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John Moore

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About John Moore

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  1. I can't remember who it was, Pitt or Dobbin or some CEO between the two but he said that if unions ever became a reality he would sell the company. This statement exists in print somewhere.
  2. Assuming the accident occurred around one o’clock in the afternoon, the temperature in Cody Wyoming, elevation 5,100 feet, was 48 degrees F. The elevation of the accident site was 11,900 feet, a difference of almost 7,000 feet. Allowing for a lapse rate of 3.6 degrees F for every 1,000-foot gain in elevation, an estimate of the temperature atop Ptarmigan Peak is 23 degrees F. The density altitude at 11,900 feet at 23 degrees F is about 12,200 feet. We do not know what the wind was. Experienced pilots are quite good at judging wind but performance charts make no allowance for this vari
  3. You are wrong. The job is built around the engineer's weekend off. This is 2007, not 1967. You will suffer the consequences if you fail to acknowledge this.
  4. Leaving a helicopter running with no one at the controls is just plain wrong.
  5. Anyone who thinks that passengers intentionally vomit in a helicopter as a joke thinks very strangely indeed. If you think it has nothing to do with the way the pilot flies, you are mistaken. Although it is impossible to fly with no accelerations (turning is an acceleration) the pilot should do everything he can to minimize them. This means no tight turns, rapid climbs or descents or abrupt manouvers of any kind. Ask your passengers before the flight if anyone is prone to motion sickness. Advise them to keep their eyes on the horizon and keep the passenger compartment as cool and supplied
  6. The Alouette II was equipped not with a torque meter but with a main blade pitch indicator. I believe the limit was 17 degrees of pitch but this could be reduced to 15 degrees depending on ambient air density. How do you calibrate your thumb? If you overtorque, will you know by how much? You would if you were consulting the gauge. External gauges have been around for years. Put your thumb someplace else.
  7. It seems to me that the single most important aviation safety concern is the psychological well-being of crews. How TC could not recognize that the often deplorable living conditions and the ludicrous standard of working 42 consecutive 14 hour days to which pilots are subject contributes to accidents is puzzling. Two explanations are possible. Either TC and the operators are just too stupid to realize how important living and working conditions are or they do realize it but refuse to change it because of the costs involved. I believe the latter is the case. Profit concern trumps safety co
  8. Here are some thoughts on the conclusions of the Helicopter AOC Industry Self-Management Feasibility Study. 1. Statistically the Canadian safety oversight system has been cruising steadily for the last 20 years. The argument can be advanced that the accident rate, rather than being stagnant should be improving. 2. H-AOC Industry Self-management could be like installing a hydrid engine that would increase the cruise speed of the system and considerably improve its efficiency. What does this mean? It is a senseless analogy. 3. The helicopter industry is a homoge
  9. Here are some thoughts on the conclusions of the Helicopter AOC Industry Self-Management Feasibility Study. 1. Statistically the Canadian safety oversight system has been cruising steadily for the last 20 years. The argument can be advanced that the accident rate, rather than being stagnant should be improving. 2. H-AOC Industry Self-management could be like installing a hydrid engine that would increase the cruise speed of the system and considerably improve its efficiency. What does this mean? It is a senseless analogy. 3. The helicopter industry is a homoge
  10. The trend globally and across the spectrum of all sorts of free enterprise is for larger companies to consume the smaller. It is the sure fire way to eliminate the competition and increase the customer base. It is very difficult to see how operators of only a few machines can survive. Their costs per helicopter operated are higher than those companies that run twenty or in some cases one hundred machines and yet the smaller outfits must charge rates that are no higher than the larger ones. The economies of scale have a significant effect. If the small companies are smart, they wil
  11. I believe the way most fair to pay engineers for both them and their employers is to pay by the hour. Some other issues that the written employment contract should address are: annual vacation; overtime; medical and dental benefits; tool allowance; travel days; schedule of days on and days off. In 1997 Transport Canada reports that the average hourly wage in Canada for an urban transit mechanic was $30.10. Evidence from other web sites that list occupational wage rates suggest that a trade like helicopter engineer is worth at least that and more. As this is 2007, I think a fair wage for
  12. This incident is a direct result of the cavalier attitude that exists within the culture of helicopter pilots. The thinking goes like this: unless the weather is so horrible that even a takeoff can not be made, most pilots will depart, reasoning that if it becomes unflyable they will either land or turn around. The difficulty is that once airborne, the desire to press on often overwhelms the good sense to stop. This accident is a perfect example of the danger of this kind of thinking. A pilot has the moral obligation and the legal responsibility to familiarize himself with the weather
  13. Unions enable the employees to have binding contracts with their employers. Why the employer should be so against this is surprising. Few operators will enter into an agreement to provide helicopter services without a written contract. Without a written contract, the employee is employed at will. He can be fired for no reason. Unions have at least one advantage for the employer. They can deal with all of their employees at once rather than individually in matters such as wages. Those who think that unions form just so that its members can strike are wrong. No one wants to strik
  14. I believe your words have helped make my point regarding pilots who are eager to please when you related your story. You said: “My first year flying was done flying numbskulls like you around and trying their best to put me and my aircraft in harms way. These were supposed seasoned geos and one had been in a hiller 12e crash and was the biggist pusher of the crew. If not for guidance from a Mr. Al Engst helping me whos knows.” The conclusion seems to be that if not for the presence of Mr. Engst something very bad may well have happened. This underscores my contention that pilots
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