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dumb dog

Long Lining?

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Two engines just means you have the chance for twice as many problems.How about the old saying "the second engine will take you to the scene of the crash". Single or twin a engine failure is a bad thing pucker up hold on cause you are along for the ride and try to keep from screaming all the way down.

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Two engines just means you have the chance for twice as many problems.How about the old saying "the second engine will take you to the scene of the crash". Single or twin a engine failure is a bad thing pucker up hold on cause you are along for the ride and try to keep from screaming all the way down.

 

 

 

People who use that saying either haven't flown twin helicopters or have flown them with no thought as to flying at a weight and altitude that allows them to fly away. Sure, at gross weight in a hover your going to descend , however it is a whole lot less work and a lot softer at the end.

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Sooo...if two engines make things safer in the engine bay then why don't we all demand a second pilot of equal or greater experience sitting beside us all the time because, really, the pilot fails more often than anything on board the aircraft? That would make things safer.........wouldn't it?????

 

:):)

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Sooo...if two engines make things safer in the engine bay then why don't we all demand a second pilot of equal or greater experience sitting beside us all the time because, really, the pilot fails more often than anything on board the aircraft? That would make things safer.........wouldn't it?????

 

:):)

 

.... and stewardesses too!

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Is it wise for anyone to willingly fly an aircraft beyond its capabilities?

 

I don't have a Flight manual in front of me, but I am pretty sure that a height velocity diagram is NOT a limitation, it is a capability/performance chart. Environmental conditions, geographical area, weather/wind and training should help to mitigate any risk -- especially training and experience.

 

As part of my training background, we often entered autorotation to touchdowns inside the edge of that chart.

 

Additionally, every "normal" approach you complete (aka the standard site picture and walking pace) goes right through the middle of that chart.

 

So it is good to be aware of the performance of the aircraft and plan and train for the what-ifs as you may be suggesting.

 

Good concerns help us to be safer.

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While many aircraft flight manuals don't include the Height-Velocity Diagram in the Limitations section...some do. The Bell 205 A1 for instance has an HV diagram in the limitations section, while the Bell 206 B, 206L, Eurocopter AS350 all have the HV curve in the Performance section.

Longlining in single engine aircraft is all I've ever done. What percentage of helicopters do you think operating VFR in Canada are twins??? Unfortunately that's not likely going to change until customers are willing to pay the extra tarrif (that is required to cover the extra maintenance costs) for a machine with less performance. I don't see this happening in my lifetime.

While longlining does put the pilot in the HV diagram, one could argue that shortlining in a cofined area, close to the ground poses it's own inherent risks. Look at how many t/r strikes,blade strikes and roll overs happen every year and compare it to the amount of engine failures.

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For your consideration;

 

Loss of engine power accounted for 31% of the single turbine first event category accidents.

Loss of engine power accounted for 13% of the twin turbine first event category accidents.

 

Airframe/component failure accounted for 30% of the twin turbine first event category accidents.

Airframe/component failure accounted for 12% of the single turbine first event category accidents.

 

First event is the physical event that adversly affected the rotorcraft or unusual occurance that the aircrew became aware of.

 

We train for engine failures throughout our careers.

 

Some airframe component failures can be very difficult or impossible to train for.

 

Taken from NASA US Rotorcraft Accident Study.

 

Wayne

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In addition to the previous post, according to the NTSB, nearly 45% of all first event

loss of power accidents, twin or single turbine, can be directly traced to human error.

(Fuel/Air mixture, fuel starvation, fuel exhaustion, fuel contamination)

20 minute reserves?

 

Wayne

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