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KnuckleDragger

Another Apprentice Grant- Another Screwed Apprentice

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Well- Tax time, again, and explanation, again, that I don't qualify for any grants because my apprenticeship isn't red seal and isn't listed on service canada's list of approved trades. I think since our trade as engineers enables us the license to work anywhere a red seal journeyman can should include us in these grants, but it does not. Anybody know why?

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Well- Tax time, again, and explanation, again, that I don't qualify for any grants because my apprenticeship isn't red seal and isn't listed on service canada's list of approved trades. I think since our trade as engineers enables us the license to work anywhere a red seal journeyman can should include us in these grants, but it does not. Anybody know why?

 

No effing clue. Drove me up the wall this time last year. My accountant agreed because AME is "under review" by the Industry Training Authority (ITA) and we claimed the applicable apprentiship grant and I got the cash. I didn't go back and claim for my first years of apprentiship grants mostly out of fear.

 

I will be claiming the apprentiship completion grant this year as well. F U C K that noise. I want my money. If they only knew how much that money means to a starving (and I mean starving) AME apprentice.

 

Keeping my fingers crossed that the audit man stays away though.

 

Claim tools, and the apprentiship grant and just duck and cover. Thats what I did and will do again this year.

 

Very frusterating isn't it?

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Well guys, here it is...

Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (AME) is not a trade. The AME License is the authority issued by Transport Canada to certify a maintenance release. That's it...no trade...not a mechanic...no tax write offs for tools.

 

Having and AME License is not an indicator of whether you are a good technician, mechanic, or whatever other name you want to put with it. In the Helicopter world, as AME's we are expected to be great technicians, which most of us likely are. To be gainfully employed, we must have an AME License so the work may be inspected and certified, regardless of who actually carries out the work. It just so happens that we usually are the ones doing the work (maintenance) as well.

 

There is no "apprentice AME", merely an AME in Training, if you will.

 

The closest thing to trade certificiation is via CAMC, and I'm not sure where that stands as far as apprenticeship standards goes.

 

The only way I know of to get any tax relief or other financial benefit? is to incorporate as a company, work as a contractor, and keep your books straight too. No company benefits unless you provide them via your company, and no boss telling you what to do & when to do it. ;)

 

Hope this helps with your understanding.

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Well guys, here it is...

Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (AME) is not a trade. The AME License is the authority issued by Transport Canada to certify a maintenance release. That's it...no trade...not a mechanic...no tax write offs for tools.

 

Having and AME License is not an indicator of whether you are a good technician, mechanic, or whatever other name you want to put with it. In the Helicopter world, as AME's we are expected to be great technicians, which most of us likely are. To be gainfully employed, we must have an AME License so the work may be inspected and certified, regardless of who actually carries out the work. It just so happens that we usually are the ones doing the work (maintenance) as well.

 

There is no "apprentice AME", merely an AME in Training, if you will.

 

The closest thing to trade certificiation is via CAMC, and I'm not sure where that stands as far as apprenticeship standards goes.

 

The only way I know of to get any tax relief or other financial benefit? is to incorporate as a company, work as a contractor, and keep your books straight too. No company benefits unless you provide them via your company, and no boss telling you what to do & when to do it. ;)

 

Hope this helps with your understanding.

Also next time your at Canadian Tire check the certificate for the mechanics on the wall. About half of them wont have a red seal. Can not remember the score you must have on the trade exams but you only got the red seal if you were above a certain score. That also used to give you the qualification in any province in Canada and if you did not have the red seal then you used to have to write the provincial exams

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Been through this before folks:

 

http://www.verticalmag.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=12020

 

In BC I have done the provincial grants for four years now that I am licensed.

 

Last ones worth $2500!

 

As for the tool credit this is right off CRA's website.

 

Employed apprentice mechanics

 

You may also be able to deduct a part of the cost of eligible tools you bought in 2009 to earn employment income as an eligible apprentice mechanic.

 

You are an eligible apprentice mechanic if you:

 

* are registered in a program established under the laws of Canada (Transport Canada, Logbook) or of a province or territory that leads to a designation under those laws as a mechanic licensed to repair self-propelled motorized vehicles (such as automobiles, aircraft, boats, or snowmobiles); and

* are employed as an apprentice mechanic.

 

As an eligible apprentice mechanic, you must first calculate the tradesperson's tools deduction, if any, that you qualify for. You may qualify for this deduction if you bought eligible tools for your job in 2009. You can then complete the calculation described in the section called “Deduction for tools for an eligible apprentice mechanic” to determine if you can also make this claim in 2009.

 

An eligible tool is a tool (including associated equipment such as a toolbox) that:

 

* you bought to use in your job as an apprentice mechanic and was not used for any purpose before you bought it;

* your employer certified as being necessary for you to provide as a condition of, and for use in, your job as an apprentice mechanic; and

* is not an electronic communication device (like a cell phone) or electronic data processing equipment (unless the device or equipment can be used only for the purpose of measuring, locating or calculating).

 

Your employer has to complete and sign Form T2200, Declaration of Conditions of Employment. Have your employer complete question 12 of Part B of the form to certify that you bought and provided the tools being claimed as a condition of your employment as an eligible apprentice mechanic. Attach to Form T2200 a list of the tools you are claiming, as well as the related receipts. You do not have to submit Form T2200 or your list of tools or receipts with your return, but keep them in case we ask to see them.

