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  1. 5 points
    Gtfo Another useless 'consultant' with ZERO expierence in the real world.
  2. 5 points
    If a guy can't abstain for a few weeks while on tour, perhaps a career change might be best.
  3. 4 points
    Couldn’t agree more.
  4. 3 points
    n general the purpose of the per diem payment (or the deduction of expenses when inadequate reimbursements are provided) is to alleviate the burden on taxpayers whose business or employment travel creates duplicated expenses. That is straight from the CRA. Most per diems today are not even close to what the government allows, yet this is tax deductible and can be included in the rate for the aircraft in a per hour basis anyway. At $40 which seems to be the lowest rate today, is 11 dollars short of what CRA considers standard, and does NOT include incidentals. CRA today considers MEAL allowance only to be $90.10 CAD with an additional $17.50 for incidentals. It has nothing to do with supplementing income, but getting businesses into the 21st Century. How many here are issued cellphones from the company? Lap Top Computers? Do you use your own for anything related to the business? hence the increased per diems. $51 + incidentals seem to be the lowest they should be today, unless you feed me on site, then I can accept ONLY incidentals, but if I have to use anything of my own, I should get the current rate at a minimum.
  5. 3 points
    I enjoy watching the water drop from 200ft Above the trees and evaporating before it gets to the ground!
  6. 3 points
    Heres the systems i've seen to abuse the seasonal averaging agreement Company 1 -Flight time plus 2hrs Company 2 ( more generous, not like the dirt bags down the road) -minimum 8hrs or flight time plus 2 hrs for days over 8hrs flying Company 3 -If you meet 2080hrs your done flying till Jan1. Put what ever you want on the forum. Company 4 We don't pay over time....
  7. 3 points
    Hope you’re getting mins and not just sitting there for your day rate + 1 hour flt pay! If you are, you are better off working at the local bowling alley cuz that dude is making more per hour than you. Ahhhhhhh but wait you get to tell all the chicks you’re a Pilot right! That’s why we all do it correct? And to answer your question it would be a 11 hour duty day as TC would like to see at least 30 mins prior to departure and 30 mins after landing for preflight/post flight and paperwork.
  8. 3 points
    My rules to live by in Mtn Flying; My favorite Whitesnake song; ”slow and easy” think of yourself at a pool or hottub, Always dip your toe in before you jump right in..... know when your in upflow or downflow air, dont be afraid to ‘shuttle’ in loads, by that I mean if you are heavy and the LZ is not quite right, find another spot and make a couple of trips to the LZ.
  9. 3 points
    I was a lucky pilot who started my career with VIH right here on the West Coast back when VIH was still a smallish company. After a few years flying and figuring it out in Haida Gwaii and Prince Rupert, they put a mountain course into me. It was conducted in Rupert and omitted all the helipad and longline stuff as I'd already done a lot of it considering my total time then. After a couple days of classroom and about 5 hours or less, I was signed off. This was an approved course and I was legally off to the races. From then on, nothing much changed, I just continued flying in the mountains, long lining a huge variety of jobs ranging from 200' choker jobs to mountain top repeater/tower work. All this was done with no formal training and me just figuring it out and/or asking lot's of questions of my peers. I believe I got lucky a few times, learned some valuable lessons that can only be learned by doing it...repeatedly. From there came heliskiing in Astars and seismic in the high mountains of China (Extremely humbling?) Fast forward 10 years from there and the real mountain learning came with skiing in a 212...Thats is where the real learning and humbling experiences continued almost daily... Sorry, i rambled on, not meant to be a resume...Lol, just that my 2 bits are, I don't believe they should put an hour level on a course. It should be and I think is in some circumstances, a competency based course. If you learned from the beginning in the mountains, that's a good situation because it's just what you know and are comfy with. If you want to fly in the mountains but currently don't, try and get hired by a company that operates in the designated mountainous regions. They might even just give you a course after they get to know you.
