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Shock to hear the news, having just been told a friend was killed in helicopter crash in LA yesterday. Condolences to all, its always sad news to hear of events like this.

I've read a couple newsreels on the recent accident on Santa Catalina island. Just wanted to say I'm very sorry for the loss of your friend, Nomad. <_< Very tragic.

 

As for the GSH accident, again, my condolences and a speedy recovery to the survivors.

 

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Imho, it's shocking we don't have legislated protection from post crash fires. That's two accidents in less than a month where fire has been a horrible contributer.

 

HEPAC, if you want a drum to beat, this might be a place to start.

 

Correct me if I'm wrong but I beleive all these higher safety standards exist and are available on all helicopters designed and built during or after the mid nineties. Only glitch is you have to be able to afford one.

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Correct me if I'm wrong but I beleive all these higher safety standards exist and are available on all helicopters designed and built during or after the mid nineties. Only glitch is you have to be able to afford one.

 

 

That's great. Except for two things.

 

One, we all know unless safety is mandated, companies are not going to shell out the extra money for these products and reduce their already thin margins in relation their competitors.

 

Two, how many helicopters percentage wise, in our fleet are of those vintages? Not many, and of the ones that are, see comment One. This is something at needs to be mandated across the board, equally to all. The customer pays.

 

This is 2008, why is it that lip service is still paid to safety in the form of 2000hr pilot minimums to fly lease site to lease site for example, when something SO BASIC as fire prevention/containment is completely ignored?

 

If the engine quits on a 500hr pilot or a 10,000 pilot over unforgiving ground, fire is an extremely likely scenario - install the tanks, end of discussion.

 

Won't happen though.

 

 

AR

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Any FAR or JAR 27 helicopter "designed" and built after the mid 90's has to have crash worthy fuel cells to get certified. This applies to all new (mid 90's and up) helicopters that are <7000 lbs and carries 9 or less passengers.

 

The approval process involves filling the tank to a minimum of 80% capacity and being dropped from a minimum of 50 feet with zero leakage.

 

Very strict requirements are also built in for break-away couplings, frangible or deformable structural attachments surrounding fuel tanks.

 

May not be the answer but is a lot better than sitting on the balloon bladder in the back seat which is going to absorb the impact of a hard landing, and very likely cause a fire.

 

Second tragic accident in as many weeks...my thoughts to all involved.

 

2007

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...to absorb the impact of a hard landing, and very likely cause a fire.

 

...over unforgiving ground, fire is an extremely likely scenario

 

2 very unfortunate accidents with fire involved. How many before now?

 

2 is 2 to many, but lets not start making it sound like every accident leads to a fire. Lets fly safe and use the safety measures we have and incorporate the news ones ASAP.

 

The loss of life is terrible and needless. Prayers and thoughts to all have lost loved ones.

 

K

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Any FAR or JAR 27 helicopter "designed" and built after the mid 90's has to have crash worthy fuel cells to get certified. This applies to all new (mid 90's and up) helicopters that are <7000 lbs and carries 9 or less passengers.

 

The approval process involves filling the tank to a minimum of 80% capacity and being dropped from a minimum of 50 feet with zero leakage.

 

Very strict requirements are also built in for break-away couplings, frangible or deformable structural attachments surrounding fuel tanks.

 

May not be the answer but is a lot better than sitting on the balloon bladder in the back seat which is going to absorb the impact of a hard landing, and very likely cause a fire.

 

Second tragic accident in as many weeks...my thoughts to all involved.

 

2007

 

crash worthy = good

crash proof = survival= priceless value

 

the problem i see is that the bladder type fuel cells are close proxcimity to the landing gear, and during bad accidents, the airframe is torn apart, taking with it the fuel bladder.

on the a-star with it's giant plastic tank, it's very succeptible to damage externally, even though it is protected within the bulk of the frame.

More can be done...why meet the minimum requirements when you can exceed them and save lives?

 

 

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  • 4 months later...

Apparently tail rotor drive shaft fail for now reason these days.

 

"Norman Wells helicopter crash not preventable: investigator.....Investigator Barry Holt told CBC News that it appears the helicopter's drive shaft in the tail rotor had become broken."

 

It looks like somethings don't change. Way to take the easy way out Mr. Holt. Im looking forward to reading the report when TSB releases it.

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