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Pilot Engineer


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Hi every one,

 

I am a long time reader first time poster.

 

Being a low time pilot it is very hard to get a job even without the current economy.

 

After knocking on 50 or so doors politely looking for employment i am realizing that it is just not going to happen this season.

 

I consider myself very lucky that i got a good paying job outside aviation.

 

But with a very strong interest in aviation have been thinking about going down the AME road by the time i am done school the economy should be better buy then.

Any ways guys just want some opinions from people in the business about the idea?

 

Do pilot engineers get jobs over just pilots?

Are they paid better?

Do they get abused buy the employer?

Are they respected for both jobs they perform?

 

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To respond to your questions;

 

You are trying to make yourself sellable to a potental employer, which is a good thing. There are Pilot/AME's out there, and I am sure they do well for themselves.

 

Some potental problems are: The PRM invests time and money into you as an AME, but your real track is being a Pilot. So the day will come, when you have some experience, that the CP and PRM will both need your services, and you will have to decide which road to travel...

 

To be abused by your employer? well that is your choice and your choice only. If an employer 'abuses' you and you stay, that is your choice... For now, Pilots have a duty day, where AME's there is no really limit, maybe that will change.

 

Pilot's need Engineers and Engineer's needs Pilots, kinda like peanut butter and bread.....One breaks the machine, the other fixes the machine...Since the first time a pilot started a machine there has been a need for AME's.

 

Pilot and AME's both get the respect they give.

 

With the duty time limits this can restrict you to what you can actually perform legally in the field. (fly all day and be expected to wrench all night, then fly again the next day?)

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You have already experienced what to expect in this industry without experience.

If you have the time and money, invest it in a profession that offers a job at the end of the day.

A job that has a future, for you and your family.

Back to school, take a business degree, start a business of your own then BUY yourself a R44.

Of course, if you absolutely must fly helicopters, join the army!!!

Nice equipment, excellent ongoing training, great relationships, see the world and stay in pretty good accomodations, good pay and then of course the pension after 20 years.

Then, when you get out at the ripe old age of (I'm guessing) 40 - 50 you will have a pile of heavy multi-engine IFR time with military training.

Now, you are a shoe in for a corporate job flying medium multi-engine well maintained helicopters.....or not....remeber that pension.

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I am a pilot/eng and I agree totlally with happyguy...you want to be the most hated guy in aviation...be a pilot/eng....the pay sucks...you do twice the work...and get little respect...chief pilot hates engineers...chief engineer hates pilots...go with the military and have a life...and the pension :rolleyes:

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Pottsy has some good points, but consider this: If you have an AME license and low hours as a pilot, it gives a perspective employer a reason to hire some one who has low hours for something other than painting fences and sweeping floors until you can build enough hours to meet their insurance requirements. In addition, if you are flying and for some reason lose your medical and want to stay in the business, it gives you something to fall back on. Nothing says that if you have an AME license that you have to wrench on a ship. My old friend John Flesher (who was a pilot/engineeer) used to say that you are a good pilot or a good engineer, but not both. Cheers and best of luck

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soooo, this sounds like the exact debate i was having with myself a few months ago. glad someone else asked it first ;)

i was wondering a few things though. they show pictures of astars and other aircraft in the hangers at the northern lights college, (this may be dumb) do they fly them aswell? or are these machines there specifically to be disasembled and reassembled? say if we were doing blade tracking, (or any number of things that i dont even know about) would we be alowed to start up the machine and log some of the run time? hmm, that might not make sense... whatever, you know what im asking right?

ive heard people coin the phrase "jack of all trades, master of none" , i just dont think i believe that, i personally dont see how learning more about the machine itself and spending more time and schooling with the aircraft will at all takeaway from your ability to fly it (unless you are giving up your flight time because you've already logged 9hrs wrenching...). i almost wish that there was a greater mechanical portion to the flight training that we got. if i had the finances in place i think i would take the course just for the personal knowledge.

