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Earp

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About Earp

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  • Birthday 05/25/1983

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  1. that's not a quick question I found a deal on a used helmet while I was in training, a Gentex HGU-56. It has a flex mike and dual visor... works great except for headroom in the 206B. I'm 6'2" and it's kinda tight, no problem with the Robbies though. I just didn't want to spend $1500+ before I really knew what I needed or would use. That being said I've tried a Gallet and loved how thin and lightweight it was.
  2. Maybe I didn't do as much homework as I thought before spending my training dollars... :eye: my only other suggestion is quantity. I forget the name but a company in Florida was offering the same type of deal and had close to 100 R22's. Very good question though... are there any operators who could shed more light on the question?
  3. Just wondering if anyone knows of a helicopter connection to REGCO Holdings Inc., operators of Porter Airlines, and owned by the Deluce family (Air Ontario). Long story short I may have a connection with the family, just wondering if it was worth pursuing. Thanks all!
  4. check the fine print... is the $200 part of a course? What are the extras? For most part the cost per hour in Canada includes the ground school, books, instructor, fuel, insurance, and aircraft. I'd make sure that after the hour in the air they don't give you a hefty bill.
  5. Hi Tim... the machine I saw was identical except for having a red belly. Nice pic though!
  6. Quad18star I'll give it to you straight. Since you are 24 and have "done the college route for a couple of years" I'm assuming your actual job experiences are minimal. I'm 24 myself and started working full time right out of High School, and have done some of the sh*ttiest jobs out there. But whatever job I was doing (most I didn't like) I would give it my all, whatever needed to be done I did it... even if it wasn't what I was hired to do. My bosses took notice and gave me training, promotions and pay raises. To date I have close to 10k worth of tickets, licences and training for doing more than just "what I was being payed for". Paying my dues really payed off. Due to both insurance and customer demands low hour pilots are usually looked at as expensive investments to the operator, this is why those willing to go above and beyond are given the opportunities over those who aren't. I was making pretty good money at my last job but I wasn't happy. My dream has always been to fly helicopters ever since I took my first ride as a kid. I finally decided to go for it and took my training... I've never been happier! All the pilots here are flying because they couldn't imaging doing anything else... that is the only PRO needed. As for the helicopter industry itself, it is a slow moving antiquated beast. (I know I'll pay for that :shock: ) Compared to the HUGE money mining makes, helicopters are a high cost low profit business, as such heli drivers are payed less than those working in the mines or in the oil patch. Most of the training is on the job for heavy equipment drivers and cost per hour is so much cheaper than helicopters, that's why the cost difference is so high. The reason I decided to be a helicopter pilot wasn't for the money, or the incredible places I'd see, it was because when I took my second ride 2 years ago I couldn't stop smiling for a week. I knew that no matter the cost of training or the hard work ahead, the ability to fly for a living would keep that smile on my face! Wishing you a bright future, Earp
  7. "was it mostly white with red stripe?? " -yes "I saw it fly directly over my house in London about 2 or 3 months ago headed south. I always look up when I hear something coming and that was not what I expected at all. Quite a sight indeed." -that sounds like the same machine
  8. Thanks all! I think it was C-GIMO but couldn't find any pictures... there wasn't any blue on the paint job like the McMahon Helicopters. That was the first S-58E I've seen flying and it looked like a flying piece of history. :up:
  9. Thanks sirlandsalot you described what I saw, although C-GIMU has been an S-76A since the early 80's, and now is with CHC I believe. If anyone else has seen the S58 or can remember what company it was working for please let me know.
  10. Just wondering if my eyes were deceiving me, but I thought I saw an S-58 with red and white stripes flying lower level just north of London, Ontario today. Time was about 19:00 Z, June 29... any insight would be much appreciated.
  11. Although given all that, I've been told that most customers will give the co-ordinates to where they want to go. So I guess that lat/long and UTM's on the GPS are required for quick departures but you should always have a map set up just in case.... like I said before if I was only using the GPS to Earlton, and was with a customer on their dime... I would've been given my walking papers! Again, just my thoughts
  12. I just graduated and during my long cross-country my instructor told me to tune in the GPS for emergency use only. I was flying by the map to CYXR and knew I was close to the zone, I looked at the GPS to get the exact distance and it read like I was in Sudbury.... before you ask it was set correctly. Ever since I don't trust them... if a pilot can't fly with a map and do the calculations in their head then they can't really fly, can they. Just my thoughts...
  13. I've recently graduated and am a 100 hour wonder myself... although without the attitide. If you were going to spend $50,000 on anything wouldn't you do your homework first? I was more than aware of what a newbie should expect after only 100 hours. There is no excuse for these whiners and I am thankful they are quiting the industry. I hope all the Chief Pilots out there drop these fools and make room for the motivated, hard working aspiring pilots who are willing to do whatever it takes to make it in their dream career! Before I chose my training school I took a visit to my top 10, I found 3 types of schools: 1) Those who promised the world, but didn't give any references to back up their claims, 2) Those who wanted my money to supplement their slow winter season and are what most pilots call "factories" and, 3) Those who are dedicated to training the next generation of pilots, and expect a level of quality they would expect in their own pilots. (This type comes in both big and small sizes) I think the problem is that people buy into types 1 and 2 and expect the world when they receive thier freshly minted CCPL. And to all the CP's out there please do the industry a favor and fire the whiners, there are those of us who have the right attititude and just need help getting our foot in the door. Wishing you all the best for the future... :rant:
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