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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/07/2019 in all areas

  1. I was a lucky pilot who started my career with VIH right here on the West Coast back when VIH was still a smallish company. After a few years flying and figuring it out in Haida Gwaii and Prince Rupert, they put a mountain course into me. It was conducted in Rupert and omitted all the helipad and longline stuff as I'd already done a lot of it considering my total time then. After a couple days of classroom and about 5 hours or less, I was signed off. This was an approved course and I was legally off to the races. From then on, nothing much changed, I just continued flying in the mountains, lon
    2 points
  2. First, that was a statement that has nothing to do with the question, We have gone to the source and they are looking into why there is a difference between the B3 (which allows you to run synthetic oil below minus 20) and the B2/BA - but this is a multi-year program it seems. I ask this out loud because it seems like most operators and pilots are doing what we normally do otherwise Airbus would have corrected this issue long ago and if we don't bring it up as a group then the manufacturer will never change it and we will all be operating outside of the RFM. This was brought to light by
    1 point
  3. I worked with a guy down east here for 5 years and got to be real good friends.At this time I hadn't flown a jetbox for about 7 years.We get chatting one day and we started talking about what we had done flying a 206. It finally gets down to how many passengers you would haul with max fuel for gross weight.I tell him that when I worked out in the prairies I normally would only take 3 passengers.He tells me when he worked in BC he was told to always take 4 .We all know what a jetbox will haul .You aint going very far with 4 passengers and gear in a jetbox ....do the math. Now throw in some alti
    1 point
  4. "I did just over 20 hours in the southern Rockies in a jet box. It was the most humbling thing I have ever done. I laugh at the 5 hour hac course. I also feel if you have 1000 hours in the rocks you are still far, far from a experienced mountain pilot and potentialy a even bigger hazard because you may be over confident and think your a mountain pilot.. Now, years later I have flown on oxygen in the Andes in Chile and Peru, was base pilot on the continental divide.. I can tell you I still do not feel remotely as experienced as I would like think I am. I still am very humble flying in t
    1 point
  5. I did just over 20 hours in the southern Rockies in a jet box. It was the most humbling thing I have ever done. I laugh at the 5 hour hac course. I also feel if you have 1000 hours in the rocks you are still far, far from a experienced mountain pilot and potentialy a even bigger hazard because you may be over confident and think your a mountain pilot.. Now, years later I have flown on oxygen in the Andes in Chile and Peru, was base pilot on the continental divide.. I can tell you I still do not feel remotely as experienced as I would like think I am. I still am very humble flying in th
    1 point
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