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MMike

When Is It Ok To Be A Cowboy?

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I think it's way too soon, and available information is way too incomplete, to start dissecting the Essential crash. Out of respect to the new pilots who lost their lives, let's put this discussion on the back burner (and be advised that we will moderate accordingly). Our deepest sympathies to the families from everyone at Vertical — and especially from me, because I believe that I met at least one and possibly both of the victims earlier this year. A sad day.

 

I agree that the question of when it is OK to be a cowboy depends on the definition of "cowboy." And I tend to think that "cowboy" = operating an aircraft in a needlessly reckless manner, in which case it's never OK. "Breaking the rules," on the other hand, is something that can conceivably be justified in extreme cases (but then again, according to the FAA hazardous attitudes assessment test, I'm "anti-authority").

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I had a close look at my new license (just to make sure I had the latest info) and nowhere could I find where it said: "If, in your own judgment, you consider it necessary to violate any CAR's rule that would prevent you from otherwise preforming the task, we grant you the authority to do so."

 

Maybe I missed it, but I looked pretty close.

 

For you "new pilots", do they teach you that it is OK to act as above, during your training?

 

As I said in a different thread, "Your emergency, isn't necessary my emergency."

 

Hero-itis is the worst thing in the world, because we all think we can do most anything. After all, look at all the hours, experience, ability, talent, etc that I have!

 

It is so easy to become emotionally involved to the point that it clouds our judgment. When you are faced with the "grizzly bear" scenario, ask yourself, "Would I make the same choices about breaking the rules if there was no emergency?"

 

If not, why not. Non emergencies are much less stressful, less demanding (usually) and we "just don't feel the need" as much as we do when we become involved.

 

I've been emotionally involved, pushed crap I never would now, but would like to think I would make better choices now.

 

But we all have to remember that when (if) it goes sideways, it will pretty lonely standing in front of the court by yourself - 'cause ain't gonna be anyone else there with you, no matter how much you think you were "doing the right thing."

 

I'd rather be judged by 12 than carried by 6. If it was your daughter or son you might find it in yourself to break the rules.

 

And it just so happens that was someones daughter.

 

Glad there was a happy ending.

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I'd rather be judged by 12 than carried by 6. If it was your daughter or son you might find it in yourself to break the rules.

 

And it just so happens that was someones daughter.

 

Glad there was a happy ending.

 

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I'd rather be judged by 12 than carried by 6.

 

So it's OK to take the chance? You (and others) might still end up carried by the 6.

 

I'm glad it had a happy ending as well. I just sometimes worry about the thought processes that go before a decision that

might
lead to an unhappy ending.

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I think it's way too soon, and available information is way too incomplete, to start dissecting the Essential crash. Out of respect to the new pilots who lost their lives, let's put this discussion on the back burner (and be advised that we will moderate accordingly). Our deepest sympathies to the families from everyone at Vertical — and especially from me, because I believe that I met at least one and possibly both of the victims earlier this year. A sad day.

 

I agree that the question of when it is OK to be a cowboy depends on the definition of "cowboy." And I tend to think that "cowboy" = operating an aircraft in a needlessly reckless manner, in which case it's never OK. "Breaking the rules," on the other hand, is something that can conceivably be justified in extreme cases (but then again, according to the FAA hazardous attitudes assessment test, I'm "anti-authority").

 

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Cowboy Flying

 

Cowboy Flying Rule 1. Cowboy flying should only be carried out under parameters which ensure the following headline: "Pilot, Sole Occupant of Helicopter, Dies in Crash"

 

Cowboy Flying Rule 2. Cowboy flying should only be carried out under parameters which ensure the following sub-headline: "Witnesses To Crash Unhurt"

 

Cowboy Flying Rule #3. When your son/daughter/spouse asks why the coffin is L-shaped, the response will be: "They couldn't remove the tranny from his head."

 

Cowboy Flying Rule #4: In the event there is no crash and 7 pallbearers are not required for the funeral, it is likely that the helo may have been overstressed or may have exceeeded a parameter or two. This is what the next pilot will inherit....

 

Breaking Rules

 

In regards to a conscious choice to knowingly and deliberately break rules and regulations, my view on that is as follows:

 

If I'm face-to-face with a MORAL OBLIGATION to evacuate, rescue, search or transport people facing distress, injury, death or imminent danger....I will do everything I possibly could so that I would be able tell that person or their family "I helped today," or if things don't work out like they do in Walt Disney's world..."I'm sorry, but I honestly did everything I could to help him/her/them"

 

My 2 cents.

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P.S. On the subject of "being a cowboy," given the overall context of this topic, I probably should have clarified that I was speaking in general terms. I don't have the expertise to speak authoritatively on many of the incidents that have recently been discussed on this board, but I do think that various posters have raised good points. I don't want to convey the impression that I'm generally in favor of "breaking the rules"! I've never had a need to do so myself, but I can imagine situations in which deviating from the rules — and immediately reporting that deviation as required — would be acceptable.

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Hmmmm....my post seems to have gone astray?

 

The title or phrase "cowboy" is totally unacceptable within the aviation community.

 

That is a "normilization of deviance", that becomes acceptable to a flight crew member, that breaks any rule(s), and gets away with it.

 

It only gets worse from there.

 

"Anti-Authority" Elan ?????

 

Be careful.....you are a representative of this media !!???

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"Anti-Authority" Elan ?????

 

Be careful.....you are a representative of this media !!???

 

Looks like our posts crossed, Helilog. You're right, I made the mistake of posting hastily — hopefully I clarified in my post above.

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