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Flying With Doors Off

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MMike,

Thank you for pointing out those numbers.

However they apply to design and maintenance criteria of seat belts in the AWM.

This discussion is about the use of seat belts. CAR 605.22 - 605.28.

 

Can you please find the American Regulations for digging yourself deeper into a hole by trying to back-pedal out of a previous one ???

 

What hole? You''re the one picking a fight.

 

Suck it.

 

I'm out.

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What hole? You''re the one picking a fight.

 

Suck it.

 

I'm out.

 

MMike, although the layout and number sequencing of the CARS and FARS are similar, the actual regulations can be quite different. The numbers relate to the topic or headline of the regulation, not the regulation itself. For example you will find many differences in 571, 573, 624, 625, 702, 703...need I go on?

 

If you are going to quote regulation, quote from the correct airworthiness authority. It's pretty simple.

 

RTR

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Years ago I was working as Flight medic on a bike race. We had a young German guy in the back with doors off. Big camera on his shoulder that had a hasty harness attacher and the other end attached to the seatbelt around his waist. As we were in a banking treetop turn he slid the camera over and the hasty harness strap caught the seatbelt and "Flip" open it came and the seatbelt fell away. Even with my helmet on in the front I heard this and immediately knew what had happened. As I quickly told the pilot that the camera man had unclipped we came out of the turn, I looked into the very large eyes of the shooter as he slid quickly into the middle. Next time duct tape was used to keep the seatbelt shut, with a knife handy if we needed to cut the seatbelt quick to get out in case of emergency.

 

Lesson learned, now injuries thank GOD.

 

Fly safe all Go Bless

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Years ago I was working as Flight medic on a bike race. We had a young German guy in the back with doors off. Big camera on his shoulder that had a hasty harness attacher and the other end attached to the seatbelt around his waist. As we were in a banking treetop turn he slid the camera over and the hasty harness strap caught the seatbelt and "Flip" open it came and the seatbelt fell away. Even with my helmet on in the front I heard this and immediately knew what had happened. As I quickly told the pilot that the camera man had unclipped we came out of the turn, I looked into the very large eyes of the shooter as he slid quickly into the middle. Next time duct tape was used to keep the seatbelt shut, with a knife handy if we needed to cut the seatbelt quick to get out in case of emergency.

 

Lesson learned, now injuries thank GOD.

 

Fly safe all Go Bless

 

And that is why (IMHO) you should never use the seat belt to secure a guy hanging out a door!

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If they're hanging out the door a proper harness is the only way to go.

 

I had a photographer working inside the cabin with doors off inadvertently unbuckled himself moving the camera around or changing lenses or something like that. Hence the use of a single wrap of electrical tape.

 

DM

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Guest bag swinnger

Having been on a few doors off, air to air photo shoots, I have seen some close calls and full on emergencies both on the photo ship and the helicopter being photographed. So I now travel world wide with with my own harness, equivalent to the ones used in class "D" loads. I also believe in and use a special chest/shoulder harness for my cameras. A ten pound camera falling from a couple hundred feet can do some damage, especially if it was to hit another aircraft flying below me.

 

Are my harnesses approved by anyone? Nope, just my own ideas for self preservation. The idea is to keep my main harness adjusted to the correct length to keep me from going beyond the door frame, not to support me if I was to fall out, although it would. This set up would likely be completely usless in a crash but is the best that I am aware of and better than anything that was ever provided for me. The shoulder harness holds onto two cameras and the idea there is that I never have to change lenses and the whole camera stays within reach at all times.

 

As a pilot flying with the doors off, the only incidents that I have had worth mentioning. Were the two different times that the Astar door trim has tried to depart due to improper adjustment. One caught by a passenger before it was completely gone. Another that I quickly had to grab before it departed, keep that one in mind when securing your machine for doors off flight.

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I also believe in and use a special chest/shoulder harness for my cameras. A ten pound camera falling from a couple hundred feet can do some damage, especially if it was to hit another aircraft flying below me.

 

Bags are you using the Cotton Carrier harness? I find it great even on the ground when packing two cameras and lenses

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So you've got this great harness - but what do you attach it to?

 

A while ago we were using an L4 for some doors off work. The only thing in the back that seemed acceptable were the seat-belt attachments. Didn't have the "D" ring things in the hat rack you could use in a plain jane jetbox.

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