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Winnie

Tool-Kits For Pilots

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so, sitting in the bush, near Reservoir Manicougan, in Northern Quebec. AS I have a day with not much to do, I cleaned the machine, did some other tasks, cleaned out my tent (dang there is a lot of sand here...).

 

I got to thinking, what tools do you pilots bring in the field? I have a small toolkit with lock-wire pliers, regular pliers, screw driver with various tips, a few wrenches etc. What else should I bring?

 

I am thinking a complete set of tools to overhaul the GPI pump would be a good idea, but I think my 3/8 wrench/socket pretty much covers it except maybe for large pliers??

 

Any other good ideas?

 

Obviously can't be too much, as it has to go in the baggage!

 

(And also, no joking about being a pilot and not touching the machine, since I am alone, no engineer on my jet-box...)

Cheers

Harald

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so, sitting in the bush, near Reservoir Manicougan, in Northern Quebec. AS I have a day with not much to do, I cleaned the machine, did some other tasks, cleaned out my tent (dang there is a lot of sand here...).

 

I got to thinking, what tools do you pilots bring in the field? I have a small toolkit with lock-wire pliers, regular pliers, screw driver with various tips, a few wrenches etc. What else should I bring?

 

I am thinking a complete set of tools to overhaul the GPI pump would be a good idea, but I think my 3/8 wrench/socket pretty much covers it except maybe for large pliers??

 

Any other good ideas?

 

Obviously can't be too much, as it has to go in the baggage!

 

(And also, no joking about being a pilot and not touching the machine, since I am alone, no engineer on my jet-box...)

Cheers

Harald

 

Without a shadow of a doubt Harald, a leatherman (or something similar) will serve you well. You will have pliers, knife , screwdrivers, file etc.etc. all in one tool. Mine has bailed me out of a lot of situations.

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I won't tell you what to take, or advise you on what you could take apart to fix.

Do what you gotta do to survive (and thats the key. More on that below)

But, and a BIG but, be prepared to explain yourself. At the little end to your engineer, all the way up to the big end in a court of law if need be. On why, based on your qualifications, felt it was necessary to fix something instead of stay put and wait for help to arrive, knowing full well, you could potentially cause bigger grief by your attempt. Imagine me with enough dual stick time to manage flight, taking it upon myself to get us back home after the pilot gets eaten by a grizzly bear? not such a good idea, unless staying there assured impending death myself.

 

Personally, I have never worked for a company that would not send a second ship (even contracted by the competition) to fly you out, or an engineer back on scene that day, or the next to ensure the serviceablity to fly it out safely.

 

Whatever you do, if you want to be prepared, talk to your engineer and have him properly train you on what he's comfortable having you fix. He should at least know.

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Some good advice here. Another point - whatever tools you take with you should be high quality - buy the best you can afford and look after them.

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No hammer, duct tape or zip ties?

 

There you go MM. A sensible post. Not so hard is it??

In addition to the above, electrical tape, and most definatly a 10"-12" pair of waterpump pliers.

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I won't tell you what to take, or advise you on what you could take apart to fix.

Do what you gotta do to survive (and thats the key. More on that below)

But, and a BIG but, be prepared to explain yourself. At the little end to your engineer, all the way up to the big end in a court of law if need be. On why, based on your qualifications, felt it was necessary to fix something instead of stay put and wait for help to arrive, knowing full well, you could potentially cause bigger grief by your attempt. Imagine me with enough dual stick time to manage flight, taking it upon myself to get us back home after the pilot gets eaten by a grizzly bear? not such a good idea, unless staying there assured impending death myself.

 

Personally, I have never worked for a company that would not send a second ship (even contracted by the competition) to fly you out, or an engineer back on scene that day, or the next to ensure the serviceablity to fly it out safely.

 

Whatever you do, if you want to be prepared, talk to your engineer and have him properly train you on what he's comfortable having you fix. He should at least know.

 

Good post SS. I agree on all points.

I have seen Pilots do some real stupid things on aircraft. One guy named John flying a yellow 212 was caught by me removing the antitwist rod from the belly hook. I asked him if he was prepered to make a log book entry and do a W&B ammendment. He put it back on. The best one is the Pilots that carry an Allan wrench so they can jack up the TCU in the 212. I kid you not!!

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ouch.

 

I used to carry a small tool bag with most everything I thought I may need.

I rarely used it and found I could use the weight more efficiently. I now carry a large leatherman, Curve,I think... and throw it into my helmet bag once in the field.

It has served me well many a time, as mentioned previously. Beyond that, unless there are extreme circumstances, the maintenance department can handle issues.

They do it waayyy better than I do anyway.

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I think everyone here is on the same page that pilots should not be taking on any maintenance that is beyond the scope of their elementary work and servicing training that they've rec'd from the operator(C.Y.A.). However, a little troubleshooting on the pilot's part can do a lot to help the engineer who is coming out to the bush.

 

I would recommend a half decent digital multi meter for troubleshooting both airframe and ops gear electrical snags

 

Wire crimper/stripper tool and assorted butt connectors and ring terminals

 

Hex keys for replacing radios as well as some ops gear (bambi bucket)

 

A good flashlight

 

Spare grease gun fittings(these always seem to grow legs or disappear)

 

10" adj wrench if you have room

 

Just a basic set of wrenches and sockets req'd to remove/install cowlings and non-structural panels(t/r gearbox cowl for servicing, fwd nose panel to replace landing light bulb and so on)

 

I could go on but thats already more than most guys carry with them...

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