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Aerial Filming Safety

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This compilation was posted a long time ago, but the link has since expired.

I recently updated it with some better equipment photos.

 

http://tinyurl.com/259x3ly

 

One interesting point they make is the angle of view that a pilot has under normal flying conditions.

When concentrating on film work that angle often decreases by 50%. . .

 

" Pilots often become consumed by the work objective when they are conducting aerial work; operating the helicopter can become secondary. As an example, when a pilot is flying in a narrow valley, his or her effective awareness is about 100 degrees on either side of the nose, however, when trying to keep a nose-mounted camera focused on an object in the valley, the pilot’s effective awareness is concentrated about 45 degrees on either side of the nose. "

 

There's a lot of information in these articles.

I'm posting it again in case it helps anyone out there who is interested in doing better / more film or video work.

 

( Aviation background: my logged hrs unfortunately are not on helos. Pilot licence in 1966 on fixed wing single engine and floats, on gliders, and 300+ jumps as a freefall cameraman, have been filming and flying with you all since 1976. )

 

Thanks guys.

 

Tree gerg10.gif

 

 

 

 

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This is great article in shameless self promoting. Good on the "Film Pilots" for keeping there day rates up. The rest of use could learn, from this. Be shameless in your marketing, and self promotion. Keep rates up and get "residuals".

 

 

Its not just "Film pilots" hitting power lines or glaciers. Maybe a power line pilot should be flying film.

 

How about the super star, really experienced old film pilot, been doing it for 15yrs, who overloaded a twin star and rolled it up in colorado last month. Any one could do that, not just a film pilot.

 

 

The hardest thing about flying a helicopter is knowing what the costumer wants, and never ever forget to fly the aircraft first.

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How about the super star, really experienced old film pilot, been doing it for 15yrs, who overloaded a twin star and rolled it up in colorado last month. Any one could do that, not just a film pilot.

 

Interesting point, that was on Fri Sept 17 at Pikes Peak but there is no record here at NTSB webpage.

 

http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/AccList.asp?month=9&year=2010

 

I thought they listed every US event on those pages, but not this one......... strange ?

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