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  3. twinstar_ca

    Blue River Heliski rollover

    who's the operator?? glad everyone walked away!! 👍
  4. Yesterday
  5. GrayHorizons

    Blue River Heliski rollover

    you have to love a clientele that takes a near death experience and puts it behind them and goes right back at it. Skiers pay alot of money, they sure dont want to lose that vertical footage.
  6. Any information on this story? https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/no-one-hurt-after-heli-skiing-chopper-rolls-in-blue-river-1.5058262
  7. simpleton

    TSB news letter

    So in other words, government employees makes a big deal about doing the jobs they were hired to do in the first place....
  8. BrokenTools

    TSB news letter

    Interesting.
  9. Last week
  10. Canada TSB Begins Special Study of Air-taxi Safety by Gordon Gilbert - March 18, 2019, 9:37 AM Canada’s Transportation Safety Board (TSB) has launched a special study of air-taxi operations following its collection of data that shows over the last 15 years, the segment has seen 813 accidents resulting in 242 fatalities (an average of 16.1 annually) and 162 serious injuries. These deaths represent 62 percent of all commercial aviation fatalities. In Canada, air taxis are regulated under Part 703 and cover piston- and turboprop-powered airplanes and helicopters only. Jet-powered aircraft cannot be operated as air taxis. As such, they are not included in Canada’s air-taxi accident statistics. On-demand charter operations in Canada are operated under Part 704 commuter regulations. The TSB said its investigation reports have repeatedly drawn attention to critical safety issues that contribute to air-taxi accidents. “In spite of this, the air-taxi sector continues to have the highest number of commercial aviation accidents and fatalities.” To identify and communicate the underlying systemic safety issues that need to be addressed, the TSB has launched a special investigation into the industry. TSB statistics show that of the 183 airplane fatalities, 48 occurred in turboprop accidents and 135 in accidents involving reciprocating-engine aircraft. In total, turboprops suffered 133 accidents and recips 411 mishaps. Because there are four times as many air-taxi turboshaft rotorcraft as recips (1,306 versus 329), the accident fatalities are skewed more heavily toward turboshafts. The TSB reported that over the last 15 years, there were five fatalities and 29 total accidents involving recips, compared with 54 fatalities and 240 total accidents of turboshaft helicopters. “If we uncover serious safety deficiencies during the course of our investigation, we will not wait until the public report to make them known,” the TSB said. “We will inform industry and the regulator, as well as the public, as quickly as possible.”
  11. Freewheel

    The original "ORANGE"?

    My point was that averaging agreements are not solely intended for “seasonal jobs” and they can be legally implemented for 24/7/365 operations. Heliian clearly stated that it could not be legally introduced since it is only for seasonal jobs. In fact it can be introduced: If the nature of the work in an establishment necessitates irregular hours due to seasonal or other factors. https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/services/labour-standards/reports/hours-work.html https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/programs/laws-regulations/labour/interpretations-policies/averaging-hours.html As stated she is in a union (CAW local 103), but the Canada Labour Code still applies equally to unionized work places. The standards in the collective bargaining agreement can differ, but at a minimum, must comply with the CLC. As with most pilots in our industry, the averaging agreement was in place when she was hired. Union or not an averaging agreement must be approved by a Labour Affairs Officers (LAOs) who ascertain whether the criteria that qualify an employer to adopt averaging have been met and whether averaging provisions are being correctly applied. Her hours are averaged over a 4 week period/160 hours. She is regularly required to works 15 hours daily. One recent shift was 21 hours with almost 80 hours worked that week. if you are really interested in their averaging agreement see the following link. Page 11 is where the rules for hours of service and O/T is discussed. While the agreement in the link expired Dec 2018, this averaging system has been in place for decades with no significant changes. https://www.sdc.gov.on.ca/sites/mol/drs/ca/Transport/482-15180-18%20(506-0024).pdf
  12. Good response and the hourly averaging thing is always dubious. I’ve seen companies say that flight pay is in place of extra hours worked. I also new a base manager that was sent an email that said he was not really a manager so was not entitled to the management benefits. Many years later when he left and asked for all his extra hours to be paid he was told that as a manager he was not paid that way. He pulled his old email that stated he was not a manager and burned them for over 10,000 grand. Companies can’t have it both ways although they will always try. Cheers.
  13. Sorry Old, I mistook your previous posts as negative and derogatory towards pilots. I do have an excellent rotation and I am compensated very well. In the past I have worked for companies all using the hour averaging program. I know what some of these guys are going through. Every company I have worked for has a different way of recording hours worked. If I was looking for work. I would make the employer explain how the company expects me record time worked in the interview, just so there are no surprises. If the employer thinks I’m going to be a problem and doesn’t want to hire me, that’s fine. I probably don’t want the job anyways. Old, I’m not trying to be negative. I just don’t see your comments as constructive towards the conversation.
  14. Why so hard on yourself? I never called you that. Get a positive attitude it may get you a better rotation.
  15. You can fly you just won’t make as much
  16. How's your banding together to get a duty day and schedule coming?
  17. ya I guess we should all be thankful that we don’t have to dig ditches. I guess us scum bag pilots couldn’t do anything else but dig ditches. Lol.
  18. BoomTown.....I think you already know the answer to your question. But, talk to these people if you really feel the need. http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/labour/ipg/053.shtml Early Resolution Officer North West Pacific Region HRSDC - Labour Program Vancouver, BC (P) 604-658-3478 or 1-800-641-4049
  19. Here it comes again. Next some pilot will say”we need to band together and start a union. Put our foot down” good luck with that. Go dig ditches for a week. Then think again. Lol
  20. kiefk

