Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
jas600

Pilot Training

Recommended Posts

Most, but not all, of the companies I've spoken with regarding employment attribute their hiring to work ethic, teamwork ability, passion for the job, and salesmenship over endorsements or school choice.

 

I would have to agree with what Cole said, very good advice.

 

There are a lot of schools out there that want your money. So do the research meet the people and look beyond the sales pitch. Also look at schools that have put there students to work. There are a few out there. As for advanced training Sling,Mountain etc. try to incorporate some into your training. Good to have an idea of what is to come but don't spend to much money you got to learn to fly first.

 

I have seen low time pilots show up looking for work with Mountain course, long line, and Water bucket training. The reality is that when you get your first job none of this matters as you will start slow, flying simple jobs. I showed up to my first job with 4 hrs on a Jetranger the guy next to me had 100hrs on a Jetranger. We both did the company training and progressed at the same rate I had to spend a little more time orienting myself with the aircraft but in the end the only difference was the other guy had about $50,000 more debt than I.

 

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As for advanced training Sling,Mountain etc. try to incorporate some into your training. Good to have an idea of what is to come but don't spend to much money you got to learn to fly first.

 

I have seen low time pilots show up looking for work with Mountain course, long line, and Water bucket training. The reality is that when you get your first job none of this matters as you will start slow, flying simple jobs. I showed up to my first job with 4 hrs on a Jetranger the guy next to me had 100hrs on a Jetranger. We both did the company training and progressed at the same rate I had to spend a little more time orienting myself with the aircraft but in the end the only difference was the other guy had about $50,000 more debt than I.

 

Now THIS is sage advice!!

 

Rather than spending monies on things that won't be relevant at your stage, research what a company want out of a new guy, find out how many hours the Chief Pilot wants on certain equipment before he lets you lose. See if there are any other basic skills they want, rather than the advanced stuff you wont do for the first 200 hours.

 

Cheers

H.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many of you guys include a PDM, Human Factors etc in your courses? If you aren't I suggest adding them into the course as it gets the students thinking about this stuff early.

When I was doing the hiring I don't recall seeing any resumes from new pilots with these courses on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many of you guys include a PDM, Human Factors etc in your courses? If you aren't I suggest adding them into the course as it gets the students thinking about this stuff early.

When I was doing the hiring I don't recall seeing any resumes from new pilots with these courses on them.

 

PDM is part of every lesson, and is spelled out as in factors of PDM we will be looking at for the individual exercises.

 

Human Factors is also integral to the ground school, and all schools teach it as well. We have additional CRM training as well, but all the training is geared towards more advanced stuff, and not so much single pilot unfortunately.

 

Cheers

H.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Winnie are the students coming out of the school with certificates for these courses?

 

Further to Chopperman's question - where would one find a good PDM/human factors course that *is* recognised by Canada's helicopter community?

 

I've had training in decision making and human factors as it relates to avalanches and snow safety, and I've found it very valuable over the years (interestingly, the avalanche decision making/human factors course has its roots in an aviation PDM curriculum, but I'm not sure which one).

 

As I'm pretty new to the heli world I'd like to revisit this training from a flying perspective.

 

 

 

Cheers,

 

Darren

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not usually, but it is a thought to provide the students with certificates of thsi training.

 

AS far as HUman Factors training, we offer a course, but it is not "helicopter centric" in as it is based on the Transport Canada course.

 

With regards to the students, the course they take is part of the requirements for ground school, as in they HAVE to take it, but I might be convinced in making a certificate for completing it.

 

Cheers

H.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many of you guys include a PDM, Human Factors etc in your courses? If you aren't I suggest adding them into the course as it gets the students thinking about this stuff early.

When I was doing the hiring I don't recall seeing any resumes from new pilots with these courses on them.

 

 

Interesting point Todd. I have always wondered if the operation of different types of GPS's e.g.(Garmin 296,396,496) and FM radios e.g.( T-138's, Wulfsburg's) should be included in the ab initio training. How many times do guys show up on a fire and don't know the avionics very well, it looks unprofessional. This type of training doesn't cost much to learn and is a huge part of the job.

 

Although longlining, bucketing, etc. is likely not required in the beginning of a pilots career learning the equiptment would be productive. Even how to fill out a forestry report or charter ticket would be useful. learning SOP's for fire suppression such as what the role of a bird dog, IA, Tankers etc. is, maybe the difference between 2D and 3D seismic would be useful as well.

 

Thoughts???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting point Todd. I have always wondered if the operation of different types of GPS's e.g.(Garmin 296,396,496) and FM radios e.g.( T-138's, Wulfsburg's) should be included in the ab initio training. How many times do guys show up on a fire and don't know the avionics very well, it looks unprofessional. This type of training doesn't cost much to learn and is a huge part of the job.

 

Although longlining, bucketing, etc. is likely not required in the beginning of a pilots career learning the equiptment would be productive. Even how to fill out a forestry report or charter ticket would be useful. learning SOP's for fire suppression such as what the role of a bird dog, IA, Tankers etc. is, maybe the difference between 2D and 3D seismic would be useful as well.

 

Thoughts???

 

I agree completely. I have also met EXPERIENCED pilots who did not know HOW to operate basic equipment in the machines, such as the TFM-138 series. Simple stuff like dialing by using remote towers and changing frequencies for the radios that does NOT have 100 stored channels.

 

Also had people unable to figure out HOW to use UTM grid, and finding or converting to lat long. Simple stuff like entering waypoints in the gps.

 

I have long wanted to include this in the training curriculum, but most students only want to go long-lining... (Wonder why). And without a training unit in the classroom, it is difficult.

 

CHeers

H.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a suggestion. Perhaps this web site should establish another topic area as opposed to the less useful ones like "joke of the day" etc. Other web pages I attend on other subjects(Yes, you can actually have a life other than helicopters 24 hours a day)will have a technical area that memnbers will post information-a "How To" area. You can post information on how to perform various tasks for the knowledge and information of interest to others. I've seen other site members post tutorials on vintage vehicle wiring, how to service a transfer case, etc etc. There are some really knowledgable individuals here (Phil Croucher comes to mind) who can pass on some really USEFUL info in a matter of fact basis. Simple things like how to program an FM step by step, Bucketing tips, on and on. There would be no need for the oft rambing on by members posting inane comments etc, just information useful to all. A collective of knowledge, as it were.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...