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???????????

 

Trust me

 

you had to be there to see it to believe it

 

 

You mean when he had to auto rotate due to fuel contamination causing flameout/ surging into a super tight confined area where conveniently a fuel bowser could drive to? And then got some more motion lotion and flew back to staging where he grounded the machine and then had the engineer look at it? Then everyone else got grounded untill full fuel samples could be taken confirming that they would also not wind up flaming out/ surging and have to auto rotate to where a fuel bowser could drive to so they could then fly back to staging and report the problem without getting engineering support to assess the machine for ferry flight???? Is that the one you are refering too????

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Really close Snarky

 

all you forgot was that one little detail about no functioning low fuel light but other then that you more or less covered it.

 

$944

$944

$944........

 

 

I wonder if the Forestry incident report on that one is available for review!!

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can someone lok into that and post it , maybe send that to ab forestry , and the districts 944 is working in to thier district managers , lets let forestry do this internally

it will come full circle ,, if everyone adds thier 2cents ,

as soon as enforcement gets into this i hope they ask for any info anyone is willing to supply , its all in the privacy act , Heck I saw there 205 both of them floating around in june with no engineer , from a to b to c to d hmmm sign out what oh ya a pilot can do that ,lol check the books pretty hard to have one engineer signing out 3 or 4 machines on the same day , in 2 or 3 provinces , lol

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Well it's not like $944 company has never had an incident. They have and can still hold a O/C, AMO and required Insurance. Yes one would have to question how. Just goes to prove the mighty dollar speaks. You can't say it doesn't how many on this forum have jumped companies because someone else is willing to pay more.

 

Don't get me wrong years ago in europe the tender process use to be you though out the lowest and highest bidders. The person that had the price in the middle was the winner.

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There was a time when commercial helicopter operators were required to submit their tariffs to the Ministry of Transport for approval. If in the opinion of the Ministry the rate was insufficient to sustain a safe and viable operation, the request was denied. The result was that rates were pretty much the same from operator to operator and customers based their choice of operator on the quality of service and machinery he provided and not his rock bottom price.

 

In those days, revenue was sufficient to allow an operator to send an engineer out with every machine including light machinery. This you rarely if ever see these days but it sure made it a lot easier to do a good job when two men accompanied every machine in the field.

 

Charters were difficult to get unless it came with the purchase of an existing operation. One machine operators were non-existent as were contract pilots. There were some fine operations in those days, Associated, Bow, Kenting and Okanagan to name four. I believe some of these had pension plans for their employees. They kept their pilots and engineers on the payroll year round. There was actually some job security in the business.

 

When aviation was 'deregulated' this state of affairs went by the boards, and it is arguable that we have more regulation now than we had then.

 

It has been previously suggested that Transport Canada reinstate approved tariffs. This would likely cost less money and improve safety to a much greater extent than SMS ever will.

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There was a time when commercial helicopter operators were required to submit their tariffs to the Ministry of Transport for approval. If in the opinion of the Ministry the rate was insufficient to sustain a safe and viable operation, the request was denied. The result was that rates were pretty much the same from operator to operator and customers based their choice of operator on the quality of service and machinery he provided and not his rock bottom price.

 

In those days, revenue was sufficient to allow an operator to send an engineer out with every machine including light machinery. This you rarely if ever see these days but it sure made it a lot easier to do a good job when two men accompanied every machine in the field.

 

Charters were difficult to get unless it came with the purchase of an existing operation. One machine operators were non-existent as were contract pilots. There were some fine operations in those days, Associated, Bow, Kenting and Okanagan to name four. I believe some of these had pension plans for their employees. They kept their pilots and engineers on the payroll year round. There was actually some job security in the business.

 

When aviation was 'deregulated' this state of affairs went by the boards, and it is arguable that we have more regulation now than we had then.

 

It has been previously suggested that Transport Canada reinstate approved tariffs. This would likely cost less money and improve safety to a much greater extent than SMS ever will.

 

 

Spot on. 100% Spot on.

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There was a time when commercial helicopter operators were required to submit their tariffs to the Ministry of Transport for approval. If in the opinion of the Ministry the rate was insufficient to sustain a safe and viable operation, the request was denied. The result was that rates were pretty much the same from operator to operator and customers based their choice of operator on the quality of service and machinery he provided and not his rock bottom price.

 

 

"The CTC treated helicopter operators, with little difference from scheduled fixed wing operators, henceforth the required posted tariffs....there were long term rates and short term rates. Public knowledge."

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In those days, revenue was sufficient to allow an operator to send an engineer out with every machine including light machinery. This you rarely if ever see these days but it sure made it a lot easier to do a good job when two men accompanied every machine in the field.

 

 

"Gee, those were my prime flying days with some of the above mentioned operators, do not remember to many engineers on board with me".

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Charters were difficult to get unless it came with the purchase of an existing operation. One machine operators were non-existent as were contract pilots. There were some fine operations in those days, Associated, Bow, Kenting and Okanagan to name four. I believe some of these had pension plans for their employees. They kept their pilots and engineers on the payroll year round. There was actually some job security in the business.

 

 

" Interesting to note.......all except Okanagan (CHC) went out of business" ??!!

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When aviation was 'deregulated' this state of affairs went by the boards, and it is arguable that we have more regulation now than we had then.

 

 

"Apply for an O.C lately Fred.....please feel free to do so, and find out first hand how "unregulated" it is".

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It has been previously suggested that Transport Canada reinstate approved tariffs. This would likely cost less money and improve safety to a much greater extent than SMS ever will.

 

 

"Tarrifs back then.....posted as long or short term, were blatantly ignored by all operators.....side deals for certain customers were a reality. When long term contracts were bid, it was the other operators that intervened or challenged those bids, and certainly undercut when they wanted the work."

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I believe Bow was bought out and know that Associated was bought out by Okanagan,,,Kenting was owned by drilling company and did go by the wayside,,,I worked at Associated and they were a fine outfit and there were many many people who were there some time,,,there was job security.

 

But as far as contracts go it was not much different then as now as a company could bid very low to get work,,,,was working at Buffalo Airways when Okie under bid substantially to win the IPL pipeline work out of Ft Simpson,,,,it sucked,,,but was competition.

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Yeah, gotta agree with you on Associated being a great company....I was on loan from Okie (agent orange) for polar shelf contract work, because Okie was washing out so many capable pilots with the physcological profile crap......Associated was a good group!

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