Jump to content

RedRag

Member
  • Content Count

    40
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by RedRag


  1. I think we all balance multi-bladed helicopters. Haven't had the honor of working on a single bladed head...Sorry had to take that shot.

     

    Agreed on getting involved with dymanic balance by committe. If I have the chance, I'll go off in the corner by myself.

     

    Granted the best ride doesn't always come from the blades being in perfect track. The 407 really goes faster if you take the time in the ground and hover runs to get the track within a couple milimeters total spread. They might not end up there at VNE but to not doing it usually causes you to start chasing yout tail.


  2. The 407 can turn into project to get balanced. I do the ground (35%Q) runs until the track is dead on. The do the same for hover. Seems like overkill but it works. Make sure the PC rod ends are centered top and bottom on the threads. More than once I've run into runing out of threads and had to start over.

     

    You'll hear "roll against tab" on this head you have to do it sometimes (tab up/Pc Down) to get the right effect of the weight.

     

    If it starts turning into a marathon session and you cant get either low speed or high speed to both come below limits, start looking at the corner mounts and restraints. One nice thing is that once it's balanced it really never goes out unless one of the elastomeres starts going south.


  3. I've run both IPS and Filters. I'll take the filter everytime. The losses just having the particle separator panel installed make the engine run hotter. Over time that's what kills the turbine wheels. As far as getting dust out of the air, the IPS gets big stuff but light sand still gets through and eats the compressor. Worst thing is when you need to run the bleed air for the discharge, is just when you need the power and have to shut it off.

     

    Pulled off the IPS on a 407, installed the AFS kit. Instant jump of +15 on the powercheck. Also I'd watch which filter system you buy. The FDC kit terrible to clean the filter on the 407, plus you have to use their oil. NO going to the auto parts store and getting K&N, which sucks if you're in the field. With FDC you also can not use snow baffles, nice to find out after you install the kit.

     

    One drawback to all of them is having to carry a spare filter which is expensive.


  4. Here's my spin on this. We have so much gee whiz stuff installed, we finally ran out of room in a 407. There is zero space for ANYTHING. What drove this was people going to trade shows and coming home with all the new great ideas. We have stuff installed that half the people here don't know how to operate!

     

    Add to that the never ending ICA requirements and support from some of the companies that make the "gee whiz" had to have it stuff, sucks.

     

    Two years ago things changed..finally. Maintenance and pilots got to say what goes in. New gee whiz stuff requires that something gets removed. Want satcom, fine pull out the CD player.

     

    First upgrade was AFS filter, power margin jumped about 20 degrees. SWEET! New cargo hook, changed all the exterior lights to LED lights no more changing light bulbs.

     

    Personally, I like to spend money on spares. As for glass cockpit, on a utility helicopter is like dressing a hooker in a prom dress. An expensive prom dress!

     

     

     

     


  5. The 407 head is a strange one. I've balanced a lot of helicopters but, the 407 seems to do some strange things. Even with the "new" mast that eliminates the middle cones and reduced the chance of the hub shifting. Not sure why some of the moves work....

     

    Dana should know where the polar chart that Jim Fackler made about 15 years ago can be found. I have a copy somewhere, it makes sense out of some of the moves. Never been a big fan of the RADS.

     

    On the 407 I usually get some chicken feet, a bat wing and some goat blood, toss with the head weights and see what happens. I don't understand why the moves seem to be so much different than the 350. Both are similar heads.....(fiberglass and rubber)


  6. My rule for all 250's is a chip on an upper plug is far worse than the lower. The lower one will catch any thing from the engine gearbox and there are lots of possibilities.

     

    Upper one, is bearings. Can be real bad real fast. If the #1 bearing makes metal, it ususally comes apart pretty quick and there goes the compressor. IF the chips or chunks are bronze coloured on tne upper plug, look at #1 bearing.

