. And have someone else check them if you can. We need to teach the young mechanics and pilots to do the right thing even if they're not told to by rule or policy.
  19. HAC Communique July 12/18 Air Time Versus Flight Time Issue Unlikely to be Resolved – At Least Until the Fall Print this Article | Send to Colleague You may recall from a previous issue of the Newsletter, that Transport Canada is revisiting the definitions of Flight Time and Air Time that were recently imposed on the industry. The current definitions have been delivered to Justice, for their interpretation, and there has been some recent dialogue with HAC. Your association has tried to help inform the Department about some of the problems that have arisen with the current definitions. The current definitions were not really drafted with the rotary-wing community in mind. Your association is concerned that the department will torture the interpretation of the current definitions, by applying Guidance Material, rather than fix the problem by revisiting the definitions themselves. You can’t fix a bad definition by applying your own definition that defies the meaning of the words in the regulation. HAC believes that would be “regulation through Guidance Material,” which circumvents the regulatory process altogether. I like the insinuations that there has been New definitions for Flight Time and Air Time imposed on industry recently. The CARs definitions have not changed in 22 years, since the CARs were first introduced in 1996. There have been no new interpretations.offered recently either. TCs 2005 Policy Letter acknowledged that many were interpreting Flight Time = Air Time interpretation prior to 2005 and advised to use ICAO definition. The idea that the definition for flight time was not ideal for Helicopters is nothing new, either. Clearly, that is the case, or TC wouldn’t be continuously be interpreting it differently. This forum wouldn’t have 69 pages and almost 102,000 views either. It was clear back then that the definition was not perfect for Helicopters. That is why TC s 2005 policy letter also committed to amend the CARs to include a specific flight time definition for Helicopters (which stated it would expire when the CARs were amended). Talk about coming full circle (13 years later). What’s really odd, as I understand it, the HAC was instrumental in the creation of the 2005 policy letter. I guess they don’t recall that.
  20. HeliRico

    Wires Again

    I wanna hear some more about those shorts... How bad ? Me?? Yeah, had some really huge dumps in them more thAn once but wire was not a big factor.. ( don’t tell everybody but i use to look at my maps..) . weather use to scare it out most of the time.. i guess i survived some really heavy chit ,! Hey Shakey , what use to and still make the crap come out of ya ?? Bahahahahahaahah !!
  21. 212wrench

    UH-1 Drag Brace

    http://www.bst-tsb.gc.ca/eng/rapports-reports/aviation/2000/a00q0046/a00q0046.asp No need to dual it, not a flight control. Seriously?
  22. Yep I remember when that came out. Sure made things simple. And then they changed their bloody minds.
  23. “ICAO AUDIT OF TRANSPORT CANADA CIVIL AVIATION OVERSIGHT - APRIL 2005 3.2.7 Adequate aircraft operation regulations have been established in the CARs, Part VII ─ Commercial Air Services (CARs 700 to 706) which contains seven subparts: General, Foreign Air Operators, Aerial Work, Air Taxi Operations, Commuter Operations, Airline Operations, and Aircraft Maintenance Requirements for Air Operators. A set of Commercial Air Services Standards (CASS 720 to 726) complement the CARs, which are incorporated by reference into the regulations. These standards provide the detailed requirements in the various areas of aircraft operations. The CARs and CAS are kept up to date on a quarterly basis. The regulatory structure is complemented by policy letters and guidance material such as policies, procedures, circulars and manuals.” https://cfapp.icao.int/fsix/AuditReps/CSAfinal/Canada%20final%20report%202-2-06.pdf Coincidentally the very same year General Aviation POLICY LETTER 2005-02 was issued by TC stating: Action In order to clarify the interpretation of the definition of "flight time" with respect to helicopters as it applies to flight crew licensing, "flight time" shall be as it is set out in Annex 1: "The total time from the moment a helicopter's rotor blades start turning until the moment the helicopter finally comes to rest at the end of the flight, and the rotor blades are stopped."
  24. onemorepilot

    UH-1 Drag Brace

    You are correct SwingWing that one should look at the mast nut on preflight. Please read the previous post to find out when that discrepancy was discovered. Also, next time you're up there, think about how you look at it. From the top you will see that everything is in place. You may even feel that the nut is in place but actually seeing that the nut is not tight is a different matter.
  25. onemorepilot

    UH-1 Drag Brace

    Sorry I checked out for a while... Been in the bush. Where to start?... First, I agree that the safety weinies are important. I was was one for a while and one thing that I learned is that adding another item to a checklist or another signoff (the ICC) is not always the answer. Apparently there is debate about whether a mast nut qualifies. I think it is more important that people think about what they are doing than to blindly follow procedures. We shouldn't have to tell someone that a mast nut is important so be extrat careful. Also, it is important that we are all able to talk about these things. Since we are human, we will make mistakes and they need to be pointed out in order for us to improve. I encourage my ground crews to tell me when I'm doing something stupid. We need to be big boys and girls and accept constructive criticism.
  26. DGP

    Wires Again

    Glad to hear buddy is ok. Time to change the shorts! I sprayed for 17 years and those wires scare the s@#t out of you!
  27. Earlier
  28. Icewind

    Wires Again

    https://thestarphoenix.com/news/saskatchewan/helicopter-crash-sends-pilot-to-saskatoon-hospital
  29. You lost sleep over that one didn’t ya? Lol! two thumbs up 👍🏻👍🏻
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