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dimit

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Everything posted by dimit

  1. Thanks, Wayne. Well said. I also think that anonymity should be the refuge of those with serious complaints and a genuine fear of retribution. On the other hand it's just an internet forum. There'll be idiots and wise a$$es and some wisdom too. What else should we expect? How does Pprune keep their conversations focused? Dick Mitten
  2. Whitestone, why so defensive? It's just a stupid internet forum, don't let it bug you! Since starting flying I've worked for (and with) lots of folks with big egos. I'm probably one of those "big ego" people! Nothing wrong with a big ego: it's probably a neccesary quality if one's going to tackle the risky business of owning or operating a helicopter business, let alone managing a bunch of prima donna pilots. I've always seen in them qualities that I respect. I haven't, and never will, work for someone I consider a douche-bag! Here's my "survival strategy": Treat yourself with respect, you're a professional with considerable responsibility and authority. Treat the boss with respect, after all she or he IS the BOSS! If you have to say no or be disagreeable do it in a respectful way. Don't worry if the other person has a hissy-fit, it's not your problem. Repeat as often as needed. Good luck! Dick Mitten
  3. Hi Daz, Right out of school I had the very good fortune to build fixtures, clean helicopters and do some scanning for Gemini. Then I got a job flying an R22 in the Ekati area for Stu Blusson, a very successful diamond prospector. That's me in the 22 in the Discovery show about Stu and Ekati. Todd at Gemini was extremely gracious about me bailing on short notice in the middle of the season! Flew 150 hrs with Stu and it was quite an experience... Hit 250hrs. Gemini hired me back the folllowing summer for an R44 contract. I flew about 200hrs in 8 months... TT 450hrs. The next season was with Airborne out of Rainbow Lk. Flew 2 weeks at Paramount Bistcho, 2 weeks outta Rainbow, and 2 weeks off. Those guys at Bistcho were something, let me tell you! Hit 850 hrs. Flew 2 yrs for Delta outta Lac La Biche. It was the "Hay Days" and I logged 1300 hrs there. These days? Sounds like Ralph @ Kananaskis/Icefields is one route. I've worked with several great guys who got their start with Ralph. Otherwise it's pretty tough to get to 500 hrs. I know that Gemini, Airborne & Delta still hire the occasional 500 hr pilot... A guy I know recently spent a year ground crewing and now the company is giving him a 206 endorsement and PPC so that he can work for Ralph and build his time. No easy answers I'm afraid... Best of luck, Dick Mitten
  4. $42. I want those government per diems... Holy smokes! DM
  5. 250 lbs/hr worked for me, too. DM
  6. The report is longish, but the conclusions are striking and worth the read. Deepest respect for the pilot, who got to the ground safely from such a difficult situation! TSB Report Cheers, D Mitten
  7. 47: Haven't tried the 70-80kts-level-read-the-ball diagnosis technique. I wonder if 70-80 is the point on the power curve that matches hover power, as referred to by AV8? AV8: 206B3 Vy is 52kts. Who else can weigh in with a stuck pedal diagnosis method? Thanks all! DM
  8. Thanks, AV8. That link leads to a nice presentation on power. I understand your point to be that the T/R power required at ~60kts may be similar to that required at the hover. What confuses me about this is that ~60kts is around the bottom of the JR total power required curve. M/R Tq is significantly lower at ~60kts than in the hover, PLUS there's the tail fin effect, so less T/R should be needed. In fact, hovering a JR at gross weight requires positive power pedal setting, whereas cruising at (basically) Vy requires a neutral or perhaps even slightly negative power pedal setting. What have I missed here? Thanks, DM
  9. I've heard of and tried a variety of methods for "diagnosing" a high-power, neutral, or low-power stuck pedal. Personally, on a JR the method I've had best results with is to fly at 60 mph and see how much Tq is required to centre the ball. If it's more than hover Tq it's high-power, less than hover Tq is low-power. Then I have a better idea of what to expect at the bottom end of my approach. I don't really know why this method works, though. At 60 mph the tail fin is working pretty hard, when hovering it ain't... Makes me scratch my head and wonder. I've tried this method in an Astar at 60 kias and it turned out that the indication was quite wrong. What method do you prefer? Why do you like it? Can you explain why it works? Look forward to your replies, DM
  10. I've heard of and tried a variety of methods for "diagnosing" a high-power, neutral, or low-power stuck pedal. Personally, on a JR I like to fly at 60 mph and see how much Tq is required to centre the ball. If it's more than hover Tq it's high-power, less than hover Tq is low-power. Then I know more of what to expect at the bottom end. I don't really know why this method works, though. At 60 mph the tail fin is working pretty hard, when landing it ain't... Makes me scratch my head and wonder. I've tried this method in an Astar at 60 kias and it turned out that the indication was all wrong. What method do you prefer? Why do you like it? Can you explain why it works? Look forward to your replies, DM
