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skidkicker

M1/m2

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Anyone out there have your M1 and M2? I was wondering in what ways has it helped you with your past or current employment. Has anyone used the E or S license privilege that comes attached with having both licenses?

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Having both ratings has not affected my 'daily duties' . Though, I've tended to be the 'odd one out' by actually being interested in taking on electrical snags. Snags have some engineers run screaming in the other direction; or put-off troubleshooting while it still mostly works (as a kind-of 'mostly working isn't broken, so don't touch it' rule...that usually means it will break when the piece is needed most).

 

I've ventured more into the E side than the S side.

 

Being most familiar with Bell, there is a lot of work that can be accomplished under the ESPM and the SPM and even the MM that won't go into E-classed areas - as long as I am careful and don't break in to any of the systems that require specialized test equipment the company doesn't have.

 

That's #1 out of two main issues with dabbling in E and S areas under dual ratings: 1) specialized test equipment and 2) what kind of responsibility the company is willing to accept with/under the AME's ACA and signature.

 

The TC inspector that I talked to said what a dual-rated AME can sign for really depends on what is written on the AMO certificate of the company. Example used for me was: Installation of an autopilot system.

 

I could remove an old system, run the wires for the new, put the connectors on the wires, and make any modifications necessary from a structures point of view for the installation and even turn on and troubleshoot the system. What I can't do is hook up the pitot-static test box and certify the system. Firstly, most companies won't keep a fully certified pitot-static test box in their inventory so the company would have to get one (which isn't out of the ordinary). Secondly, I would have to be able to substantiate solidly enough (ultimately, to satisfy the jury in a terrible court case) that I know what I'm doing when I use the equipment and that I have enough experience to use the equipment. That could be done through a training program, much like how pilots undergo training for AD sign-outs or elementary maintenance.

 

Problem one, being the time invested to get the training for company who has the engineer to learn the equipment and the company with the trainer (which would have to be able to substantiate THEIR experience if the court case was big enough). Problem Two - time=money. An avionics shop could complete the task in much less time because of how often they perform the task.

 

Recently; it was explained to me that with one engineer holding dual rating and proper training, specialized repairs in composite and/or sheetmetal could be added to the scope of maintenance within the AMO. Industry approved courses in composites would provide the training, then the AME could either perform the work or individual jobs could be sub-contracted to sheet metal companies who could provide the more experienced people/advanced apprentices to do the work with the AME signing for their work.

 

I have installed auto-re-light systems, replaced faulty canon plugs and re-run lots of wiring within harnesses. Electrical can eat up days if I'm in the nose/floor/engine/transmission of a Bell re-routing, re-tying and cleaning up messy splices, burnt wires, broken solder joints, etc etc etc. Same with any little sheetmetal jobs I've dabbled with - I don't know the tricks and tips that make a job move smoothly; get me into every area the rivet gun needs to fit and don't carry the practice to be fast at troubleshooting or making the piece right the first time. I'm just insanely thorough.

 

I abhor crimp splices. I carry enviro-splices, solder sleeves, wax lacing, solder paste, the correct style of crimpers for canon plugs pins AND PIDG terminals in my tool kits...complete with tool calibration papers just like I do for the torque wrenches I use. I provide copies to the company so that they know my tools are properly certified, just like any avionics shop.

 

The biggest constraint: TIME.

 

Sometimes it just makes more sense to hire the professionals and keep me on the wrenches.

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just fill out your hours and get both, who cares if you ever use it. you can never be overqualified as a wrench. by the way i use the privilages all the time. scott

 

Anyone out there have your M1 and M2? I was wondering in what ways has it helped you with your past or current employment. Has anyone used the E or S license privilege that comes attached with having both licenses?

 

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Get em both! Depending on where you live it opens up more job opportunities. But remember to do the work you should be able to back up what your doing with experience. If you work in a shop with avionics and/or structures get some experience with these guys and get the signatures in your log book regardless if you are already licensed.

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Thanks Val, that was an awesome post. I have my M1/M2 but I wanted to see if anyone in the west was actually getting to use it in the shop and I wanted to see if it was an asset or a pain having people know you could do S and E work. I particularly enjoy E and S work, mostly because I am good at it. Where I used to work, everyone was scared to attempt any large repairs or they were not allowed to touch a 3x gun.

Anyway, thanks for the posts.

 

 

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I particularly enjoy E and S work, mostly because I am good at it.

 

Rivetting was a traumatically frustrating, devastating challenge in college...though I've reasonably mastered it since, it still gives me the queezies. I really resent shoddy work-especially when its my own!

 

Glad the post was positively received..I always fear that some comment about being long winded will come up instead; but I hope that the long stints where I'm not around balance it all out somehow.

 

:D

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Anyone out there have your M1 and M2? I was wondering in what ways has it helped you with your past or current employment. Has anyone used the E or S license privilege that comes attached with having both licenses?

 

I recently discovered getting M2 rating takes much more than just a medium endorsement. You must get your ATA's signed out in your log book, just like M1 and apply to transport to have it added to your liscence. Its odd. I can sign out the 100hr inspection on a 212 but I have to have another AME sign my log book that I am capable of carrying out the task??

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I know a guy who went to TC for the M2 to be added to his license. They told him he had to fill out the tasks in his Logbook for the applicable aircraft. This A/C in particullar was the 205 he had ACA and had been signing out the A/C for months. So he bought a logbook filled it out signed all the tasks off himself and handed is to TC and they gave him the M2. No questions asked.

 

What a joke I was going to do the same thing but I figured what the **** I'm already signing out the 205 why bother.

 

He's on this website off and on maybe he can tell us the story himself.

 

 

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Note that the definitions of each has been changed in the CARS as of the end of last year.

 

566.03 Issuance and Endorsement of an AME Licence

 

8) Ratings.

 

(a) The scope of maintenance release privileges is indicated by rating designators entered on the licence, as follows:

(amended 2009/12/01; previous version)

 

(i) M1: Non‑turbojet aircraft approved to Chapter CAR 522, 523, 523-VLA, 527, and 549 of the Airworthiness Manual and equivalent standards (includes all airframe, engines, propellers, components, structures, and systems of those aircraft), and the aircraft listed in paragraph 566.03(8)(B);

(amended 2009/12/01; previous version)

 

(ii) M2: All aircraft not included in M1 (excluding balloons) (includes all airframes, engines, propellers, components, structures, and systems of those aircraft), and the aircraft listed in paragraph 566.03(8)(B).

(amended 2003/09/01; previous version).

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