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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/21/2017 in all areas

  1. So if you lose one boost pump, unusable fuel is ten gallons. Having an engine quit at 20 gallons without having a boost pump light on (or flickering at least) would be very unusual in my opinion. 10 or 12 gallons indicated while in turbulence or out of trim could be nerve racking but flying at 20 gallons in a 206B should not be a worry. The optional fuel low light comes on at 20 gallons so Bell must feel some comfort that the aircraft will continue to run for a little while after that light illuminates.
    1 point
  2. When I was flying the 206 I was told that 20 gals was acceptable fuel some old timers would say 15 was good. Just like in the Astar be on the ground at 20%. So who are we supposed to listen to? The fact of the matter is the 206 fuel gauge is famously inaccurate and should be regularly calibrated (for lack of a better word) I can see how this type of accident will be blamed on the pilot but in reality why hasn't bell come up with a better system? I feel for Helicopter who was PIC in this accident. I was told a long time ago that PIC stands for Punishment Is Coming. Also if the new standard is
    1 point
  3. There was also this one in 2003: http://www.bst-tsb.gc.ca/eng/rapports-reports/aviation/2003/a03w0194/a03w0194.asp " Fuel unporting is a phenomenon whereby fuel flows away from the fuel pick up in the fuel tank, and will result in a power loss or engine failure due to fuel starvation. Unporting is a function of the amount of fuel available (usually very small quantities), the attitude of the helicopter, and sloshing of the fuel in the tank."
    1 point
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