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Atlantis

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Everything posted by Atlantis

  1. 1) I don''t knows the details of what the books say but if that is the situation, then something should be done. 2) Not fair at all. Again, I don''t know the details of the Canadian culture, but it sounds unfair to me. I applied for a Canadian college and I noticed that the form mentioned there were a few seats for black people. It said it in a very correct manner of course...but that''s basically what it said. That''s racism and it''s wrong. 3) In any industry where there''s more people to employ, then jobs available, this kind of thing happens. I bet most pilots wouldn''t mind flying for AC or another major for free for as long as they could afford it, just to get that experience on their resume and those hours logged. Until all those retirements that every flying school mentions on their website ( ) happen, things won''t change. That''s my guess...
  2. I guess fuel price is important. I still remember the days when you could get an ab-initio Frozen ATPL for €30,000. Now it''s over €50,000. And I''m not that old!... Hey, here''s a question for everyone. If you could pick a license to have and a permit to work anywhere, which one would you pick? honesty...
  3. PS: A European pilot wanting to work in Canada would also have to convert his JAA license right?
  4. ---------------- On 3/13/2003 11:17:23 AM Randy_G wrote: And if it''s heaven over there, why are there so many Europeans looking to come to Canada to fly ?? Cheers ---------------- I meant that Europe IS NOT heaven. "I''ve spoken to a few Canadian pilots and they seemed to think Europe was heaven for pilots. Lots of airlines, etc... Of course they forgot it''s a 350 million people market with lots and lots of pilots." That''s what I said. It''s a huge market with a lot of jobs flying but also a lot of pcompetition. It IS very hard to land a job in Europe. Concerning the European airline academies, they do get you a job with low flying time but, as you can imagine, they''re very hard to get into. The training is funded by the airline so I''d guess EVERYONE has a go at them before paying for their training in some flight school. Oxford Training asks for £60,000... other places around €50,000. That''s a lot of money. I''d say the States are the best place to find a job flying but of course the mighty "Green Card" is a must.
  5. Well I''m not familiar with the details of the Canadian immigration policy for pilots (I guess Transport Canada along with the government would be responsible for that) but can''t Canadians convert their licenses and work in Europe for example? I''ve spoken to a few Canadian pilots and they seemed to think Europe was heaven for pilots. Lots of airlines, etc... Of course they forgot it''s a 350 million people market with lots and lots of pilots. The reason why some low time pilots get jobs with airlines in Europe is mainly because they were trained by them. Either in their own academies or in flight school''s with which airlines have agreements to recruit the best pilots whenever they need to (Oxford Aviation in the UK is a good example). Some airlines, and it''s yet to be proven that they''re wrong, rather have low time pilots flying rigth seats than experienced pilots since they can train them in an airline manner. I hope you know what I mean... By the way, the European market is open and you get pilots from Scandinavia flying in Italy or Spain and vice-versa. The same applies for training. No conversions needed between JAA member states, meaning training in Greece or Portugal will get you a job in Belgium. Why not walk towards one common worldwide market and rules? My 2 cents...
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