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Removing Structural Menbers In Flight (almost)


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What if the fasteners for the door posts were covered with something that required a special tool to remove the cover?

The special tool would most likely not be available on the side of a hill in a logging (or whatever) operation and therefore removing the door post with the blades turning would probably never happen.

I guess this would force the patient to be loaded in sideways across the seat as someone previously mentioned, but hey, they're in and headed for better medical atention than would be available on the side of a hill, right?

 

Now this is just an idea. I don't know the particulars of a 206 and these door posts but it's a possibilty, right? Someone can fill me in if this is completely impossible....

 

just trying to help out and provide an idea....

Murdoch

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just a thought, but if the guy is that bad, he needs to be medevaced off the side of the hill, it usually means he's needing conctant medical care....anyone care to tell me how a medic will fit into the back seat with the passenger sprawled out across the seats?

 

 

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When I got my first instruction on the 206 ambulance kit, I was warned to not only have the helicopter shut down, but to be sure that the skids were fully supported, that is flat on the ground, not sitting all wobbly. I was told, warned, threatened that I may not be able to get the door post back in place otherwise. The helicopter was under no circumstances to be started, let alone moved with the door post removed. These machines were mostly (all?) A models upgraded to B model drivetrains. Lighter, therefore flimsier airframes perhaps? Don't know, I still do it that way though and wouldn't do it any other unless recommended by the maintenance dept. and Bell.

 

I flew an old A converted to B a couple years ago, and I remember reading the litter-kit STC in the FM and it clearly stated: Rotor stopped, a/c on hard, flat, level surface and no ground handling allowed while the doorpost was off. Is the litter-kit STC different for a "native B-model" ? Another question: Is Bell the only litter-kit provider for the 206 ? Was/is it possible to have a machine that didn't come out of the factory with the litter-kit provisions already in to have them done at a later time ? The litter-kit provisions involve fairly important structural mods, from what I can tell...

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Another tool for you to use is a paper trail.

All the fallers that I work with are given a paper to sign that is kept. In it it states whether or not they are willing to be longlined out in the event of a serious injury. The document states that in this event, they and/or their next of kin will hold no prejudice against me, the company or any of our agents or family in the event that something goes wrong for any reason. They are free to refuse to sign this but if they don't they will not be taken out by any means that violates any restrictions.

Not bullet proof but it is something to consider.

 

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I flew an old A converted to B a couple years ago, and I remember reading the litter-kit STC in the FM and it clearly stated: Rotor stopped, a/c on hard, flat, level surface and no ground handling allowed while the doorpost was off. Is the litter-kit STC different for a "native B-model" ? Another question: Is Bell the only litter-kit provider for the 206 ? Was/is it possible to have a machine that didn't come out of the factory with the litter-kit provisions already in to have them done at a later time ? The litter-kit provisions involve fairly important structural mods, from what I can tell...

 

Our company has done that modification on several Jetrangers. Probably more than six, we had a bunch of A models but the mod has been done in the shop to a few B models as well. I've never been told that the procedure for removing the door post has been changed from the above quote. I haven't asked Maintenance for clarification, I'm pretty sure they would prefer I continue to use the same procedure. As for situations where it can't be done, well, I guess the patient has to be carried a ways, picked up on a line, or it ain't gonna happen.

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"just think what would happen if the structure failed and the xmsn came loose on a 206,"

 

"The most skilled pilot will have a very difficult time controlling a helicopter with a departing transmission."

 

Do people on here actually believe that leaving the post out is going to cause the transmission to depart? What we are talking about here is the potential to do damage to the aircraft structure. That same structure would have to be in extremely poor shape to have the transmission bugger off from just leaving out the door post. Should you fly without it? Absolutely not. Would it lead to a catastrophic failure? If so, you probably shouldn't be flying that aircraft anymore. <_<

 

"across the back seat he goes, with the doors tied shut"

 

Rather just pull the doors than trust a rope or my abilities to tie one. <_<

 

 

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Guest bag swinnger

The thought occurred to me that some of us haven't had the pleasure of landing on a steep slope logging pad, or have even seen one. so I thought I would post three photos of two random pads out of about forty pads that I have been working on for the past week.

The question being, should a machine be shut down on, or even a post removed in this vulnerable position? look at the second photo would you shut down on it?

It looks pretty good in that view.

Then look at the last one it's the same pad but different angle. I don't think I would shut down here, so if some one did need a medivac here the door and post would have to be removed on a Jet Ranger while holding some power and then,,,, Hmmm

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I flew an old A converted to B a couple years ago, and I remember reading the litter-kit STC in the FM and it clearly stated: Rotor stopped, a/c on hard, flat, level surface and no ground handling allowed while the doorpost was off. Is the litter-kit STC different for a "native B-model" ? Another question: Is Bell the only litter-kit provider for the 206 ? Was/is it possible to have a machine that didn't come out of the factory with the litter-kit provisions already in to have them done at a later time ? The litter-kit provisions involve fairly important structural mods, from what I can tell...

 

I have a BH 206B3 FM in front of me. Supplement-206B3-FMS-2 Litter Kits. Not a thing on the door post mentioned?

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I have a BH 206B3 FM in front of me. Supplement-206B3-FMS-2 Litter Kits. Not a thing on the door post mentioned?

Does anyone have/could post here Bell Service Instruction 206-68 ? ...or at least comment on wheather it mentions the door post?

 

Thanks!

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