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My advice to anybody crossing over from VFR ops to IFR ops is to get a solid VFR background first. It will only benefit you later in your career with decision making, hands and feet and also a reliable back-up if you want to go back to the VFR world later in life.

 

By a solid VFR background I suggest a wide variety of experiences including but not limited to forestry/mountain/arctic/precision longline etc. 1500+ hours would be a minimum.

 

Of course that's not required but I do think it's to your advantage!

 

Good luck,

ttf

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Having twin PIC time is a definite plus but the majority of new IFR crew I have met do not have any twin experience.

 

I've heard the same rumours about bush guys going to the IFR game later in their career and I know more who made the transition then those who didn't. I'm talking about guys with about 20 years bush time.

 

I think there is a far greater problem of guys joining the multi/IFR game with too little PIC experience.

 

For the record I do know many pilots who crossed over with very few hours and are tremendously successful and happy.

 

Make opportunities where you can and take advantage of them!

 

Enjoy the vfr operations you're on now as you're sure to miss it once you do crossover.

 

Cheers,

ttf

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I believe it is hard to get twin pic time without having an IFR rating... not much work out there except with a few 355s flying in the bush for oil companies.

Currently it seems to be hard to get hired with a limited number of jobs available with low hours since there are quite a few experienced VFR pilots with IFR rating waiting for that opportunity as well.

 

good luck!

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Thanks for all the replies! I agree that it would be a good idea to be a well rounded pilot in the VFR world before starting in the IFR side of things.

 

What interests me the most about the IFR world is the jobs that get done, be it HEMS or offshore somewhere else in the world. I am likely jumping the gun when it comes to thinking about the group IV......

 

What would the magic # be for hours?

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It really depend what type of IFR job you wanna do. EMS usually require 500 hrs, when offshore require more. As said in a post above, try to get some multi PIC time before moving IFR, it will be at your advantage in a long term. And don t forget to enjoy the freedom of the VFR world... Once IFR you will really have to stick to the rules. Both world are cool in my opinion.

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I don't work IFR, but I currently hold the certs (FAA). If I could do it all over again I would have got it right out of the gate, like so many of my FAA buddies did. much cheaper (requirements overlapping) and you learn a lot in the IFR program that helps in the VFR world.

 

if you're going to go IFR, I'd recommend converting it over to FAA while it's still fresh in your head, why not open twice as many doors?

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not in the US, but internationally, you betcha. FAA reg ships outnumber canadian ones 10-1, an FAA license makes sense if you want to work outside of Canada.

 

if you're doing the FAA IFR program, do the whole thing at night. it's legit, you're not looking outside anyways, and now you magically have a wack of night hours to put on your resume.

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