Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Meh....I have a smattering of knowledge of the CARS in general. And I really don't have a strong opinion one way or another. But to me, unless someone's hair is on fire, closing the (hinged) doors of your aircraft is kinda "page 1" stuff.....

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 66
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

But to me, unless someone's hair is on fire, closing the (hinged) doors of your aircraft is kinda "page 1" stuff.....

 

 

:D Too Funny !

 

 

Heliian, You say If there is no intent to be negligent then you're fine. How's it like to live in a world with the Easter Bunny and the Tooth Fairy ?

 

Good Luck with your career ! :blink:

Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 Deuce

 

3Bx2 sounds like santa brought you a lump of coal for Xmas. Yes, intent is just half of it and you will not always be "fine" but I keep my practices above board, so why the heyll should I worry about getting sued by everyone for anything at anytime? I enjoy leaving my house in the morning and doing what I love to do and there isn't anyone who can stop me. Except my wife, wink wink, nudge nudge. :)

 

Luck has nothing to do with it!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Heliian, I'm guessing you have zero experience in the area that this rescue took place. The local pilots and sar groups have much more sar experience than the military in that region...

 

These companies with Jetrangers/Longrangers/407s who have "much more sar experience than the military in that region," would they also happen to include PCP/ACP-qualified search and rescue technicians with them as well? Seems like some folks think the RCMP were stretching things...yet that things weren't as severe as to require National SAR resources...just somewhere in the middle...convenient.

 

For those who are quick to write off things as 'EMERGENCY OVER' back in the valley, thus implying an admin move, perhaps you missed the actual words of the ground SAR spokesman in the video clip...

 

[reporter 1:02-1:08] "...the victim, unresponsive and suffering the effects of hypothermia, was rushed by air ambulance to hospital..."

 

[Mr. Dan Bruneski, Kent Harrison Search and Rescue, 1:10-119] "...with reduced level of consciousness, she was [uhhh] in, in quite a bit of trouble [ummm] so it was imperative, I thought, [uhh] that she get air lifted out as quick as possible..."

 

The Air Services Officer, likely receiving comms from the constables on the ground relaying the SAR director's status of the victim and direction to air evac asap, and acting accordingly -- given ALL the information available to us, yes, I'm thinking they made an appropriate call.

 

Can anyone state what any of the other aircraft response times would have been once called, especially given that the victim was in a reduced level of consciousness and ground SAR pers were calling for an immediate evac?

 

 

Regards

AV8

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

There is always more than one way to skin a cat. You could perform a 200'+ hoist into a Cormorant, you could slide a stretcher in sideways into a hovering EC120 and depart with no attendant administering first aid to the patient and hold onto the stretcher with all your strength or you could land a Jetranger/Longranger/407/A-Star and shut down to load a stretcher and first aid attendant like one of the local guys had done on the EXACT SAME gravel bar (according to a SAR guy). On second thought, you probably wouldn't even have to shut the Longdog/407 down to load...

Maybe its just the calls I've been involved in but I have never flown a critical patient without an attendant able to continuously take a pulse, scoop puke or pump on their chest. I'm no doctor, I'm just saying.

Because really, the patient surviving with the least amount of risk during the transfer is what its all about isn't it?

Link to post
Share on other sites
When in doubt, quote the reporter!

 

...'cause they always get it right.

 

Well, I was doing the whole thing and that got in there too during my paste. I think you know my point. :rolleyes:

 

Why don't we just stick with the Ground SAR spokesman then:

 

[Mr. Dan Bruneski, Kent Harrison Search and Rescue, 1:10-1:19] "...with reduced level of consciousness, she was [uhhh] in, in quite a bit of trouble [ummm] so it was imperative, I thought, [uhh] that she get air lifted out as quick as possible..."

 

Perhaps someone here would also like to question Mr. Bruneski's qualifications to make the call that he did?

 

 

Anybody yet on how many minutes a civilian, stretcher/EMT/PCP-equipped chopper would have been on scene if it had been called out? Five minutes? 10? 15?

 

 

regards

AV8

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...