  10. 3 points
    I did just over 20 hours in the southern Rockies in a jet box. It was the most humbling thing I have ever done. I laugh at the 5 hour hac course. I also feel if you have 1000 hours in the rocks you are still far, far from a experienced mountain pilot and potentialy a even bigger hazard because you may be over confident and think your a mountain pilot.. Now, years later I have flown on oxygen in the Andes in Chile and Peru, was base pilot on the continental divide.. I can tell you I still do not feel remotely as experienced as I would like think I am. I still am very humble flying in the rocks, and all I have really learned, is to maintain huge respect for the rocks. There are a lot of pilots that fly in the mountains but few I would call mountain pilots, I am still trying to become a “mountain pilot” Note in the pic, altitude, t4 vs tq.
  11. 2 points
    Well it turns out we do agree on some things.
  12. 2 points
    Holy crap that is terrible. Ol' Eddy was one of those characters unique to our industry... the kind of guy who would have been home on a ship raiding Spanish galleons in the 1600's. He deserved much better and should have retired into a comfortable chair to reflect on all he'd accomplished, and not against small odds. RIP HV
  13. 2 points
    Hey how about those cool old photos eh?
  14. 2 points
    Thats pretty much it for story time....I turned down a job this summer flying fishermen out of a lodge in BC for my buddy who works out of Vancouver Island...too much travelling and I didn't want to fly an Astar....oh well...I may find time to write up some more stuff...its been 45 years!
  15. 2 points
    We had bben watching the sun getting lower and lower way out to are right side. When it slipped under the waves we knew a call would be coming. The guy in the tower wants to know our eta and I tell him we are 60 miles back and will be on the ramp in 30 minutes. He is happy to hear this and also says there are 3 cruise ships leaving the island right now and says do not fly over them on the way in. These boats were lite up like a christmas tree...better than an ils....we continue in and call final for the ramp. It is pretty much black as I flip on the landing light and settle onto the ramp. We do Customs and get picked up by our hotel owners Audi suv... very nice! Its about a 20 minute drive to the hotel....pitch black. We get to the hotel and I tell buddy I am starving so we walk downtown to have supper.....to be continued
  16. 2 points
    I see it’s getting harder and harder to find good people. Looking at companies who post every month looking for pilots and engineers maybe it’s time all us pilots and engineers get together and start demanding what we are really worth.
  17. 2 points
    Now that sounds more like what has been going on in Canada for the last 40 yrs....sadly.... i worked a lot of fires in Canada and I must say Manitoba at least tried to treat heli crews with some respect. Back in the good old days we use to have a great time on fires in Manitoba . After ever project fire...big fire ... we use to have a big wind up bash. Everyone left waiting for the next one...good times ....I could tell a few good stories...but to protect the rep of a lot of great pilots and engineers I will keep them to myself.I can remember rolling back into base camp at sundown...getting out of my machine after 10 hrs of givin er and have a CO open my door and hand me a cold beer and tell me the steaks were on the barbie...what the he## happened to those days!
  18. 2 points
    Trades, in general, are provincially licensed. Red Seal allows a trades person meet a minimum standard to work across provinces. Our AME licenses are federally issued, and automatically allows us to work across provinces. We don't need a Red Seal.
  19. 2 points
    Bwhahahahahaha keep posting the vids on YouTube they are always good for a laugh. I enjoyed the icing video as well! There was also one about not being able to put avgas in a turbine my buddy told me, when all real pilots know a turbine will burn pretty much anything in a pinch including avgas, it just takes time off the components. I’m pretty sure everybody knows someone or has even done it themselves in a pinch. Keep pumping out them students! Lol
  20. 2 points
    Hahahahahaha isn’t that how all the real pilots make it in this industry? Personally the Icing video is my favourite and the look of shear panic and terror on his face. Classic! Wonder if you should be teaching students when the first 500 hours of your “career” he had no real mentorship from anyone. I don’t think I would take any advice from anyone who needs a copilot in a jet ranger to longline lumber. On that note not sure if that’s legal either but ah well that’s another topic.
  21. 2 points
    If you can do your whole CPL on the 22, keep costs down and go from there. Once your done training your first job will be the biggest priority. If that company trains low time guys on their aircraft then it would be pointless to have spent more on endorsements if you don't need them. Each company could vary. If a rating will be required then you can decide at the time. I did the 44 rating in school and never flew it beyond the rating. I have friends who did only the 22 in school and have never been held back because they didn't have a 44 or 206 rating. Hope that helps a bit.
