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CrackedSpar

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CrackedSpar last won the day on May 5 2012

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  1. Gotcha. I do remember that now. They have been, and still are, very hot and horny to go and fly around in the fog while pulling the guts out of their machines. They would not be the first operator to run their machines at a loss in the hopes of establishing a presence in an area. From what I've seen, Stewart is rather cliquey, it's hard to just show up and go to work. Their eastern presence is not Mustang, but the other 'Coast to Coast' companies.
  2. Their wages are not top dollar, but they are not the bottom of the barrel. Where did you see them giving away a B2 for $900~/hr? As to of where the VIH employees go... Time will tell.
  3. I'm being honest. It is not sold. I don't know what is considered kosher to say, or what is considered to be proprietary/confidential. However, I can assure you that the company 'VIH Helicopters Ltd' has not been sold, as of earlier today. If another entity buys the company, I'm sure they will publicly announce it. Some may trash VIH, but the reality is they are a great company that works to a very high standard, and maintains excellent customer relations. If anyone acquires them, I'm sure they will be proud to publicly announce it.
  4. They don't have Rupert. They sold the base to HeliJet last winter. I'd imagine they parted that deuce as well, with no immediate work for it on the horizon and lots of more useful things to do with the cash that was tied up in it. I don't have first hand knowledge of what's going on inside VIH now, so perhaps somebody will chime in if they've seen that deuce around recently (I think the registration ended in 'VIY'?)
  5. Link to the PDF detailing contract requirements, if anybody wants to look. http://www.bcbid.gov.bc.ca/open.dll/downloadFile?sessionID=26227824&charID=20869983&disID=20867297&blobID=3139719&filetype=Blob I wonder who has bid? And with what?
  6. FDC calls for their own oil/cleaner, even though it's the same as K&N but blue. Don't become an audit finding!
  7. It's illegal anywhere that there is a road tax included in the sale of motor vehicle fuels. Likewise, running jet fuel is illegal in most places since it does not have this tax either. And if you really want to stretch things, guys who are running fryer oil are breaking the law too. If your tank gets dipped by a CVSE or similar official and they find dyed diesel, heating oil, jet fuel, etc in your tank they will fine you, and it is NOT CHEAP. Jet fuel is hard to tell though, since it's not dyed, I think they would assume you were just running a really good batch of diesel The lack of lubricity in the fuel is unlikely to affect the internals of a diesel engine. Most diesels are direct injection, and the fuel never sees the cylinder walls. Likewise, it doesn't matter, as the oil system is for lubrication; hence the multitude of rings on a piston, which carefully control the amount of oil that is left on the cylinder wall. However, an injection pump that is badly worn can result in a noticeable loss of power. It will be on its way out shortly after that; it's probably only going to be apparent for a few thousand Ks before the truck will no longer start.
  8. The problem was you were running Ford diesels, at least in regards to the power issues. A large segment of the performance diesel crowd runs Jet-A during competition. A1 (vs A) does not have any noticeable difference in performance, from what I've seen. Injection pumps are the primary candidate to be killed by jet fuel. Even a lot of older diesels should be running additive to prevent injection pump damage, since ULSD is severely lacking in lubricity compared to the old stuff. Some injectors also will not like Jet A, but that's pretty rare.
  9. Not going to happen. Marketing is going to sell the machine as being able to lift 400lbs more for the same price, in an effort to appeal to the customer and to prevent them from going with 'the other guy'. Then the other guy is going to throw a fast fin on too, but their marketing will use Bell's operating cost numbers to determine their bid, hence coming up with a 212 rate of $1200/hr. Shortly afterwards everyone involved will be going broke, but the actual owners of said helicopter companies (or, at least the sleezy ones) will have already sheltered themselves in off-shore accounts and shadow companies, so really the only people that will get forked in the end will be the employees. :punk:
  10. I'll add that Jet-B is not a good idea for a diesel. The cetane rating of it is much too low for use in a diesel, except for a multi-fuel engine (which can run whatever anyways, and unless you're driving a mil surplus 6x6 you don't have one). GM actually had a technical bulletin way back when about blending gasoline with diesel to improve cold starting. They retracted said bulletin shortly afterwards because it was contributing to the failure of their engines (which were already prone to failure at that point). That's about the same effect that you would get running Jet-B. Also, most modern diesels will love Jet-A, but you should run some sort of an additive. Two stroke oil or an actual diesel additive works (some are useless though, do your research) and there will be zero risk to the engine or its management systems.
  11. Where I work they just use CHRs. I don't see how you can make it any simpler, and there is no issue with it providing that the field engineer fills out the paper work correctly and send the lob pages/updated CHRs in every now and then (weekly works well). That and it makes it a lot easier if the log book entry indicates where the filter was last installed (IE, indicate it was off C-FAAA when you're installing it on C-FBBB, and if you're removing it serviceable for from C-FAAA for C-FBBB indicate that it's for installation on that machine/maint conv.) Oddly enough, we've gone to the 4500Hr life on the FDC filters, but have not changed the cleaning schedule... I really think they should just be OC/Annual; it's a bit of a pisser to be cleaning a perfect filter in the hotel bathtub because it did 100hrs of stopping nothing but snow. The hotel staff probably have similar thoughts.
  12. Sounds like they were blowing smoke because the bearing is undersized. Or they genuinely wanted to believe that the problem was an installation problem. It is, however, interesting to hear that. I think all of the 407s that I am familiar with would have the new style bearing, and they don't seem to be lasting either. And the Astar... Well, at least for the most part it seems the Arriel doesn't fail suddenly. But, I do seem to wind up changing a lot of modules early.
  13. #2 bearing failure was basically poor design. It could not handle the load imposed by the gyroscopic rigidity of the large® compressor. However, it could only fail catastrophically (or so they say) providing it happened to be one of a very small percentile of bearings (manufactured with the tolerances on both ends of the scale respective to both races or the balls) and if the aircraft was frequently being 'aggressively' maneuvered. Their definition of such maneuvers fell basically within the scope of normal flying in a utility environment; so with enough utility machines it was bound to eventually produce an abrupt failure. However, generally the failure is slow and will produce flakes for a while before it goes. In short, pull your chip detectors/plugs frequently, even if it is not required. ALF/Daily is a good practice of any aircraft with quick disconnect chip detectors. I believe the #4 bearings were on death row also because of poor design. I don't have any knowledge of what exactly Rolls Royce has to say regarding the subject.
  14. It's enough of a problem that there is an updated #2 bearing. I do not know if there is any intention to make the upgrade mandatory, or if they've ceased distribution of the old style bearing. Nothing is unbreakable.
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