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bleed air

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  1. Amen to that. Hello?...Transport Canada?...are you listening??
  2. ...especially when they have those conditions...perfect weather, fine brushy fuel, little or no wind, flat ground, very nice equipment (what are the chances of seeing a set-up like that up here?)... they can have things go sideways like everybody else too...just Google "Cerro Grande fire". I'd be surprised to see the sh!tshows make the promotional video clips.
  3. Interesting read, indeed. Thanks, Splitpin. Anyone out there train autos in the 407 with a ski basket installed? If so, how successful are you at getting the thing slowed down to that “zero ground speed” mentioned in the article? And if successful, what works best? Cheers
  4. GW – you’re absolutely right, it’s a little over-the-top to be in the camp category. (My apologies, I suspected that photo might derail the thread but I couldn’t resist.) Twinstar – yup. 3BX2 – nope…(not yet!) OK..back on track, everyone!
  5. Production Pilot - capable of performing a repetitive activity safely and efficiently. This might be another thread, but the definition I've always wondered about is what is meant when anyone uses the term "professional" with regards to a commerical helicopter pilot.
  6. "online scanner" Wow, I had no idea such a thing existed (ok, ok, so I live in a cave!). Watch what you say on the radio, gang. The whole world could be listening!
  7. Good discussion, folks. Thank you. I'd like to add a little clarification if I may. Skids-Up – “Surely we realize that if we do not know what the charts say, it doesn't matter where they are...” Absolutely True! Chopper_guy – “Who cares where the performance data is located? Performance data is REAL. Any pilot who ignores the hover-out-of-ground-effect chart in the mountains, or anywhere, is flying in uncharted waters. However, everyone who has flown drills knows that all kinds of crap gets added after the first loads. You can get an overgross load up under good conditions, not learn that you have a tiger by the tail until it too late to put it back down, and be way over your head putting it down under bad conditions.” Also True! CJM91 – “As for the performance charts, it shouldn't matter where they are. The Gross Weight limit is already in the Limitations Section. I don't think that the Performance Charts could be considered limiting as there are other local site variables that are difficult to quantify or change from load to load (wind, humidity, etc.). They certainly should be a guide, though.” Agreed. However, after several years of conducting PPC’s , it’s been my experience that most if not all reasonably experienced pilots can quote the TQ, Temp and Gross Weight Limits almost in their sleep, but given a fairly straight forward scenario where a weight & balance calculation and check of the performance chart is required…well,… it often turns into quite an exercise. We seem to know the Limitations Section like the back of our hands (if we don’t, we should!) On some level, most of us have some understanding that by exceeding the numbers in the Limitation Section we are doing something wrong, if not illegal, and that there could be real consequences if things should go sideways. So, would it hurt then to put the performance charts in the Limitations Section? Maybe more of us would then realize that 200+ lbs over gross and 500+ lbs over HOGE is really not a good place to be. That way we wouldn’t have to rely on the machine to “talk” to us because, apparently, some of us are still not getting that message.
  8. I dislike being regulated as much as anyone but I've often wondered what would happen to our accident rates/statistics if the performance charts were moved to the limitations section (Bell manuals). Thoughts?
  9. Hey Banoy...I thought you were supposed to have your eyes closed when you were dreaming!!! Good luck with that plan!
  10. If you can get your hands on the triangular shaped flat plate off the end of a scrapped seat belt assembly, add it on to one of the attachment points for the existing seatbelts between the outside and middle seat. Some disassembly/assembly/longer bolt/AME blessing/supervision required. It will provide a solid attachment for a climber's locking carabiner. I know, I know, it's not approved, but it's a reasonable solution in a pinch. Good Luck.
  11. Anything in the Koala's RFM Limitation Section regarding aerobatic maneuvers? Any of you Skyline guys out there that can enlighten us? That dude's aircaft might be toast like the cowboy in South Africa that looped the 407! Bloody expensive adrenaline rush! :shock:
  12. As it appears that this thread has degenerated into the usual Bell vs Eurocopter debate, I won't worry too much about being slightly off topic. I'm the first to admit that I don't know jack about Astars but I think somebody was giving me a bit of a sales pitch when they told me their average cruise speed is 140 miles per hour. I would appreciate it if those with experience on the B2 could tell me (honestly) what their "average cruise speed" really is. Thanks!
  13. Alpine, out of Golden, of course, and I'm pretty sure that Bighorn out of Fernie does the Class D mountain rescue for Waterton Nat'l Park.
  14. Whoa! :shock: Getting dangerously close to the flatlands out there on the eastern slopes, aren't ya, 407D?
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