  11. Sorry to hear that... Frikkin' paperwork! DM
  12. LII; An advanced member indeed! I salute you. DM
  13. P5, After turning 40 I became a helicopter pilot. Clearly the joke was on me! Sorry for the thread drift, but I had to say it!! Cheers, DM
  14. Hi Mr. Mike, You asked if low flying was a bad idea. Well, like so many things, it depends. The basic law says that if the machine is over a "built up" area (houses, etc.) it's gotta be the higher of: 1000' above the highest obstacle within 500 horizontal feet of the helicopter; or high enough to make a safe autorotative landing. Then there are some exceptions to the rule, and ways to become an exception, and so forth. From a practical safety standpoint it's said that the helicopter pilot has only 2 true friends: altitude and airspeed. When things get pear shaped the appropriate combination of those 2 factors is critical for a safe outcome. Personally, I like cruising at a coupla grand AGL, though there's any number of situations when that's just not feasible. The machine you saw was low, but moving fast; not the optimal safe flight profile, but a heck of a lot better than low and slow! So without more information I can't say if the pilot of the 120 you saw was being "bad". If you're really concerned, do as has been suggested already: contact TC and let them sort it out. Hope this more fully answers your question, Dick Mitten
  15. Very interesting, Freewheel. Thanks for keeping us posted! DM
  16. My biggest fear is having the airline lose my work gear, so I bring the really important stuff as carry-on. This includes my helmet, flight suit, charts, GPS, computer, flight ticket books, important documents, and stuff like that. I travel in my work clothes, wearing my work boots. If my checked luggage gets lost I can buy, beg, or borrow enough other stuff to get by. I check 2 pieces of luggage at around 50 lbs each in the winter, including insulated coveralls, winter boots, sleeping bag (year round) and a decent tool kit. I'm lucky to be one of those people who can by for a month with a couple of changes of clothes, extra socks and undies, and regular trips to the "laundry facilities", whatever they may be. In the summer I've got an inflatable life-vest in one of my checked bags, and I always take that bag to the oversized baggage screening myself. The CO cartridge in the vest seems to cause them some grief. Newfie, sounds like you've got a sh!tty commute. That sucks!! Hope you find a way to smooth things out... DM
  17. Congrats, Phil! I look forward to having a read. Dm
  18. KO (Chinook Helicopters) "disciplined" me in the basics of mtn flying. Learning from KO is quite something, let me tell you! Some of the approaches I flew with Andy (Roe, Chinook Helicopters) were quite unconventional and not in any of the books I'd read, but they made sense and they worked. He opened my eyes to some unlikely possibilities while forcing me to be more critical of my planning and precision. Thanks KO and Andy! Thanks also to Uisdean and his most excellent crew of training pilots for the many mountain flying tips, tricks, techniques and pointers passed on during recurrent and heli-ski training. Nothing can compare to good instruction, coaching and mentoring. D Mitten
  19. My employer does a lot of work in the energy sector in N. Alberta, where pilot minimums are dictated by the customers' aviation consultant. It's hard to find enough 1000+ hr pilots for the 206s and 1500+ hr drivers for the A*s, so the boss does hire foreigner contract pilots from time to time. The "guest" pilots don't get paid less, but they are keen for longer shifts because they're just here for the summer and want to make as much $$$ & hrs as they can. Some of these folks come back for several seasons. One of them flies tours (among other things) around Mt Cook in a Twin* during his 6 months in Kiwi land. If you're a pilot with 1000+ hrs total/50 hrs 206 or 1500+ hrs total/50 hrs A*, no accidents/incidents in the last 2 yrs, and want to work for a medium sized, financially secure operation pm me with your name and particulars and I'll pass them on to my chief pilot. I think he's still looking for drivers for this year. You won't be following in the footsteps of Franklin or MacKenzie, but you'll fly good equipment with a great bunch of people. Cheers, DM PS. My employer doesn't have enuf work to bring someone up from 100 hrs. The very best of the low timers who work in our hangar sometimes have the "opportunity" to go fly tours for Kananaskis for a couple of seasons, until they get to around 500 hrs. We almost always have someone clawing their way up from 500 towards 1000 hrs, but that too can take time.
  20. Thanks Freddie, sounds like a fantastic machine! The B2 will have to do for another year, soooooo sad... Merry Xmas everyone! DM
  21. Freddie, For those of us who haven't had the pleasure, what makes the Kmax such a great machine to fly? Merry Xmas, DM
  22. Virtual reality in a full motion sim with real time video imagery and accelerometer data streamed from the a/c? All the action without the bullets, and home to the family at the end of the day. Where do I enlist?! DM
  23. Operating one of those would be part of a video-gaming solder's dream job! DM
  24. The best of the holiday season to everyone here! I hope that you and yours are healthy and happy where ever you may be. Sincerely, Dick Mitten Squish, BC
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