    The original "ORANGE"?

    But your wife's union, and by default she, agreed to the averaging though right? It wasn't imposed on them as part of their job description. Is her averaging agreement something like this: ARTICLE 9 - Hours of Work and Overtime 9.1 Unless otherwise provided, employees who are regularly assigned to work 40 hours per week will not be required to work in excess of 8 hours in a 24-hour period nor more than 40 hours in a week. Any hours worked in excess of 8 hours in a 24-hour period or 40 hours in a week will be paid for at the rate of time and one-half. 9.2 Employees who are not regularly assigned to work 40 hours in a week will have their hours of work averaged over a period of 14 calendar days consistent with the pay periods in practice within the Company and shall not exceed 80 hours in such 14-day period. Any hours worked in excess of 80 hours will be paid for at the rate of time and one-half. 9.3 Unless otherwise provided, employees whose hours of work are averaged will not be required to work less than 5 hours or more than 10 hours in a 24-hour period. Hours worked in excess of 10 in a 24-hour period will be paid for at the rate of time and one-half. Such hours will not be utilized in computing the 80 hours in the pay period. 9.4 When it becomes necessary for employees to work overtime, they shall not be laid off during regular hours to equalize the time. 13 9.5 Employees called or required to report for overtime work under this clause and reporting, whether used or not, will be allowed a minimum of three hours at prevailing overtime rates. 9.6 Where overtime work is continuous with, before or after, an employee’s regular shift, such work will be assigned to the employee on duty or coming on duty as the case may be, provided that the work is not of three hours duration or more. 9.7 If the duration is more than three hours or is not continuous with a regular shift, a spare employee, if available, will be obligated to fill the requirement for service. When spare employees are not available, employees will be called on a seniority basis to work overtime. 9.8 Nothing herein is intended to prevent the Company from requiring the junior available employee in the classification to fill the requirement for service.
  21. Freewheel

    The original "ORANGE"?

    Without some sort of averaging agreement, you would be generally limited to a maximum of 48 hours of work per week...wouldn’t you? https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/programs/employment-standards/federal-standards/work-hours.html Then what is the point of the CARs limit of 60 hours Flight Time in 7 days?
  22. I seemed to have worked for #4....for 40+ yrs....and usually from sun up to sun down.😩
  23. Freewheel

    The original "ORANGE"?

    My wife is a full time employee at a unionized transportation company (that is also funded by the Ontario government) and operates 24/7/365. They operate under an averaging agreement. Like our industry, Ontario Northland Rail is also federally regulated (and under the Jurisdiction of the Canada Labour Code).
  24. It gets really special when you combine Company 1, 3, and 4...
  25. Yeah, Labour Canada is pretty clear about what constitutes hours of work, despite what the people signing the pay cheques may try to tell you. Namely: In general, an employee is performing “work" when the employee: is on any trial period or training required by the employer; is on travel time required by the employer; is at the employer’s disposal on the worksite and the employee is required to wait for work to be assigned or is assigned work outside their normal responsibilities; and is on a scheduled break granted by the employer.
  26. If you’re curious about a legal interpretation, here’s some light reading https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/programs/laws-regulations/labour/interpretations-policies/hours-work.html
  27. 1.0hrs Airtime 1.1-1.2hrs Flight Time 1.5-1.7hrs Fight Duty Time The balance is "other hours worked" on the timesheet If I'm in the field, it all counts towards my 2080hrs for the year.
  28. Heres the systems i've seen to abuse the seasonal averaging agreement Company 1 -Flight time plus 2hrs Company 2 ( more generous, not like the dirt bags down the road) -minimum 8hrs or flight time plus 2 hrs for days over 8hrs flying Company 3 -If you meet 2080hrs your done flying till Jan1. Put what ever you want on the forum. Company 4 We don't pay over time....
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