 

 

 

 

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This one is for all AMEs Licensed or not:

 

 

Deduction for tools

 

If you were a tradesperson in 2009, use the following formula to calculate your maximum tradesperson's tools deduction for the cost of eligible tools you bought in 2009:

 

Maximum deduction for eligible tools is the lesser of:

 

a) $500; and

 

B) the amount, if any, determined by the formula

 

A - $1,044

 

where

 

A = the lesser of:

 

1. the total cost of eligible tools that you bought in 2009; and

 

2. your income from employment as a tradesperson for the year

 

plus the amount you received in 2009 under the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant program and, under proposed changes, the Apprenticeship Completion Grant.;

 

minus the amount of any Apprenticeship Incentive Grant and, under proposed changes, Apprenticeship Completion Grant overpayments that you had to repay in 2009.

 

Enter your claim on the “Tradesperson's tools expenses” line of Form T777, Statement of Employment Expenses.

 

 

Example:

 

 

Example

In 2009, Karsten is employed as an electrician with ABC Company, and he needs to purchase additional tools for his job. He paid $2,500 for the tools he needed, and he earned $45,000 in employment income in 2009 as an electrician.

 

He calculates his maximum deduction for eligible tools in 2009 as follows:

 

Maximum deduction for eligible tools is the lesser of:

 

a) $500; and

 

B) the amount, if any, determined by the formula

 

A - $1,044

 

where

 

A = the lesser of:

 

1. $2,500; and

2. $45,000

 

Karsten's maximum deduction for 2009 is the lesser of $500 and $1,456 ($2,500 - $1,044). Karsten claims a deduction of $500 on line 229 of his 2009 tax return.

 

 

CRA Link: http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/E/pub/tg/t4044/t4...html#P452_39395

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As a quick heads up, there is going to be a significant change to the AME apprenticeship and it will be driven by the ITA. look for something that reflects more of a 1, 2, 3, 4 year apprentice forumla.

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Been through this before folks:

 

http://www.verticalmag.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=12020

 

In BC I have done the provincial grants for four years now that I am licensed.

 

Last ones worth $2500!

 

As for the tool credit this is right off CRA's website.

 

Employed apprentice mechanics

 

You may also be able to deduct a part of the cost of eligible tools you bought in 2009 to earn employment income as an eligible apprentice mechanic.

 

You are an eligible apprentice mechanic if you:

 

* are registered in a program established under the laws of Canada (Transport Canada, Logbook) or of a province or territory that leads to a designation under those laws as a mechanic licensed to repair self-propelled motorized vehicles (such as automobiles, aircraft, boats, or snowmobiles); and

* are employed as an apprentice mechanic.

 

As an eligible apprentice mechanic, you must first calculate the tradesperson's tools deduction, if any, that you qualify for. You may qualify for this deduction if you bought eligible tools for your job in 2009. You can then complete the calculation described in the section called “Deduction for tools for an eligible apprentice mechanic” to determine if you can also make this claim in 2009.

 

An eligible tool is a tool (including associated equipment such as a toolbox) that:

 

* you bought to use in your job as an apprentice mechanic and was not used for any purpose before you bought it;

* your employer certified as being necessary for you to provide as a condition of, and for use in, your job as an apprentice mechanic; and

* is not an electronic communication device (like a cell phone) or electronic data processing equipment (unless the device or equipment can be used only for the purpose of measuring, locating or calculating).

 

Your employer has to complete and sign Form T2200, Declaration of Conditions of Employment. Have your employer complete question 12 of Part B of the form to certify that you bought and provided the tools being claimed as a condition of your employment as an eligible apprentice mechanic. Attach to Form T2200 a list of the tools you are claiming, as well as the related receipts. You do not have to submit Form T2200 or your list of tools or receipts with your return, but keep them in case we ask to see them.

 

From Revenue Canada:

Apprenticeship Incentive Grant (AIG)

 

The Apprenticeship Incentive Grant (AIG) is a taxable cash grant of $1,000 per year, up to a maximum of $2,000 per person, available to registered apprentices once they have successfully completed their first or second year/level (or equivalent) of an apprenticeship program in one of the Red Seal trades.

 

Apprentices should be aware that there is a deadline to apply.

 

Apprenticeship Completion Grant (ACG)

 

The Apprenticeship Completion Grant (ACG) is a $2,000 taxable cash grant designed to encourage apprentices registered in a designated Red Seal trade to complete their apprenticeship program and receive their certification. Eligibility is retroactive to January 1, 2009.

 

The completion grant will be offered to apprentices who complete their training, become certified journeymen/journeywomen in a designated Red Seal trade and who obtain either the Red Seal endorsement or a provincial or territorial Certificate of Qualification.

 

Bottom line according to the tax folks, to my understanding: Our trade is not designated red seal, therefore we are not eligible

 

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As a quick heads up, there is going to be a significant change to the AME apprenticeship and it will be driven by the ITA. look for something that reflects more of a 1, 2, 3, 4 year apprentice forumla.

 

Thanks 212! That's really good to hear. Last year they gave me the "ya tough luck" kinda thing. I am glad they realize the predicament we are in and are on it.

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