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Low Time Pilots Out There

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For what it is worth ladies and gents, I do clearly recall the 100 hour syndrome and have worked my way up through the ranks. I know the focus tends to be on the logbook numbers and instructing in the US or anywhere may appear to be a fast track. I used to instruct myself but it was well after I had time and actually just did it in the off season from heli-logging but over the years have helped many low timers get their first "in".

 

I would suggest that many good companies would consider "industry ground time" more valuable than instructing hours (yes as uninspiring as that sounds). If you think about it, we are a service industry and if our development programs were to include a thorough understanding of the actual operation (from the ground up) along with direct exposure to the customer service aspect of being on the job, the more well rounded the pilot will be when the technical flying skills develop.

 

I hate to say it but this is one of those hindsight things. It took me quite a while to appreciate all that I garnered while doing the grunt work.

 

So it becomes a matter of where to focus your efforts. Truly the same old buzzwords have merit...initiative, attitude, people skills, team player and happy!

 

Likely not what you wanted to hear......and it is just my 2 cents!

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For what it is worth ladies and gents, I do clearly recall the 100 hour syndrome and have worked my way up through the ranks. I know the focus tends to be on the logbook numbers and instructing in the US or anywhere may appear to be a fast track. I used to instruct myself but it was well after I had time and actually just did it in the off season from heli-logging but over the years have helped many low timers get their first "in".

 

I would suggest that many good companies would consider "industry ground time" more valuable than instructing hours (yes as uninspiring as that sounds). If you think about it, we are a service industry and if our development programs were to include a thorough understanding of the actual operation (from the ground up) along with direct exposure to the customer service aspect of being on the job, the more well rounded the pilot will be when the technical flying skills develop.

 

I hate to say it but this is one of those hindsight things. It took me quite a while to appreciate all that I garnered while doing the grunt work.

 

So it becomes a matter of where to focus your efforts. Truly the same old buzzwords have merit...initiative, attitude, people skills, team player and happy!

 

Likely not what you wanted to hear......and it is just my 2 cents!

Remember,you have to have 150 hours to instruct in the u.s. and 200 hours to instruct in the r22 or r44. You will go to the bottom of the ple if you do not have your cfii also.

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You can only apply for a J1 if you have a PPL and 70 hours or less (officialy) sometimes the rules can be bend because the flightschool performs the check. There are very few instructing jobs in the US at the moment and it will only get worse.

 

With the right attitude you might pull it off in Canada and I would say stick to that.

 

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For what it is worth ladies and gents, I do clearly recall the 100 hour syndrome and have worked my way up through the ranks. I know the focus tends to be on the logbook numbers and instructing in the US or anywhere may appear to be a fast track. I used to instruct myself but it was well after I had time and actually just did it in the off season from heli-logging but over the years have helped many low timers get their first "in".

 

I would suggest that many good companies would consider "industry ground time" more valuable than instructing hours (yes as uninspiring as that sounds). If you think about it, we are a service industry and if our development programs were to include a thorough understanding of the actual operation (from the ground up) along with direct exposure to the customer service aspect of being on the job, the more well rounded the pilot will be when the technical flying skills develop.

 

I hate to say it but this is one of those hindsight things. It took me quite a while to appreciate all that I garnered while doing the grunt work.

 

So it becomes a matter of where to focus your efforts. Truly the same old buzzwords have merit...initiative, attitude, people skills, team player and happy!

 

Likely not what you wanted to hear......and it is just my 2 cents!

 

 

 

I wish it would be like that and 5000 hours ago I would have probably believed most of that. I’m not saying I’m right, just simple try to point out some options without knowing the full extent of the requirements for it.

 

All the replies so far suggest being a hangar rate for several years. Well, if you’re not willing to leave your country (if necessary) and convert your license or get a validation, then most likely your only option will be ground work.

"industry ground time" more valuable than instructing hours”. Who told you that BS!!! It sure helps if you know the company and all their in and outs, how to rig a load, fuel the helicopter, customer needs,… but it shouldn’t take years to figure that out.

 

Attitude, people skills, team player,… is definitely a key role, but what really counts in called PIC time. What good does it do if you don’t meet the insurance or customer requirement? Some of the Oil companies putting out some hefty numbers.

 

I’m sure you’re aware of the thread “work permit freeze” Let me ask you something, would you like to be the guy sweeping the hanger and watch the foreigner fly, make more money and all because he had some lousy hours from being a CFI or flew of a stinky tuna boat?