  22. 2 points
    How's your banding together to get a duty day and schedule coming?
  23. 2 points
    Now someone post HeliJets pay for air ambulances pilots!!!!!!
  24. 2 points
    Well said sirlandsalot! The irony is, the guys without the mountain time (course) are typically the ones that don't think it is a big deal. The course should be not called "flying in the mountains" but rather "landing in the mountains"...or "operating a 150' long line at 98% TQ in the mountains ". Flying "through" or "around" the mountains, is not why you need to be humble and really have you Sh*t together. "Working" within the environment, in the changing weather, the and the DA with high winds, is why!! It is NOT comparable to any other environment, so be humble and don't try to pretend it is. 90% of the time you can get away with "figuring it out"....the other 10% should be mentored by chief pilots, instructors or other experienced pilots. The point is, its the 10% that is what is going to get you (and likely a group of pax) some day. In my opinion....the more experienced you get, the 10% rarely happens because you have already used your PDM to abort or not even get close to a situation that you don't want to be in. Im not advocating 20 hours....but there is a reason they came up with that number. That said, 5 hours is not going to send you heliskiing. Get some training, read the books and then get some exposure with the help of people that are positive.
  25. 2 points
    I made this Flight Duty tracker a while back. You enter 1ˢᵗ date to start tracking in cell A5. Piot's name in cell A3 Click "Jump to today" button on the top to make the spreadsheet jump to today's date. It resets Flight time accumulated after a 5 day period of no flying. If it meets your requirements you're more than welcome to use it Enter flight time in column C. Duty start/end in columns P and Q. When limits are close to being exceeded they're highlighted in yellow, when they're critical in orange, when exceeded in red. The sheet is also optimized to print well on a printer with headers on each page. If you need any modifications or corrections, let me know, I can try to implement those on my downtime. Flight Duty Time - v1.2.xlsm
  26. 1 point
    Since i've been in this industry over 30yrs, I know that there are many views on whats good and whats bad. and i especially get a kick out of the replies in here. please take them for what they are.... their experience. your experience will be different depending on how you approach the situations laid before you. I encourage you to chase your dreams, be prepared to fall, or to soar. No one can determine your outcome or direction except yourself. And remember, some guys are so protective of their feeble careers they will try to steer you astray for their own protection.
  27. 1 point
    sticks down all.... health issues are a touchy subject.... if the discussion helps only 1 person, it was worth it... 😎👍
  28. 1 point
    I wouldnt worry about a bad season. they aren't going to park helicopters while the forest burns. They will still be crewing them and fighting. Helicopter companies will still thrive on fires. Greta and Elon are corroborating on a solar powered S92 that can run all day long on just pennies and put out 10 times more fire than any of its predecessors. this decision may mean more fires get bigger and out of control, and when they do, they'll just declare state of emergencies and chase the Federal government for the cash to fund the fire response with even more helicopters and crews. the province saves money, the Feds cover more. As a tax payer I feel the pinch and start to eat whole wheat KD three times a day to survive.
  29. 1 point
    It was 4.5 hrs from the camp back to Rankin and it will be another 4.5 back to Gilliam today. I get into Gilliam thinking i will be able to take it easy and have a few drinks with Jimmy but that was wishful thinking. Jim tells me that I am to get to Wpg as soon as I can as I will be going on fires in Ontario tomorrow. Lovely...another 3.8 hrs and I get a night at home an I am on route to Dryden in the morning....I am getting pissed off!
  30. 1 point
    I can't remember why but we changed ships in Gilliam and left early in the morning. We refueled in Churchill and head out for Eskimo Point. The weather was miserable...low ceilings...raining...we refuel again in EP and head north for Rankin. Weather is much better...O/C but good vis...we get to Rankin and I refuel and put 4 cans of jet fuel in the baggage comp...after crossing Chesterfield Inlet...I dump the spare fuel in the ship and head for Repulse Bay. I have been following the coast...ground is now covered with snow...its June 15th...fly across Repulse Bay which I thought was just frozen until I see seals swimming around...it had about 20 ft of water over top of the ice...nice...I am getting low on fuel and could not have made it without flying straight across this Bay...I land in the village and start looking for the fuel that I was told was owned by the folks that were in the camp that I was going to...I find the fuel...top up the ship and the spare fuel cans and head N/E ..lots of snow on the ground up here!!! I get to the spot on my gps that says is where the camp is...nothing but white...after a couple of wide circles around without seeing anything all of a sudden a person appears out of no where...I land and it is Chris...the engineer...the tents on the ground have white tarps overtop of them...you cannot see them from the air with the snow on the ground. Had Chris not appeared when he did I was going to go back to Repulse...kind of scary out there with just barely enough fuel to get back to town. This is a pic of where we worked on the ship...this was taken just before I headed south for Rankin. It was a 9 hr ferry from Gilliam to this camp.
