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When Is It Ok To Be A Cowboy?


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Great topic regret nothing. When it comes to critical human life the answer is often yes there is no piece of paper that can overwrite the gut when comes to critical helicopter support in remote and particular moments of life. However I do have a few rules that I govern myself with, in regards to judgement.

1.Can the job be done safely without harm to people or property

2.Is there a better trained pilot available

3.Is the helicopter suited for the mission

4.Have I been in this situation before and how will I react in a emergency

5.Are my skills sufficient to do the job flying in weather, HETS ,ect

6.Do I know the area is it my back yard...?

7.If I was almost dead, would I come and attempt a rescue

8.Did the ops manager or chief pilot give me the thumb’s up

 

In the words of a past employer “Are you a Helicopter Pilot “or WTF

Just my 2 cents,

 

 

Great topic MMike, Great reply 1Cloud.

 

I think a lot of guys go through some form on Cowboy phase, hopefully without incident, and when there are young. The may be seeking or testing their limits, and tend to back down after some scares, some rational thoughts, some maturity, or some coaching.

 

If they do survive (and thankfully, almost all do) , hopefully they have learned some things...ie what not to do.

 

One question that I put to possible young cowboys...What are you going to tell your Boss, TC, the Lawyers? If you don't have a good explanation, you'd best not do it, or find a good reason....you may need it !

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when is it ok to be a cowboy

 

1. logging, your a hero when your pulling wood in 0/0 viz or at least thats what i heard in the bar

2. logging , your a hero when sling shoting wood off the hill, or at least thats what i heard in the bar

3. Drills, when you move that engine, when nobody else could, or at least that what i heard in the bar

4. Drills, its ok to run with low fuel light on, or at least that what heard in the bar.

4. Seismic, when you take that extra bag, even when your dragging them out of staging, or at least thats what i heard in the bar.

5. Seismic, Drills, logging. naaa thats pads big enough, cause i'm a super star, or at least that what i heard in the bar.

6. Fires, when you kick the bucket way out in front, dunk it, and fly right through with out ever coming to a hover, or at lest thats what heard in the bar.

 

 

Believe nothing of what you Hear, and only half of what you see.

 

 

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when is it ok to be a cowboy

 

1. logging, your a hero when your pulling wood in 0/0 viz or at least thats what i heard in the bar

2. logging , your a hero when sling shoting wood off the hill, or at least thats what i heard in the bar

3. Drills, when you move that engine, when nobody else could, or at least that what i heard in the bar

4. Drills, its ok to run with low fuel light on, or at least that what heard in the bar.

4. Seismic, when you take that extra bag, even when your dragging them out of staging, or at least thats what i heard in the bar.

5. Seismic, Drills, logging. naaa thats pads big enough, cause i'm a super star, or at least that what i heard in the bar.

6. Fires, when you kick the bucket way out in front, dunk it, and fly right through with out ever coming to a hover, or at lest thats what heard in the bar.

 

 

Believe nothing of what you Hear, and only half of what you see.

 

Sounds like you spend a lot of time in bars. The first step is admitting you have a problem.

 

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Is it ok to ignore the CARs to "do the right thing"?

 

I had a close look at my new license (just to make sure I had the latest info) and nowhere could I find where it said: "If, in your own judgment, you consider it necessary to violate any CAR's rule that would prevent you from otherwise preforming the task, we grant you the authority to do so."

 

Maybe I missed it, but I looked pretty close.

 

For you "new pilots", do they teach you that it is OK to act as above, during your training?

 

As I said in a different thread, "Your emergency, isn't necessary my emergency."

 

Hero-itis is the worst thing in the world, because we all think we can do most anything. After all, look at all the hours, experience, ability, talent, etc that I have!

 

It is so easy to become emotionally involved to the point that it clouds our judgment. When you are faced with the "grizzly bear" scenario, ask yourself, "Would I make the same choices about breaking the rules if there was no emergency?"

 

If not, why not. Non emergencies are much less stressful, less demanding (usually) and we "just don't feel the need" as much as we do when we become involved.

 

I've been emotionally involved, pushed crap I never would now, but would like to think I would make better choices now.

 

But we all have to remember that when (if) it goes sideways, it will pretty lonely standing in front of the court by yourself - 'cause ain't gonna be anyone else there with you, no matter how much you think you were "doing the right thing."

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Sorry to get pedantic here, but violating some CARs to save a life or perform a rescue does not make you a "cowboy".

 

I have seen a few "cowboy" or "hot-dog" maneuvers in my days......and yet many of them complied with all the CARs, except maybe the one about reckless flying.......

602.01 No person shall operate an aircraft in such a reckless or negligent manner as to endanger or be likely to endanger the life or property of any person.

 

"Cowboy" maneuvers can usually be identified by simply asking "was that necessary to perform the operation?"............(try watching a few sight-seeing videos on YouTube and you'll see what I mean).

 

It is NEVER OK to be a "cowboy".

 

Rescue flights are a different matter all together.

A professional pilot should have the decision-making skills to decide if he should endanger someone's life in an attempt to lower the danger that (or another) person may be in, without operating in a reckless or negligent manner.

 

Arguably, helicopter pilots put people's lives in danger every time they take-off.

(As does a 747 Captain, or a taxi driver picking-up a passenger).

But that doesn't make them a "cowboy", or violate the CARs.

 

As professional pilots we must attempt to minimize the inherent risk to an acceptable minimum,

and do our job in a manner that cannot be construed as reckless or negligent.

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referring to the event that just happened....(I figured it better to ask this here than in the actual thread...and I mean no disrespect. I'm trying to ask an innocent question).....If in fact it was low viz, and again this is armchair quarter backing.....but should low-timers have been flying in low viz conditions? Would it relate to judgment/wisdom gained through flight hours? Or I guess the fog could have just rolled in with nowhere for them to land....

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