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Globe & Mail Article On S-92 Yesterday


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Guest Up&away

I agree Sikorsky screwed up on this and the aircraft should have been grounded untill they had the studs fixed. We do fly like they are going to fall apart. Why do we fly approaches and leave a way out. Cat A takeoffs, its a long list of the things we do in case of a engne failure or problem ect. We do these to give us a way out and to keep from having a accident should a problem arise. I would not want to be flying the S-92 off shore at 9000ft over a fog layer with zero vis on the surface and lose all gearbox pressure and only have 8 to 10 minutes to get on the water.

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I agree Sikorsky screwed up on this and the aircraft should have been grounded untill they had the studs fixed. We do fly like they are going to fall apart. Why do we fly approaches and leave a way out. Cat A takeoffs, its a long list of the things we do in case of a engne failure or problem ect. We do these to give us a way out and to keep from having a accident should a problem arise. I would not want to be flying the S-92 off shore at 9000ft over a fog layer with zero vis on the surface and lose all gearbox pressure and only have 8 to 10 minutes to get on the water.

 

Which helicopter would you want to be flying in the above scenario?

 

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Guest Up&away
Which helicopter would you want to be flying in the above scenario?

 

A helicopter that would give you more time before the gearbox seized. 8 to 10 minutes it not enough time in my book.

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"You're right cg, not good enough. However, I don't think most machines are much better.

A few years back we stopped for fuel (212) in Yorkton, Sask. for fuel on one of our cross Canada fire flaps. There was a Bell 205 sitting on the ramp with an oil covered tailboom. It seems that on short final the MBG oil pressure dropped to zero. Very shortly after landing the blades ground to a shuddering halt and pivoted the machine on the skids about 20 degrees. Total time from initial pressure drop to MRG seizure....less than 3 minutes!!!

Ever since I saw that I have always kept one eye permanently glued to the MRG gauge."

 

That is a quote from Splitpin on another thread. Altitude is good if an engine quits, not so good if a transmission (plus a whole bunch of other stuff) quits :mellow:

 

 

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Keep in mind that dry run testing is a function of initial certification of a new helicopter and the specimen used is usually one that was part of the certification flight testing. It has not had any overhauls, has not been operated for umpteen thousand hours, nor has it seen any abnormal power excursions in its lifetime. The actual test is done in a lab under controlled conditions. Just because a gearbox demonstrates a run dry capability for certification doesn't necessarily mean it will survive in the real world. That is why the flight manual usually says to land as soon as possible in event of a complete transmission oil pressure loss. Just my 2 cents worth. Take care and fly safe.

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