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bushman

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  1. Only met Wayne and Linda once when looking for work as a low timer, but i remember them as very warm, polite, genuine people. Definitely think he is one of the good ones, seems like a lot of people agree here. I am in Dawson Creek and was thinking of stopping by to say hello on Friday on my way to Peace River, so quite the shock here. I wish both Wayne and Linda the best in what must be a very difficult time and the thought that in many ways, big and small, Wayne is remembered very fondly. Stay strong. Regards, SGBushman
  2. Happy, if you are sure it is actually silver that you found, it is most likely coming from the carrier on one of the bearings, # 8 being the hottest and under most stress. the balls spalling would not be a sliver but some kind of small chunk as they are stainless steel and it is not likely to form a sliver. Balls spalling anywhere would mean a very short life remaining on any of those bearing as the rpm on the turbine group is somewhere around 33,000 rpm, more for the compressor of course. I am assuming you did a mag test on the sliver, therefore your take that it is silver. Slivers per se could come from other areas around the bearings, I am not that versed on the 250 but say on an Ariel, we troubleshot one back to the large nut that hold the torque meter gear in the gear box. As it got torqued and met with the face of the gear, it tore a small thin but fairly long sliver out of the face of the nut and that of course fell to the bottom of the gear box at some point during operation, erdo, instant cheap light... Now where did it come from, not so obvious at first... This might have been prevented by running a wet oiled finger on the mating surfaces of the to-be-torqued assembly before assembly. Maybe it was done, it is hard to say after the engine has been put back together, sent to the operator and then flown for 25 to 50 hours or so. Then again it might just be the luck of the draw. If you happen to speak to a 250 builder from an O/H shop, ask them if any silber seals are used in the oil pipes of the oil system. That could be the source also. I am not familiar enough with the 250 , again just from memory, i think there is one on the bottom of the small oil scavenge pan that drains your #7 and #6 brgs. Doubt it could somehow put any silver in the oil flow, but you never know, typically these things would be a result of some kind of installation foul up. Anyway hopes that help a bit.
  3. Kopterdoc and all others who responded; thank you for the help. Unfortunately, with these numbers (hi amps) the application i was thinking of will not work. The idea was to have a portable (emphasis on portable ) gasoline GPU. There are some around but they usually weigh 80 pounds or more. But with the hi amps needed, the engine would have to be too big and heavy, and that would defeat the purpose of making one and carrying it around the bush... regards, bm
  4. replied to your pm before reading the board, so forget the question about the campus... bm
  5. Hi Ray, thx for the input. I dont have the manual and am away for another 3 weeks on vacation. This is just nagging at me and just wanted to look at some parts to make the GPU happen while i am here. From memory the system is 28,5v and the starter can take up to 30v. I think 200amps starter generators are available but really, what i am after is how much juice i should give it to come close to a perfect start 99% of the time. Most of the portable battery GPU claim 28.5v at 25 amps continuous and around 700 amps peak but that still does nt tell me what the normal profile for the start is. Ray>>>>>>
  6. Have not been able to find exact information as to how many amps at what voltage a good start is supposed to look like. Perkins when describing their starter/generator for the b206 and astar says that it produces 3.8 hp with a 20v input. That would be roughly 2800watts so 100a at 28v, but I doubt the numbers work exactly like that. What i would like to know is what is the complete profile from hitting the start button to releasing it at 58 % N1 . Peak amp draw, continuous etc... Where can i find those figures? Or any seat of the pants guesstimates? (if you need to know, this is in order to size a GPU) Bushman
  7. Just wondering, how is the new campus and how are the classes going? If you are posted on a helicopter forum, then you`re a helicopter guy or gal, how is BCIT at covering helicopter subjects, related theory etc, even when not directly in the helicopter courses themselves ( I mean are helicopters referred to as you are discussing other topics)? Thx for your input BM >>> 3 weeks off untill we start up at the new campus in september! The last level has been pretty cool, actually I really like it. Learning how to rivit, deal with sheet metal, composits ect. The instructor that we have is a heli guy and is pretty rad. So all in all, its been a good few months.
  8. Best to you Kevin and Congrats on the flt test going so smooth, or so i hear... As for Premier, I can also personally attest that it ranks in the top schools out there. I base that on the fact i have attended at one point or another (including fixed wing flying) four different schools over time and Premier came on top. While I remember being lucky enough to have flown and been taught by truly experienced high time guys with lots of hours and stories to tell, Rob went the extra mile. He is passionate about helicopters and unwilling to compromise on safety (the attitude one should have towards it) . What Premier did that very few schools will ever do for you, is "after service" . Rob has helped me in countless other ways while looking for work after i got out with that 50,000 dollar piece of paper, and he was always helpful when i needed to get advice or opinion. In that sense, Premier is more like a membership. Now feel free to pound, that is just the way forums are... bm
  9. Sounds like you learn to fly with Rob W. when he was at Chinook. A great guy, calm and didnt say much at the end of the flight, just: " i really liked how you did this ____________ today" and then " you go home and think about how i did this ____________ (Fill in with maneuver) bm
  10. Cole, in ma case, i just had to come out on vertical to give a thumbs up to Rob. Great oufits need and desserve one to get started. That said dont believe everything you see on the net and go make a road trip to check out the schools. As far as location though, anywhere in the lower mainland , spring summer and fall is a fabulous place to learn to fly. very memorable. I have done some hours back east and as far as scenery and challenge, BC 's got it. Now ya'll can start shooting... bushman
  11. Cole, i think it was i am responding to... No Bushman and Rob are two different people . I am bushman and I did most of my training with Rob , including the last 28 doing an operational course with him. That still dont make me a real operator but i am getting there.... As far as Rob's instructing is concerned though, i can tell you he is in the top 5% in his trade and GSKY is a top machine, very clean inside and out. Dont be so paranoid, Premier and all the other schools mentioned here (at least the ones in the lower mainland) are within 45 minutes of each other, maybe a bit more if you drive all the way to Chilliwack, and they all are brick and mortar outfits, all it takes on your part is a little bit of driving and you'll be able to pick the one that fits you (if you or any other on this thread are looking for a school that is) And one other comment i wanted to make, this time about the coffee always on... Yes the coffee is always on ... but Rob drinks most of it.... truck on... stephan
  12. Wobblewing, I will second your comments on Premier. Rob is building a first class outfit and he is putting all his passion into it. Top instructor who is trying to show you how to work and operate the machine as well as fly it safely. As far as price is concerned, it is all relative. 500 an hour may seem higher than other operations in BC, but it is really the value you have to look for, not just a nominal price. Pitt airport is close to the mountains, and therefore you save a few minutes on the way out and a few on the way back and at close to 8 bucks a minute, no matter how you slice it, the money you save compare to a school further away from the training areas is substantial. There are a lot of other positive things to say, but anybody can look on Premier's website and compare, do their own homework and visit a few of the schools and then make an educated decision. What I can tell people is that Rob always puts his students first, calls it as he sees it and is adamant about safety. bushman back east
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