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arctic_front

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  1. I heard it from one of the crew yesterday..... Not sure on all the details, but as stated above, it came from management. Lets hope nobody gets laid off or loses their jobs. It's all just iron and a change in paint colour. Plenty of work out there to keep them all busy and fires haven't started yet either. Carry on
  2. Yes, snark, it's all experience for sure.... but proper prep is also very important. Without the prep, you could come into work the next day and find all that expensive paint you worked so hard to apply laying on the spray booth floor like the shed skin of a snake. And that wouldn't be very funny at all.
  3. There are some good companies in PNG.. However, Pacific isn't one of them. The PNG licencing system is a mix of Aus and NZ so you need a lot of documentation to 'prove' your experience and training. Also, The Aussies and Kiwis that work in PNG resent the **** out of Canadians going there to 'steal' their work, as it were. The owner of Pacific is also the Governor of the province they have their head office...and he is as crooked as ****. Best to steer well clear of Pacific. PNG, on the other hand is a very interesting place. I'd go back again anytime. Best coffee on the planet too.
  4. A very sad day indeed. Some of the best people I've worked with in the industry I worked with @ Campbell. They were lie family.
  5. G0D **** it! Campbell has some really great people these days. I am very sad. Condolences to the Pilot's family and to the crew and management that has worked so hard over the years to keep their machines getting better and better. Campbell is a good outfit. A truly sad day indeed.
  6. There have been a few individuals who have 'graced' Campbell Helicopters over the years that left on bad terms, but as Splitpin has said, if you did your job, you had no issues with Bruce. B.C can be a crusty and grumpy guy but there is a few legends of his compassion floating around that few would believe if they heard about them. He was sometimes difficult to read and was a hard-as$ with some things, but he is also one of the few operators that still makes money year after year. I very much enjoyed working with the long-term crew that has been there over the years. The CP, for one, is a gentleman with few peers. I can say that the Production manager, although fairly young, is one of the best engineers I've ever seen. Watching him ram-rod a 212 transmission and head inner-fitting change in a dusty field this summer was the epitome of 'production' and his crew performed a minor miracle to have the whole thing done in 8 hours was pretty impressive. Kudos to M.H, E.A and the rest. job well done. There must be a reason why those individuals stay year after year if CHL is 'so bad'?
  7. I think the only way to save YXD is for the people of Edmonton to elect counselors who understand how important the airport is. 20-30 jet flights a day may not be appropriate now, but the small stuff is very important economically to the business world every single day. They need to wake-up.. Once that airport is gone, it will be too late.
  8. Wow... just wow! TC is now qualified to be MD's. Somebody needs to reign them in a bit. A Dr. is qualified to make medical diagnosis... TC inspectors not so much. Time for a letter campaign to the minister, don't ya think?
  9. ....against all odds, yes., all ok.
  10. A tower in poor viz? That sucks big-time. There are so many cell towers going in all the time... are they getting them listed with TC and being put onto topo maps? It would seem an impossible task to keep current with them for map printing purposes. A sad day indeed.
  11. I'm in Val D'or. I just arrived.. I'll look into it ASAP Thanks for the head's up. I hope everybody is safe and sound.
  12. I'll take that as being correct, as I have no experience with a 412. I'm guess that is a feature fairly unique however, as I think the 'typical' method is still engine oil pressure. Maybe the newer machines, akam AB139, 119 B4, EC145 ect have moved away from the old methods. I'm not at liberty to say. Until recently things have been pretty similar.
  13. I recall hearing from a few different sources that a 204B "can lift more than it can fly with" The explanation for that I'll leave to the experts, but it must have some basis in fact. Why you'd want to lift something you can't go anywhere with is a mystery to me. My understanding is that the rotor can lift it.. but the T/R cant steer it. seems kinda pointless. As for the statement from GWK, he is correct. However, the number of 205's in Canada with original blades is very small. Most have the 212 rotor system. A 212 rotor blade is a very different animal than a 204 blade. I will wager that there are many engineers/pilots who've seen 204/205 blades crack, shed bits and otherwise cause grey hair to appear. However, those blades were designed to take enemy fire in a war.. Was the 212 blade designed to be the same?... i think prolly not. apples and oranges. One thing for sure, you never want to see 96% NR on anything with a 212 rotor system... unless you are very light and doing an engine vibe check Outwest, however, is somewhat mistaken in practice, if not theory. Oil pressure inside the engine is how every turbine helicopter measures torque. They may do it in different ways, but it's entirely the measurement of engine oil pressure transposed to reflect rotor system load. Is that perfect? no.. is there a better method?... possibly. What does the industry use?... engine oil pressure.
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