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WTF_was_that

Don't Try This At Home Kids

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OT what you said is right, but don't get to fast on the horse here, the only "hyper critical, rite something too long" person here his probably Mr L3.

I'm not against "Really big ballS" maneuvers like this, the only things i can say is that i'm not quit ready to do that.

That kinda of ops to me are fairly close to the edge of that small little envelope we got to work with, only experience pilot should go there, but it still amazingly close in that vid! don't you think?

 

All I got from that is you're into guys.

 

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Over-Talk said:

Since I learned to fly, the MOT has required several hours of instrument training to be included in the student pilot syllabus. I feel this leads to a false sense of security that can lead to horrible results if young pilots try to use those skills as a 'recovery' technique.

 

I have several times taken my students, who sometimes seem to think that because of the 10 hours of "IFR" training in their license, they can flu actual IFR, out into hazy weather, and find the no horizon (edge of water).

 

to see how quickly, when the references out of the corner of their eye, they actually start lose control. Not long!

 

I hold an IFR and STILL find it doubtful, unless in a completely equipped aircraft (WITH autopilot ON), that there would be a happy outcome if inadvertant into the 'muck'.

 

Read 187 seconds, one of the "take five's" that used to come with the safety letter, then divide that in half, or even less, and apply to helicopters.

 

Cheers

H.

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Over-Talk said:

 

I have several times taken my students, who sometimes seem to think that because of the 10 hours of "IFR" training in their license, they can flu actual IFR, out into hazy weather, and find the no horizon (edge of water).

 

to see how quickly, when the references out of the corner of their eye, they actually start lose control. Not long!

 

I hold an IFR and STILL find it doubtful, unless in a completely equipped aircraft (WITH autopilot ON), that there would be a happy outcome if inadvertant into the 'muck'.

 

Read 187 seconds, one of the "take five's" that used to come with the safety letter, then divide that in half, or even less, and apply to helicopters.

 

Cheers

H.

 

Myself, I think Winnie said it all in his above statements. Go IFR with autopilot or VFR in a non reliable instrument equipped aircraft.

 

A little trick I used to use when I started to think I could fly on instruments in a non IFR a/c was pick the largest lake in the area I was flying in the winter, on an overcast day, and try to fly out to the middle of it, to a drill shack, using rate of climb/decent, altimeter, airspeed, and horizon if lucky enough to have one.

Once I left the shoreline and lost the references out of the corner of my eyes, it was like I was not moving, scary. I would then pull back gently on the cyclic, gently make a left turn until I came insight of the shoreline and say again, when the****are you going to learn.

The same thing will happen on glassy water.

 

Oh, and by the way there was nothing wrong with the procedure used in the posting that started this whole conflag. He knew exactly where he was going, shades of NL.

 

Cheers, Don

 

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Myself, I think Winnie said it all in his above statements. Go IFR with autopilot or VFR in a non reliable instrument equipped aircraft.

 

A little trick I used to use when I started to think I could fly on instruments in a non IFR a/c was pick the largest lake in the area I was flying in the winter, on an overcast day, and try to fly out to the middle of it, to a drill shack, using rate of climb/decent, altimeter, airspeed, and horizon if lucky enough to have one.

Once I left the shoreline and lost the references out of the corner of my eyes, it was like I was not moving, scary. I would then pull back gently on the cyclic, gently make a left turn until I came insight of the shoreline and say again, when the****are you going to learn.

The same thing will happen on glassy water.

 

Oh, and by the way there was nothing wrong with the procedure used in the posting that started this whole conflag. He knew exactly where he was going, shades of NL.

 

Cheers, Don

 

Well said, Don. <golf clap>

 

Listen to the voice of experience, kids. If your spider sense is telling you not to do it, don't do it. Go land somewhere else, like the nice blue sky landing spots above. Hang out for a while, tell those stories about how great a helicopter pilot you are... or worse come to worst you get rescued, better than scraping up remains and helicopter parts.

 

Also... the video looked very unscary. The VFR pilot maintained a visual reference in known terrain the whole time (for maybe 6 seconds of "scary"?). He followed a river to the RUNWAY... Looked safe to me.

 

Lesson here is that people in the back seat have cameras, too. eek!

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