  31. 1 point
    what? the self described rotary god doesn't have the crystal ball answer?? you let us all down. #fail
  32. 1 point
    Canadore Bush Camp, White Lake. 1984..........some good times had there as well.
  33. 1 point
    One of the first I met in the industry and certainly one of the most memorable. He will be missed
  34. 1 point
    Well we stuff old XZU into their hangar and in minutes they are getting rid of the registration...fuel tank in the back seat is gone in 30 minutes and the guys in the hangar want to know if I want to go and have some local rum...what do you think!!! I am told I have to be over at my hotel by 8 so I said that will work. Off we go...well this outdoor bar might be okay if you are in Vietnam during 1966 but it is lets say austern ...a run down shack with some tables and chairs out on a mud patio...oh well...bring on the rum...its been a he## of a day!
  35. 1 point
    Well south of the airport in Trinidad there aint much to look at...rugged ground and very poor looking places..oh well... we reach the south side of the island in about 20 minutes and head out over the very brown water.I can hear helicopter chatter on the vhf and most have British accents. I give a shout on 122.8 and get a guy on the radio flying an S-76...works for Bristol Heli. I tell him my location and destination and tell him if I am in any trouble I will expect him to fire off a call to search and rescue which he gladly excepts...thanks guys! We have an overcast sky...very gray and not to high. We are cruising at 1000 ft which I do not want to get any lower...to be continued
  36. 1 point
    We pass right over the runway on the Island of St Kitts. This was our original fuel stop for today. We continue south and I can see some nasty showers ahead.Things get pretty rough and we get to see lightning happening out over the ocean...not cool! It is a 3 hr ride from Saint Marteen to St.Luscia...over some very black and nasty looking ocean. We are also fighting daylight .We left at 3 PM and sundown is at 6. You are not aloud night vfr in the Caribbean. As the gps goes from daytime to nighttime mode we get a call from the St Luscia tower...to be continued.
  37. 1 point
    Okay...continuing on from yesterday. I had met a few Florida State Police pilots while attending many HAI's especially the ones in Orlando so I thought I would head over and chat up the boys. Unfortunately non of the guys at this base had met me but they were interested in my destination. They all said what??? when I said South America. Followed by ...you must be nuts!!! Well I say so long and get a bunch of hand shakes and good lucks and we blast off heading for South Florida. We have enough fuel on now to not have to stop at Orlando. That airport is just crazy with traffic...try getting in touch with atc at that place....crazy!!! So as we head south I tell our passenger to get ready for some picture taking as we are going right over Disneyland! This guy was just picture nuts. He couldn't stop taking pics of everything especially of fast food joints! I will find out later why! So we buzz over Disney and he is flipping out. I mention to Dennis that we are going right over the convention center which we had attended the HAI the year before...cool! We are heading for the west side of Oppachokie Lake and will do about 50 miles though the everglade before arriving at Tamiami aiport which is the general aviation airport for Miami...it is extremely busy!....to be continued...got to go again! The pic is in Orlando at the HAI with myself and Dennis.
  38. 1 point
    I agree Ive talked with pilots and engineers who have worked at companies for 15+ years and all of them say they have set schedules they are all VFR operators. What makes one different from the other?