And as for the military option, ouch, tell me thats not the best way to go flying?! shining your boots, saluting sergeants, shooting at people you dont know, being shot at by people you dont know... what a life. I cant speak for everyone, but i think if you join the military, its because you want to be in the military. And they will decide how you will be used in the military. that being said, i did fill out an application for pilot position with the CAF. but then i finished reading Chickenhawk, and figured i'll tough it out in the civi world :P

As far as bushwork goes, am i the only one that gets off on that kind of stuff (ok ok, i may be a little young at it, speaking too soon. will revisit this statement in 20yrs)? ive been working my first city job in 4yrs(?) for about 2 months now, and already im going nuts! send me out to the bush! take me away from the public! put me back in a camp! god dammit dont let me talk to the general puplic anymore! one more nattering old lady tells me not to get dust on her car (like come on people! we're renovating your house! there will be some cutting! the dust will fly! i will clean it! just GTFO of here and let me work!) and im going to loose it! haha, oh city life, not for I.

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There is absolutely nothing wrong with being a pilot engineer. Just don't ask too much of yourself, it take years to learn one trade albeit two. I have worked with excellent engineers that know how to fly, and one has to try and do what they can to be proficient. Only you can make the decision as to which or both you want to be. If it is to be a pilot you become an engineer then perhaps that is the wrong way to go about it. If it is to break into the industry and you feel that you have the mechanical apitude to be an engineer then go for it. You don't have to be a pilot engineer to become a poor pilot or bad engineer, you have to be dedicated and careful to do either or both successfully.

 

 

 

 

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I have a friend who thought about doing the same thing you are. He got his AME and was one of the best engineers I ever worked with. Within a few years, he completely lost interest in becoming a pilot after seeing how the industry was. He is now working towards law school.

 

I have another friend who genuinely enjoyed both aspects. He got his engineer and Pilots license around the same time and then drifted more towards flying over the years since most companies don't really make it worth your while to do both jobs. When the big economic slow down hit and he got laid off, he was able to take a job with a small company as the Director of Maintenance and he still gets to fly too. So it never hurts to have extra skills as long as it really is something you enjoy doing.

 

Just my opinion.

 

P.s. Go to business school, get filthy rich and just buy your own helicopter.

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Guest plumber
There is absolutely nothing wrong with being a pilot engineer. Just don't ask too much of yourself, it take years to learn one trade albeit two. I have worked with excellent engineers that know how to fly, and one has to try and do what they can to be proficient. Only you can make the decision as to which or both you want to be. If it is to be a pilot you become an engineer then perhaps that is the wrong way to go about it. If it is to break into the industry and you feel that you have the mechanical apitude to be an engineer then go for it. You don't have to be a pilot engineer to become a poor pilot or bad engineer, you have to be dedicated and careful to do either or both successfully.

 

 

Nicely said scully.

 

If you do decide to go that route I hope you take the AME side seriously.

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Guest plumber

QUOTE (Jet B @ Jul 16 2009, 08:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have a friend who thought about doing the same thing you are. He got his AME and was one of the best engineers I ever worked with. Within a few years, he completely lost interest in becoming a pilot after seeing how the industry was. He is now working towards law school.

 

I have another friend who genuinely enjoyed both aspects. He got his engineer and Pilots license around the same time and then drifted more towards flying over the years since most companies don't really make it worth your while to do both jobs. When the big economic slow down hit and he got laid off, he was able to take a job with a small company as the Director of Maintenance and he still gets to fly too. So it never hurts to have extra skills as long as it really is something you enjoy doing.

 

Just my opinion.

 

P.s. Go to business school, get filthy rich and just buy your own helicopter.

 

Hey Jet B if that buddy who is working towards law school worked for mustang he is a h3ll of a nice guy.

They let me use there heaters at the GP hanger to get my car started after a week of -40

 

Who would of thought that an airport in N.Alberta wouldn't have plug ins for block heaters.

 

To everyone under 30 years of age who is thinking of getting into flying, do yourself a favour, Get another skill under your belt other than a sandwich artist it will pay off eventually.

 

 

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