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gwk

A Good Call Guys!

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Only if i f*ck it up....cheers.

 

Now I know why I like my heli-logging world.....the d!ckheads like this, at least stay out of the cockpit where we work !!!

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"Yes, I agree with Auto Relight on that one. If it wasn't the main blades it would have been the tail rotor next. Bush rule number 1 in a confined, never turn around the mast, always turn around the mast"

 

I do not understand the above comment.

 

Disclaimer, I am a pilot, and yes helicopters, i have done lots of off airport landing and flown for the police. I am a current BCAS paramedic. I did my first medevac, as a paramedic in the early 1990's a lot has changed for the better since.

 

This was an unfortunate accident, I have had my own, as have some of the rest of you.

 

Looking backwards through the thread, let's correct some stuff. BCAS and HJ always fly dual pilot.

 

If you think for a second that BCAS does not have a policy and procedure for this and every other thing they do, then you just do not know BCAS.

BCAS has a whole course on just the criteria on when the helicopter is used without a specific call for it. It is called AutoLaunch.

 

Yes, the S76a models are short on power a lot of the time but every one is aware of that, pilot, co-pilot, paramedics and sometimes even the family of the injured person who wants to go with the patient but is advised that it is not possible do to weight restrictions. The S76c are in BC right now getting fitted out to replace these old A models. They should go on line this summer.

 

For the guy who comically suggested that we have a cute 105 lb flight paramedic, I have never seen one. We do have some very talented women in the service and the sight of a woman ground paramedic is common in both in the rural and urban setting. We always fly with two flight paramedics in the standard BCAS and HJ response. In the north and very rural areas things are not as structured. By the time you have amassed the experience, training, seniority on a ground ambulance to even apply for flight paramedic training you have probably put in 10 or 15 years minimum on a high volume ground ambulance. I can tell you from experience that 10 years in the downtown east side as a paramedic ages you, mentally and physically.

 

The pilot flying had a momentary lapse in judgement and situational awareness at the same time. The second pilot did not correct that. It happens.

 

To suggest the either HJ or BCAS cowboy around or take unknown risks, is just wrong. There is no one at HJ I would not fly with including these two pilots, and as for the paramedic, there is no one in BC that one would be happier to see at a medical emergency more than these highly trained folks.

 

As I read some of the previous comments I am reminded of my two favorite quotations

 

Never confuse repetition of a mistake for experience

 

I have one hour experience 3000 times.

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For the guy who comically suggested that we have a cute 105 lb flight paramedic, I have never seen one.

 

I'm sure R.H. was 105 lbs at some point in time. Cute.... the jury is still out on that. :prop:

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I'm sure R.H. was 105 lbs at some point in time. Cute.... the jury is still out on that. :prop:

 

 

Hmmmm. I would say maneuvering in a confined area should be avoided. Then again I was not there, not sure if A model could have vertical'd out above obstacles. When I was at helijet there were a few Captains with very little bush time who had a nasty habit of pulling in power at the last minute.. This made for a few pucker factor landings at the Victoria pad. But what do I know just the co-jo with 3 time the flight hours. Hmmm Hmmmm.

 

Glad everyone made on ground safely...

 

P5

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Now I know why I like my heli-logging world.....the d!ckheads like this, at least stay out of the cockpit where we work !!!

 

 

You missed the context of that comment Sir.

 

The poster indicated he would just like to stand over me and tell me i was doing it wrong with no indication I was.

I'm not perfect, but he has no basis for his logic what so ever. At least not in this argument.

 

So, as fairness would dictate, he may call me out on an error, ONLY when one was noted.

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"The pilot flying had a momentary lapse in judgement and situational awareness at the same time. The second pilot did not correct that. It happens"

 

 

 

 

 

My last foray into this topic and I'm done...

 

Lets take your "it happens" statement and change who I am for a minute. I am not a 22ish year experienced AME in this industry, nor am I a fireman tasked with setting up an LZ.

 

I am a father of a 3 year old girl who is in the back of said air ambulance on her way to sick kids after taking a tumble off a swing set.

Before my eyes I watch this scenario unfold. In spectacular fashion #### happens, and my daughter is entwined in a wreckage, dead from the ensuing fire.

 

Now what do you think is gonna happen? am i gonna simply go "****, sh*t happens", am I gonna just go give the pilot a hug and tell him good job for not killing me as a bystander, Am I gonna look at history and go "well they saved alot of other lives"

 

No, I'm going to jump on a bandwagon, create my own, contact lawyers who's sole purpose is ripping people new a-holes and many citizens will follow and I would be out to hang the pilot, hang the operator and hang the medical community providing the service because they either had no landing zone policy or flagrantly abused it. Past experience would not be a factor in my relentless quest to change the system.

 

So, sh*t happens for a reason. and if anyone wants to keep going with their continued support go right ahead. As far as i am concerned, there is no place for cutting corners when innocent lives are on the line. Thats my stance, thats my view, take it or leave it.

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"Yes, I agree with Auto Relight on that one. If it wasn't the main blades it would have been the tail rotor next. Bush rule number 1 in a confined, never turn around the mast, always turn around the mast"

 

He meant to say "Never turn around the mast, always turn around the tail"

 

H56, SuddenStop is a non pilot so we are all safe :D

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