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Super Puma Tips Over At Boundary Bay


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Today at Boundary Bay a Super Puma during maintenance "tips over with rotors turning". How does that happen?

 

Glad to hear that no one was injured.

 

http://www.vancouversun.com/Super+Puma+helicopter+tips+over+with+rotors+turning+Boundary+Airport/4060095/story.html

 

 

Initial reports are that a main gear collapsed. Nobody hurt thankfully.

 

RH

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Most places I've been didn't allow AMEs without pilot licences to run helicopters, starting with the Canadian military. This certainly isn't a 'first' but maybe it could be a 'last?'

 

I don't want to get a pilot vs. AME argument going, but there's just not enough training for AMEs to be prepared for the variety of possible eventualities.

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Most places I've been didn't allow AMEs without pilot licences to run helicopters, starting with the Canadian military. This certainly isn't a 'first' but maybe it could be a 'last?'

 

I don't want to get a pilot vs. AME argument going, but there's just not enough training for AMEs to be prepared for the variety of possible eventualities.

 

The pilot in command has just logged onto Skype with me. It was not an AME at the controls, it was one of CHC's finest Puma instructors and the best fellow I've ever had the honour to fly with.

 

The TSB is doing their thing.

 

RH

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Most places I've been didn't allow AMEs without pilot licences to run helicopters, starting with the Canadian military. This certainly isn't a 'first' but maybe it could be a 'last?'

 

I don't want to get a pilot vs. AME argument going, but there's just not enough training for AMEs to be prepared for the variety of possible eventualities.

 

Absolutely agree!!!

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Is the Puma not a "two" pilot ship...??????????????

 

Probably not during a maintenance run. But then again......

You raised a good point Bob.

If a ship requires two pilots to operate does that apply to maintence runs?

 

Duing my CPAir days I held a runup and taxi certificate. I always had a second and third Engineer with me on the B727's and DC8's. A second set of eyes out front and someone to operate the flight engineers panel. On the 737's only one extra set of eyes required in the R/H seat. That all changed when we got the 747's. Engineers could run the engines but could not taxi the aircraft. And yes. we ALWAYS used the checklist, even for a short little single engine run. Jes sayin'

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Probably not during a maintenance run. But then again......

You raised a good point Bob.

If a ship requires two pilots to operate does that apply to maintence runs?

 

Duing my CPAir days I held a runup and taxi certificate. I always had a second and third Engineer with me on the B727's and DC8's. A second set of eyes out front and someone to operate the flight engineers panel. On the 737's only one extra set of eyes required in the R/H seat. That all changed when we got the 747's. Engineers could run the engines but could not taxi the aircraft. And yes. we ALWAYS used the checklist, even for a short little single engine run. Jes sayin'

 

The Super Puma is a single pilot (in VFR) machine. Except, of course, when dictated by IFR requirements and customer requirements. Just as a quick point, the French military has lost more 332 variants on the ground than they ever did in flight due to it's very short coupled gear. Cats just love to roll on their back don't they? ;-)

 

I'm curious though, how many pilots in the S64 for a ground run? We only needed one for the 61N and 61L.

 

It is funny though with perspective. Pilots are more than happy to have the AME do the runs at 2:30am as often happened at Helijet and Cougar in CYYT.

 

RH

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It is funny though with perspective. Pilots are more than happy to have the AME do the runs at 2:30am as often happened at Helijet and Cougar in CYYT.

 

RH

 

Are they allowed to engage the rotors? If so, they WILL get bitten one evening. Minor shyte like ground resonance and the infamous Sikorsky shuffle.

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Are they allowed to engage the rotors? If so, they WILL get bitten one evening. Minor shyte like ground resonance and the infamous Sikorsky shuffle.

 

The fine fellows that are authorized at Cougar go through an intense training regime at Flight Safety International in the Level D simulator. There is very little that they don't know how to respond to after that. Being used to the night shift, they will very likely be safer at the controls than some poor sap of a driver that got a phone call at 23:30 to come in for 0100 when he thought he had the next day off duty.

 

Been there and have the T-shirt.

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