     

    Good thing about the upper one is that you can figure out where the metal is coming from pretty easily disconnecting the return lines and cranking the starter.

     

    We only run one plug on the bottom, the ones that plugs in from the side, the bottom one that faces ths deck is a pain in the *** to get in and out.... both are in the same oil galley

     

    Red


  7. Watch which one you get. There are three out there. The two older ones with the turn buckles have different thickness ends that fit on on the shaft. The new one with the white plastic blocks and wing nuts doesn't work on older shafts. Not sure if there's a -# shaft that corresponds to a tool or not.

     

    For what the **** shaft costs, Kamatics ought to give you one with the driveshaft.

     

    I "know a guy" that had to use nylon tie down straps once......


  8. On the older 109's (A, MKII, C's) have a really good sheet metal guy handy. The tail boom and most of the structure seems more prone to cracking than most airframes I've delt with.

     

    Wiring in between the gearwells is usually a greasy mess that needs replaced. Not sure how the support is in the Sperry autopilot electroncs is anymore.

     

    If you're operating somewhere with lots of rain or snow, the tail rotor always seems to need balanced. Actually the tail is maintenance pig. No elastomerics, all shims and seems to get chewed up.

     

    Gearboxes are solid, head spews 30 weight oil so get dark shirts! It's not a Bell or Eurocopter you'll always be tweaking on it to get it thru until the next 150 hour. It really needs attention so I'd have one engineer assigned to take care of it all the time.

     

    Don't think you can get an IFR twin any cheaper, but it really needs a good bit of maintenance. Been away from them for awhile, not sure how the parts supply is anymore.

     

    Hope that helps...


  9. Tried MxManager from Conklin/DeDecker. Not real user friendly, too much button pushing and it doesn't make sense. (at least mechainc sense)

     

    Still using a homegrown excel spreadsheet, works well, easy to update. If there's a problem, I caused it and can fix it. Usually....

     

    Skybooks should be real interesting. From what I hear Bell may require it for warranty on parts from new ships. Not sure if it's that's true or not.

     

    Red


  10. I agree it depends on your budget both of money and space in the ship. Also what's the mission? Metro stuff or covering a more rural area. A basic set up would include some tactical radio set up (NAT, Technisonics..) searchlight

     

    I'd agree with a moving map system integrated with a, IR and DV camera and recording gear. Works great for evidence and even better for submitting video to the news to justify the program.

     

    NVG's, and a proper instrument panel that's certified for goggles.

     

    What I've seen is usually overkill on the gadgets, SATCOM with text messaging, Rappelling kits, (when nobody repels), litter kits that weigh 500 pounds, LOJACK, loudspeakers nobody on the ground can understand (but they have a siren...just in case you get into a pursuit?)

     

    As for down link, unless you can transmit to a every patrol car, the gear is always someplace else and the call is over when the van gets there that has the receiver, skip it.

     

    But thru the process you'll get 126 free coffee cups and 372 ball caps!!

     

     

     


  11. I don't think anyone sells them. Had to build the ones I have. Pretty easy, the hard part is findng a laptop that has a 9 pin connector on it! Haven't tried building a new one with a USB connection yet...

     

    I'm pretty sure it only uses 4 pins in each cable, so it's pretty easy to build.


  12. I'll second that on the ACES system. Went to the 2020 several years ago... Nice to sit in the cabin rather than stand in the rain when shooting a tail.

     

    As for hints on the 177, we used to add chicken feet, eye of a bat and a few bits of saftey wire to the correction. If you have a loose trunnion, you might want to consider somesort of sacrifice, maybe a goat to please the balance gods.

     

    A trick I used on the 177 or 192A was to keep a notebook on how much weight it actually takes to make a correction. On the 206L I want to say it was someting like 12gms/ip. Also, I had a "test weight" that I used every time. Painted it orange and it was heavy enough to get a good move line on the chart. Used it on the first run to get an idea how things were going to go.

×
×
  • Create New...