 

There are lots of pilots out there, but not all of them have done grunt work or at least not for very long. No offend to anybody who has gone that route, actually more power to them for hanging in there.

 

A few more examples: I know of one guy who went to Malaysia and flew photo, CFI, charter and other weird missions in a R22/R44 or another guy flew a R44 for a sultan in Indonesia. Not sure what it all entailed, but there is an old saying, “nothing ventures nothing gained”

 

I’m not trying to be a smart *** or know it all; I’m simply bored and throwing out some ideas.

 

Regards,

 

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Uhmmmm...okaaayyy....

 

What does a 150 hour pilot have to teach?

 

What kind of flying experience are they really working with?

 

I remember back in the day having 150 hours, and wonder how I actually survived it at times, let alone try to teach someone else how to fly.

 

I suppose if you are flying concrete pad to concrete pad it's safe enough, but funny, I don't recall seeing alot of concrete in my career.

 

huh...I dunno, maybe it's just me.

 

RTR

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Uhmmmm...okaaayyy....

 

What does a 150 hour pilot have to teach?

 

What kind of flying experience are they really working with?

 

I remember back in the day having 150 hours, and wonder how I actually survived it at times, let alone try to teach someone else how to fly.

 

I suppose if you are flying concrete pad to concrete pad it's safe enough, but funny, I don't recall seeing alot of concrete in my career.

 

huh...I dunno, maybe it's just me.

 

RTR

Well said RTR...

 

Dont mean to bash any of you low time "CFI'S" out there but really what knowledge and Experience can a 150 hour pilot pass on to a newbie, its the blind leading the blind. Im almost at 3000 hours and still dont feel like I know enough to be able to teach cause Im still learning lots myself and havnt done or experienced everything this industry has to offer i.e.. helilogging or heliskiing ect..ect..ect...

 

Nuff said guess I opened can of worms...oops..

 

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I wish it would be like that and 5000 hours ago I would have probably believed most of that. I’m not saying I’m right, just simple try to point out some options without knowing the full extent of the requirements for it.

 

All the replies so far suggest being a hangar rate for several years. Well, if you’re not willing to leave your country (if necessary) and convert your license or get a validation, then most likely your only option will be ground work.

"industry ground time" more valuable than instructing hours”. Who told you that BS!!! It sure helps if you know the company and all their in and outs, how to rig a load, fuel the helicopter, customer needs,… but it shouldn’t take years to figure that out.

 

Attitude, people skills, team player,… is definitely a key role, but what really counts in called PIC time. What good does it do if you don’t meet the insurance or customer requirement? Some of the Oil companies putting out some hefty numbers.

 

I’m sure you’re aware of the thread “work permit freeze” Let me ask you something, would you like to be the guy sweeping the hanger and watch the foreigner fly, make more money and all because he had some lousy hours from being a CFI or flew of a stinky tuna boat?

 

There are lots of pilots out there, but not all of them have done grunt work or at least not for very long. No offend to anybody who has gone that route, actually more power to them for hanging in there.

 

A few more examples: I know of one guy who went to Malaysia and flew photo, CFI, charter and other weird missions in a R22/R44 or another guy flew a R44 for a sultan in Indonesia. Not sure what it all entailed, but there is an old saying, “nothing ventures nothing gained”

 

I’m not trying to be a smart *** or know it all; I’m simply bored and throwing out some ideas.

 

Regards,

 

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Well Sherpa, actually no-one told me that bs.....I actually hire low timers now and those that I can't I share their names with industry friends that own companies...based on those very merits. And if you think a good employer is going to stick someone out in the field simply because they have the right numbers....well you work with the companies you want and I will mine.

 

I know it is a challenge and never should anyone sign on for years of gruntwork, however even though initial training is expensive it just isn't all inclusive and doesn't prepare an individual for the real world. And while I may agree that instructing will boost hours and also the fact that really what do you have to offer to the student, the selfish crux is what exactly is it experience wise that you bring to your employer? Certainly a higher level of auto's but you know I would by a long shot take someone that knew how to inspect and look after rigging gear, take the battery in and out of the machine in the winter, and can carry on an educated discussion with a customer over coffee.

 

Again, 2 cents worth but I practice what I preach.

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Thanks to all for posting. Athough I'am disapointed we did not get to hear any inspiring stories of Low Timers getting some hours this year. Good luck to all with employment next season.

 

HG

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