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ridgeline

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Posts posted by ridgeline


  1. 6 hours ago, J-Rock said:

    Here is a copy paste of the new standard.

    "An air operator shall provide Crew Resource Management Training (CRM) to flight crew, flight attendants, dispatchers/flight followers, ground crew and maintenance personnel, as applicable, in accordance with paragraphs (a) and (b) of this subsection."

    Notice it never mentions "crew member", it only mentions "flight crew". Very big difference(See CARS Part I Subpart 1). AC 700-042 also mentions that the intent is for persons employed by the operator, so that rules out fire fighters falling under the "ground crew" requirement as well.

    Just my opinion...

    Ya, you might be right. Nice one. I like how they opened with the definition of CRM and it clearly states 'crew members', however, we only need to be concerned with what comes after the word "shall" which is flight crew, like you pointed out.


  2. 5 minutes ago, Icewind said:

    Considering that only subpart 703 Air Taxi applies to passenger transport and that there are no 'passengers' on subpart 702 Aerial Work flights; only persons involved in the aerial work are to be on board, then it follows that they too fall under the CRM training requirement.  Yup - a big can of worms...........

    Thanks, thats how I was understanding it, I guess I just didn't want to believe it. Typical, a new TC reg, perfectly suited to fixed wing operators.


  3. I'm not trying to make the can of worms bigger, but just to clarify... For CRM purposes TC is only considering "crew" members to be those employed by the operator, correct? I only ask because according to their definition of 'crew member' the fire fighters I fly around looking for smoke are crew members, so are the guys doing the line patrol, the fire fighter hooking up the net, etc, etc. To say that all of those mentioned would have to take not only my operators CRM course but every operators CRM course that they fly with is well, you get the point.


  4. One of the best bits of advice I've ever been given was by a co-worker of mine when he looked at my resume. We were both in the process of looking for new jobs, and I had the flying job I had at the time, as well as all the other jobs I'd ever had on there. He said "you want to keep flying helicopters or build more decks and finish some more concrete? Get those other jobs off of there"  He was right.

    Don't offer your accounting skills, or your self proclaimed spatial awareness (whatever that is), or your fantastic physicality (whatever that is) to your future employer, you're trying to get a job flying, not a job as an accountant with good spatial awareness.  Pick up a broom, be willing to spill some fuel on your boots and wash other guys windows.  (not trying to be a prick here just my honest 2 bits...)

    Other than that, I second what Freck said.

     

     

    • Like 1
    • Haha 1

  5. Plenty of H1 certified helicopters around most elevated hospital helipads - maybe provincial ambulance services should stop being so cheap and use better aircraft!

     

    It has nothing to do with provincial ambulance services, in my opinion,... What about a local SAR team using a B2 to fly an injured snow mobiler out of an avalanche? If the guy is dying why shouldn't that Astar be allowed to land at the hospital?


  6. Hey there, does anyone know of a place in North America where I could get a screen for a 296? I bough a refurbished unit from a guy on eBay. The screen is being temperamental at best. I called Garmin, it's over the 90 day warranty AND they no longer carry, sell or make parts for these units and they won't repair them either (as of November 2014). I found a few places in China on google but it would be nice to have 'local' dealer for parts and repair!

     

    Thanks!


  7. What specifically did you find was poor about the quality Chopper Guy? Just curious as I'm looking at getting one myself. I talked directly to the dealer and from what he told me they sounded pretty good (obviously) but he also said they have a 30 money back deal... for any reason if a customer isn't satisfied they'll refund the helmet no questions asked.


  8. I worked for the taxable benefit place. Here's how it worked... Every month you would have $1000 put onto your pay check, get taxed on it, and have $1000 removed after taxes, E.I. etc. The house was nice.... but after it was renovated it had 10 bedrooms (very often all full) and 2 bathrooms. During the summer I was there the owner/operator imported/hired 5 mexicans (you can pay them less than minimum wage via some loophole, who also lived in the house sharing a bedroom and sleeping on the floor. There are reasons the front door there is a revolving one and its hard to find a Canadian accent in the place (housing is only one of them)

    • Like 2

  9. The problem we're talking about here in my opinion has nothing to do with schools. It's the government... I think everyone would agree on that. But on the school topic, I think there are a few things that could absolutely be changed to better prepare pilots just leaving school. For example, does anyone here really think that learning to use a 'whiz wheel' really prepares a new Canadian pilot for their first VFR job? I have a friend who is taking his license right now. He asked me if I thought it was a good idea to spend a couple extra hours and learn how to long line. I said no and explained to him that after 2 hours and a total of 102 hours, all he will associate long lining with is frustration. I did however say that if he could afford an bit of extra time, ask his instructor to go out with him sometime when the vis around 1 mile or so. In my opinion, that would be really beneficial to a new pilot. I know I would have liked to have actually flown in crap wx before I encountered it. Sure I had "company" low vis training... but we all know that training doesnt actually take place in low vis.

     

    On the GPS topic, schools have absolutely no obligation to 'teach' students how to use them (their role is to train students to fly without them) or an FM radio, or a Sat phone. There's already enough to cover. What they should teach, is that if you get into a machine and look around you and don't know how 1 or 2 of the dash ornaments work, you're the pilot and its your responsibility to know about the helicopter your flying around in! Every radio and GPS has a manual...for reading. And if after reading the manual, one still cant work it out, others are way more willing to 'mentor' knowing that the new guy tried to help himself first.

     

    only my 2 bits

    • Like 1

  10. Whitestone, Canada is a melting pot, unless you're from a "First Nations" background, you too, came from elsewhere. And give me a break...!!... Because we fly makes us no better than that person serving you your coffee or a 'goat herder' ... its a job, thats it!

     

    It is that it is a brutal industry to get into. Anyone who chose to get a license and didn't do their research prior... well, tough luck. As far as foreign pilots go, the first question most of them ask is "how much will I fly"... most Canadians ask "what do you pay, what is my time off" etc. Period!

     

    But more to the point, a check ride is a check ride... they tell all, and if they don't, perhaps the check pilot shouldn't be giving them. If a pilot walks in looking for work, and they meet the hour and skill requirements, they get the job, that simple.

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