Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 60
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Phil, rather than simply not mentioning any 'special' techniques, this might be a good place to let the fledglings know that, while they may hear or read of many 'wondrous' methodologies, they would be well advised to avoid trying any of them without discussing same with their Training PIlot, Chief Pilot, Ops Manager or other such luminaries who can give them the appropriate kind of guidance.

 

Terry

Link to post
Share on other sites
Phil, rather than simply not mentioning any 'special' techniques, this might be a good place to let the fledglings know that, while they may hear or read of many 'wondrous' methodologies, they would be well advised to avoid trying any of them without discussing same with their Training PIlot, Chief Pilot, Ops Manager or other such luminaries who can give them the appropriate kind of guidance.

 

Terry

 

Now thats the "best advice", I've seen in a while...... ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Realistically, the only things that can be learned about confined area work from a book would be things like safety factors, decision making, and rough outlines of different recon's and checks to perform.

 

Any type of technique's that should or shouldn't be used would have to be covered and taught in the helicopter itself. So many of the little things people do while handling their aircraft have to be shown in person and can't really be described 100% effectively in my opinion. Too many factors are involved including; type of aircraft, terrain, wind, etc. As this thread shows, there is just too much chance of someone misinterpreting what is being explained unless you are actually showing it to them in a real situation.

 

That's just my opinion.

 

p.s. For the life of me, I still can't figure out what that Iranian pilot was trying to do in that video... Is that really a technique that is taught to people to pull full power and jam full right pedal to corksscrew up? Because that's what it looks like he does. :o

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

QUOTE (Jet B @ Dec 14 2009, 02:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
p.s. For the life of me, I still can't figure out what that Iranian pilot was trying to do in that video... Is that really a technique that is taught to people to pull full power and jam full right pedal to corksscrew up? Because that's what it looks like he does. :o

 

 

 

Show Off perhaps?

 

 

JD

Link to post
Share on other sites

QUOTE (Jet B @ Dec 14 2009, 02:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Is that really a technique that is taught to people to pull full power and jam full right pedal to corksscrew up? Because that's what it looks like he does. :o

 

 

Did you read the "Safety" Article written by Ken Armstrong? He says,

 

"Another high-risk technique for lifting loads that are too heavy due to hot/high considerations (not over gross – that would be illegal) is the spinning takeoff. In this technique, the pilot applies full power to get the load light and then removes the anti-torque, (tail rotor) input allowing the torque to spin the helicopter around its vertical axis. Unloading the tail rotor provides approximately 10- 16% more torque for vertical lifting. Once the load is 20-30 feet off the ground, the pilot tilts the rotor disk to accelerate through translational lift and then applies anti-torque pedal input to return to balanced flight. However, this is another technique that is frowned on for safety reasons and it can be hard on equipment.... "

 

That's from the April May June 2004 Helicopters Magazine. There's another gem of a paragraph that goes on to explain sling shotting with a long line.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...