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Daily Inspection Sign Outs


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Hey guys

At our company here we used to sign out DI's for the A star and the 206 which we have never done at other companies.

We were then told by transport auditors that this was not required.

 

Can someone direct me to the cars language that directs how this is done? (We have to do a DI signout on the heavies)

Thanks!

B

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From what I've heard, A D.I. has to be signed out whereas a preflight check does not. If your ops manual says you have to sign it out, then you do, if it doesn't say anything then you don't have to but a little CYA never hurt. As for a CAR's reference, any inspections would be found in the maintenance schedule for that a/c including daily, 25hr, 50hr, etc.. If you wanted to be real uptight about it, you would also be req'd to sgin out turnaround checks and after last flight checks. Some manufacturers actually have daily inspection forms to fill in too.

 

a PFC is not a DI but a DI is a PFC?

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not too familiar with astars but ime pretty sure there is no DI on a 206. Pilots usually cant sign out inspections. there is exceptions to that for special insp. that the pilot has been specifically trained for. some types have AD's that require this. pretty sure as per the manufatures insp. program on a 206 you can go for 100 hrs without an inspection. The flight manual does give the requirements for a pre flight check. allways wondered why DI's got sighned out on machines that don't have a DI requirement.

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allways wondered why DI's got sighned out on machines that don't have a DI requirement.

 

Some companies require an entry in their MPM manual.

Your company MPM can add to a manufacturer's requirement, but not subtract.

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Some companies require an entry in their MPM manual.

Your company MPM can add to a manufacturer's requirement, but not subtract.

so then you send your pilot out with a 206 and no engineer do you have to train the pilot to sign out the insp.? would you not have to have insp. sheets and all the same paperwork as any other insp.? the flight manual already has a pre flight that pretty much has all a pilot could do for a DI anyway

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Me thinks you guys are letting rules and regulations replace good old common sense and standard aviation practice.

 

Always do a DI on a machine either the evening before or the morning of a flight. Should be done by an Engineer or a Pilot trained on type. This includes removal of covers such as T/R drive shaft covers etc. It doesn't matter what the friggen "book" says, it's just common sense to have a good indepth look at the machine once a flying day that will save your arse some day.

 

A preflight is done by the Pilot just prior to the first takeoff of the day and entails opening latched panels and having a look inside with a good flashlight. I am constantly amazed by the number of Pilots that do not do a preflight. They just ask the Engineer--Good to go? and jump in. Absolute idiocy!! Once again, just common sense that will save your sorry arse one day. No Engineer is bulletproof. He/She can miss things very easily.

 

Now something that nobody has mentioned. "The walkaround" The walkaround is always done immediatly prior to every flight and is always done by the Pilot or co-Pilot after all passengers are strapped in and doors closed. Jeez, how many times have I seen a machine depart and on the first turn a chain saw or something sails out an unlatched baggage door!

 

If you have an Engineer with you and he is on the ball, he will open engine panels after startup and have a quick peek for leaks etc. and have another quick look at the machine. Remember, there is no such thing as too many people looking at a machine.

 

As for signouts, do whatever your company requires.

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Me thinks you guys are letting rules and regulations replace good old common sense and standard aviation practice.

 

Always do a DI on a machine either the evening before or the morning of a flight. Should be done by an Engineer or a Pilot trained on type. This includes removal of covers such as T/R drive shaft covers etc. It doesn't matter what the friggen "book" says, it's just common sense to have a good indepth look at the machine once a flying day that will save your arse some day.

 

A preflight is done by the Pilot just prior to the first takeoff of the day and entails opening latched panels and having a look inside with a good flashlight. I am constantly amazed by the number of Pilots that do not do a preflight. They just ask the Engineer--Good to go? and jump in. Absolute idiocy!! Once again, just common sense that will save your sorry arse one day. No Engineer is bulletproof. He/She can miss things very easily.

 

Now something that nobody has mentioned. "The walkaround" The walkaround is always done immediatly prior to every flight and is always done by the Pilot or co-Pilot after all passengers are strapped in and doors closed. Jeez, how many times have I seen a machine depart and on the first turn a chain saw or something sails out an unlatched baggage door!

 

If you have an Engineer with you and he is on the ball, he will open engine panels after startup and have a quick peek for leaks etc. and have another quick look at the machine. Remember, there is no such thing as too many people looking at a machine.

 

As for signouts, do whatever your company requires.

Thats pretty much all standard common sense that most everyone knows and does. of course there is the odd mistake or exception. just like anything I suppose.

the topic at hand is why transport indicated the DI sign out wasn't required. Probably because there is no DI requirement by the manufacturer insp. program or the operators approved maintenance schedule. most 206's and astars are in the field without engineers. I don't think many operators would enhance their insp. program on a 206 to the point where they would need to have an engineer with it to sign out daily inspections.

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Thats pretty much all standard common sense that most everyone knows and does. of course there is the odd mistake or exception. just like anything I suppose.

the topic at hand is why transport indicated the DI sign out wasn't required. Probably because there is no DI requirement by the manufacturer insp. program or the operators approved maintenance schedule. most 206's and astars are in the field without engineers. I don't think many operators would enhance their insp. program on a 206 to the point where they would need to have an engineer with it to sign out daily inspections.

 

Whoa there Bucko!!! Are you trying to tell me there is another type of helicopter other than the Bell 212?? Say it ain't so!!

 

The point I was trying to make OP was that regardless of what Transport, Manufacturers or Companys say about signouts or requirements, DIs, Preflights and walkarounds should always be done regardless of of any rules or regs that say it's not required. This CAN be done by a trained Pilot.You should always make an entry in the log as well just to cover your arse. There is no rule anywhere that says you can't. There is nothing stopping a Pilot from doing a DI if the 'book' says it's not required. Why any Manufacturer or Helicopter company would put in writing that a DI is not required is beyond my comprehension. They are basically saying that thier product can go 50-100 hours (whatever) safely without anyone looking at it. Dumb, real dumb.

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Perhaps a slightly more morbid look at it, but a good reason to sign out a DI even if it isn't 'required' is that if things go snakey it is on record that the pilot had a look and determined it was safe to go. Could make a difference in the legal end of it after the fact.

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