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Vast

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Vast last won the day on April 24 2012

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About Vast

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  • Birthday 12/28/1975

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    Western Canada

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  1. I've used the Roho Airhawk for years in the astar with a 1" piece of firm foam under it for height as I remove the lower seat cushion. Does wonders if your on the side of your a$$ all day long lining. Don't think they make the airhawk any more but the low profile single compartment looks nearly identical accept for the cut out in the front half that the airhawk has. I've used it in the 212 as well and works great. Doesn't work so well in the newer seats in the astars as it's a bit too wide.
  2. for those getting their licence, get your 5 dual with your instructor during your training.
  3. When the FLI gauge takes over ( I usually turn fuel pump off and GEN On at 67%)
  4. http://helihub.com/2015/03/09/frasca-international-and-hnz-group-announce-simulator-program/
  5. Foreflight is useful for "Navigation" but is no where near as useful as the 296 for usability. Not that great for helicopters IMO.
  6. Only thing I can think of is be sure you've used the correct name "user_waypoints". Everyone I know with trouble gets the name wrong. Has to be exactly as above^ and don't type the extension. It doesn't like tracks. They appear as waypoints. You can only upload one file. Hope that helps
  7. Yes... http://www.foreflight.com/support/user-waypoints You can only upload 1 waypoint list and it can only be called "user_waypoints" (Don't type the file extension in the name) Export your gpx file to a csv file in Garmin Base camp or Mapsource then rename the exported file to user_waypoints. Don't include track logs with the gpx file. It will show up as a bunch of waypoints along the track too far apart to be of any use.
  8. As requested. Not the place You'd want to be.
  9. Looking at the pic that followed this one, I'd have to say he wasn't planning on what happened next but fortunately got away with it. Perfect example of just exactly why we should do risk assessments. I do them because it's basically a snap shot of your day with all the risks and forces you to consciously look at all the risks involved and see what number you come up with on a scale. It's surprising some days what you end up with.
  10. Pilot ok. http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/Crews+responding+helicopter+crash+near+Grande+Cache/8471117/story.html Lets let this trend stop here guys. Be safe this summer!
  11. You make plenty of good points which I agree with so no need to get touchy and defensive. I was referring to these points I've quoted. It's no secret people do this. I know a guy who went from 300 hrs. to 2000 hrs. in a month and has since had 2 accidents. We don't need to encourage this type of behaviour.
  12. You make me laugh... You're now trying to offer up advice about the integrity and quality of people that we should be looking at while twice in this thread you have suggested that they lie about their hours. I've got to say first to the "New guys", don't take this advice as much as you feel it would help. It can lead to a possibly deadly situation when you get over your head.
  13. Do your weight and balance calcs with no door with say a 200 lb. load on the hook and you'll find that your long is over 110 pretty much all the time. Any load over roughly 40 lbs. will put you into that restricted area. This of course depends on the C of G of said ship. In the 20 or so 206's I've flown, pretty much every one of them had this issue. The grey question here is do we factor the weight and arm of the external load into the ship... I'd say of course but this means we must keep our doors on. As for your question, a Bell guy explained to me it's not the weight but how the airflow is effected around the fuselage at speed. Not really an issue when long lining of course which is probably why we've always overlooked the whole thing I went on about earlier. How C of G works with speed... the faster you fly, the more forward cyclic is required. Your neutral cyclic position while hovering is governed by your C of G. I'd say it's restricted due to the new fore and aft limits of the cyclic.
  14. "in private turbine-powered and commercial airplanes configured with six or more passenger seats" I don't see how this affects us unless you are a fixed wing operator.
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