Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 41
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

no offence to anyone but, i'm working in the mineing section in the states right now, and the american pilots really lack alot of skills, most are 2000-3000hr pilots with no bush experience. meet one guy with 2000hr, and has never, had a lone line on, done a toe in, oh and your going to love this, landed in a confined!!

all trafic watch, airport to airport. the US guys are good at, Punching loads off, getting the machine into LTE, and spreading #### all over the hill side.

 

what i think i'm trying to say is Canada is where it's at

 

Now lets not start a just helicopters forum bashing here. I have worked both sides of the border. There are a lot of good U.S pilots out there. I guess nobody in Canada has ever punched off a load or got into LTE. We have a lot of pilots in Canada that should not be flying and are unsafe, it goes both ways. Don't make it sound like all U.S pilots are bad.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Now lets not start a just helicopters forum bashing here. I have worked both sides of the border. There are a lot of good U.S pilots out there. I guess nobody in Canada has ever punched off a load or got into LTE. We have a lot of pilots in Canada that should not be flying and are unsafe, it goes both ways. Don't make it sound like all U.S pilots are bad.

 

 

Oh of coures it goes both ways, it just seems like there is more, pavment to pavment jobs in the states. and as far as the others stuff goes, i don't think it's the pilots fault for punching a load off or getting into LTE, it's the companies fault, for not enoughf trainnig and putting a guy in a position thats over his head.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

 

I'm new to the scene and am currently spending every spare minute researching all corners of the industry.

 

I have been leaning towards taking up my training in Canada, mainly because my UK pounds will get me quite far plus the scenery is amazing, visa'a are easier to obtain and the jobs available seem to be varied and interesting.

 

I also want to work in Canada after obtaining my CPL and figured that a Canadian employer would be more willing to take me on as I'd trained there.

 

BUT this discussion has got me thinking again, training in America would get me an extra 50 hours for the same money and then I could get a working visa for Canada and convert the licence.

 

What are your thoughts?

 

Thanks

Simon

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

No knock on Bob Reimer but there are a slew of fantastic instructors around (John Kennedy, Rob Wood, Craig Joiner, Cathy Press, Keith Ostertag, gerry Frieson just to name a few). We have some amazing pilots out there that are training the next group of guys coming up and they are improving their techniques every year.

The basics of controls are one thing but there is no replacing the experience that these guys pass on.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Pssst.... 412D is a Class 1 instructor.

 

 

Yeah.. But that's not the point.. Canada is short of instructors.. The US is not..

 

And if you look at the system in the US with a 200 hour guy teaching someone. It actually works, doesn't it?

 

Sorry for bringing this a little off topic.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So if the quality of instructors is very good in Canada but they are few and far between, where does that leave a newly qualified commercial pilot? The usual route in say America or UK is to become an instructor to build hours, is it possible to be an instructor with under 200 hours in Canada?

Link to post
Share on other sites

No. In Canada you must have 300 Hrs. PIC time before you qualify to begin training as an instructor.

 

You then must complete 30 Hrs. of dual flight time with a Class 1 Instructor plus an additional 30 Hrs. of ground school with an Instructor (Class 1).

 

After that you need to pass two written Transport Canada exams and fly a "flight test" with a Transport Canada examiner which will get you your Class 4 rating. From there you will need to be supervised by a Class 1 or 2 Instructor to exercise the privileges of your instructor rating. Once you have recommended 3 students to fly solo and 3 students to fly their Flight Test (they must achieve a full pass) you then become a level 3 flight instructor.

 

Once you become a Class 3 Instructor, you need to recommend another seven students for their flight test (they too must pass) and then you qualify to become a Class 2. To actually achieve the rating of Class 2 instructor you are required to write another written Transport exam and fly another flight test with Transport.

 

Finally when you have over 700 Hrs. of instructor flight time, you are eligible to become a Class 1 flight instructor. This requires another flight test and possibly a written exam depending on how you scored on your Class 2 written.

 

As a Class 1 instructor, you now have the privilege of training "new" instructors.

 

I generally takes about 2-3 years to climb to rank of Class 1 depending on your situation.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Ben

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...