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206 Question


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Was looking over the old 206 manual and managed to stump myself. It is in regards to having the same type oil in the engine as in the transmission. I know that the reason they are the same is due to the fact that the freewheeling unit is fed from the transmission and if it ever leaked the transmission oil would mix with the engine oil. However the question is why would they feed the freewheeling unit from the transmission to start with? And why not use the engine oil? The only thing I could come up with is that it either deals with the temperature of the oil or the pressure. Anyway I was wondering if anyone has the answer. :unsure:

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407 Driver, thank you for your explanation, and for limiting the references to farm animals to a minimum.

 

This photo has been seen here before in regards to C of G questions.......however, I think it may be appropriate here too.

My question for you, old wise and curly master, is whether this Donkey has "quit", or is it just "freewheeling" at this moment??

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Helicopter Primate, excellent picture.

 

This Donkey has not quit, it is merely resting. It has become inneffective, as it's 4 main drive-hoofs have become disengaged.

An Interesting question comes to mind, since the main drive-hoofs have disengaged, do you turn off the Donkey (with an AK-47) or leave the donkey at idle, ensuring the T/R control remains ???

 

What do you do? :D

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It would be interesting to know the internal temperature and pressure of this particular Donkey during this disengagement.

 

I suspect this would be affected by the Donkey's age, and Total Time in Fright.

 

To assess this Donkey's age, may I suggest an AME with experience on foreign models such as this (i.e. ####) should look up it's date !!

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It appears the two aft drive hooves are not free to freewheel, as they are partially impeded by the rear attachment strap. This can be serious, as it interferes with the flow of exhaust from the rear of the animal. Don’t stand behind it when you let it down.

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