  39. 1 point
    Technology and a shortage of pilots to fill the flight decks of tomorrow’s business jets and airliners are creating pressure to facilitate more single-pilot operations. Avionics manufacturers are developing technology for safe single-pilot operations, but pilots have been flying alone safely in light aircraft through Part 23 jets for many years. Learn about factors that are causing the flying landscape to shift toward more single-pilot operations, what kind of automation avionics manufacturers are developing for single-pilot operations and what we can learn from experienced pilots flying in single-pilot operations. Join AIN editor-in-chief Matt Thurber on April 24 at 1:30 p.m. EDT as he moderates the discussion with Tal Golan, manager, rotorcraft business development for Universal Avionics, and Charlie Precourt, former NASA astronaut, safety expert, and Citation owner. Sponsored by Universal Avionics Register for the free webinar.
  40. 1 point
    I'm in the exact same boat. After 15 yrs I'm fed up as well, taking some time off and back to school.
  41. 1 point
    600 bucks a day!! I thought we all did it for the love of flying and the chicks??
  42. 1 point
    Perhaps its salty attitudes and not the companies. I have worked for some terrible companies and I was always treated well and considered it a good job. I'm working, I'm useful, just because I work with some half-wits doesnt make me one of them, at least I would hope not. EDIT: I could be wrong. I lack experience in this industry.
  43. 1 point
    If Hydro 1 is a private company, its a poorly run one But I digress, I'm not sure how much the province of Ontario owns as shares, but the fact Douglas Ford is attacking the company constantly, I'm not thinking it's really a "private company" per se. Regardless of the theatrics of politics involved, its a fail two fold with the privatization and the government oversight. IF OMNR didn't have contractors, then they'd burn all of Ontario to the ground by mid June. But that wasn't my point. I'd rather see the fat paychecks end and the rest that goes with it, back into competitive markets and private operators. My tax contribution would surely reduce somewhat and I'd see a few bucks back into my pocket. And Ornge doesn't have all new aircraft. Newer maybe, but look closely at the fleet. Didn't you get one from ERA not long ago? Hows the airframe time and condition on that one? As a mechanic, I've seen 20000hr astars in better shape than 1500hr ones. So its a moot point when you talk about aircraft age even though its the easiest argument to lay on the table when you talk of safety.
  44. 1 point
    Heliian....you've been around long enough, don't surmise anything when it comes to the french. 😜
  45. 1 point
    Once again folks thanks for all of the great replies. With the said club attitude going on and from what I just heard from a friend who also was looking around out west I think I will not waste the cash buying a mountain course. At this stage in my career its probably safer to stick with what I know. I have had enough scary s**t in 40+ years without looking for more. Again thanks.
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    If you can get access to a Bose or light speed headset with ANR you could try before you buy. After 22 years in an SPH5 I recently upgraded to an “Aspida” ( made by Paraclete USA) carbon fibre with light speed Zulu installed, absolutely love it! Very light. I’ve heard stories of buffeting when longlining with the door off but I haven’t experienced that, works fine for me.
  48. 1 point
    Well, I hate to be the bearer of bad news but you're basically guaranteed to be "low grade" for longer than 1.5 yrs. I got lucky and started flying tours after 1.5 yra of ground crew, but I know folks that have been on the ground 5+ yrs. And once you start flying, it's not a lot. It's a ferry flight here and there, it's a maintenance run at 5am or 9pm, if you're super lucky it's a tourism gig doing 200hrs a summer, or an oil&gas contract doing 1.5hrs a day. Your heliski dream doesn't even begin to become an possibility until many years in, and hundreds to thousands of flight hours under your belt. Even then, many don't make the cut, many can't cope with the stress of flying a demanding client in one of the worst combination of conditions a pilot could expect. I haven't touched heliski yet, I want to so I can try it out but it's entirely possible it won't be for me. I know guys with thousands of hours more than me and they won't go near it , or tried it once and will never go back.
  49. 1 point
    Created version 3, now supports output to GPX (Garmin GPS and BaseCamp) and also KML (Google Earth and ForeFlight) Excel2GPS v3.00.xlsm
  50. 1 point
    I agree with 2tall. I did a bunch of research on the Evo as a replacement of my Gallet. After watching their promotion videos and speaking with Rob at Merrit in the US I went with another Gallet. I don't believe the Evo's are tested to the same standard and when I weighed the two, the Eva was actually a bit heavier than my Gallet. At the cost of helmets these days you want to make the right choice the first time.
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