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Night Engine Failure

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Years ago our FAMOUS TCCA was going to make TWIN ENGINES required for all helicopters flying over metro area's on a regular basis. Just like everything else they try and do.

 

I can remember telling a company years ago when the seal hunt was on (70's) that I would not fly in that area unless I had a machine that could fly on one engine when the other one failed. so it never happened. Try flying a 212 at gross, it will bring you to the scene of the accident.

 

SMS here we come.

 

It's basically like everything else as in the aviation industry, wait till something happens.

 

Then by God we'll fix.

 

PS: The PIC made the decision and it is nobodies business, but his. So live with it, any incident/accident you walk away from is GOOD.

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I think they did a fine job!! You have to remember that these guys fly every night year round, there is no doubt, being the professional pilots they are, they have thought many times night after night doing ciruits after circuit around the city,

 

"where will I go if the engine sh*ts the bed?????"

 

They are the most experienced fly-around-a-city-at-night crews you will find, and WE can learn a lot from them, no need to be-little a crew that made it safley to the ground by following procedures!!

 

I did a ride along with Edmonton police one time...one of the coolest thigs I have done, and with very proffesional people as well.....GOOD JOB!!! :up:

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props to the drivers.

 

Night autos were some of the most most nerve racking training I've ever done. hard to imagine until you've done it, but once you flair and the light goes up, you're blind. whoopy!

 

parking lots, roads, highways, etc... next time some of you are in these areas, look around, they are COVERED with wires. an engine failure at night is a wonderful little nightmare.

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Years ago our FAMOUS TCCA was going to make TWIN ENGINES required for all helicopters flying over metro area's on a regular basis. Just like everything else they try and do.

 

I can remember telling a company years ago when the seal hunt was on (70's) that I would not fly in that area unless I had a machine that could fly on one engine when the other one failed. so it never happened. Try flying a 212 at gross, it will bring you to the scene of the accident.

 

SMS here we come.

 

It's basically like everything else as in the aviation industry, wait till something happens.

 

Then by God we'll fix.

 

PS: The PIC made the decision and it is nobodies business, but his. So live with it, any incident/accident you walk away from is GOOD.

 

Actually, a 212 at gross flies pretty well on one engine - even with straight 3's.

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Ummm.....I hope your talking about......sea level on no less than a standard day, with a descent of around 500'/min., into wind, onto a runway or a flat wide open field, hopefully with a jettisonable load, anticipating to pull the sh*t outta the torque limits, praying the N1 will not top out.

Perhaps all the 212's I flew, of which (alot) were 3B's.....must have been dogs!

Remember......you did say, "gross weight"!

I must have missed something on the performance charts, and in the real world of the engine failures (4) I have had !!!

 

Please explain what your definition of "flies pretty well on one engine" is?

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By the way.....I reread my post.....it did seem a bit abrupt, was not trying to be critical.....just start a dialoge with other pilots experience, going OEI. :)

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Ummm.....I hope your talking about......sea level on no less than a standard day, with a descent of around 500'/min., into wind, onto a runway or a flat wide open field, hopefully with a jettisonable load, anticipating to pull the sh*t outta the torque limits, praying the N1 will not top out.

Perhaps all the 212's I flew, of which (alot) were 3B's.....must have been dogs!

Remember......you did say, "gross weight"!

I must have missed something on the performance charts, and in the real world of the engine failures (4) I have had !!!

 

Please explain what your definition of "flies pretty well on one engine" is?

 

After years of flying many different types of multi-engine helicopters in both VFR & IFR environments I really should know better than to get into these discussions ... however, having taught this puppy for many years, I feel the need to defend her honour.

 

Read page 4-71 (PT6-3) of the TC approved Bell manual:

 

11,200 lbs, 30 minute power she will maintain 3000' at +20C.

 

Read page 4-66 (PT-3B) of the TC approved Bell manual:

 

11,200 lbs, 30 minute power at 3000' and +20C she will climb at about 50' per minute.

 

And with all due respect, having flown this fine lady from India to the North Pole, ... and having had quite a few more engine failures than you, I stand up for her fine flying abilities.

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By the way.....I reread my post.....it did seem a bit abrupt, was not trying to be critical.....just start a dialoge with other pilots experience, going OEI. :)

 

You just keep on talkin' .... son.

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