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Keeping Current


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Most folks here on the forum sound like they're flying regularly, but here's some questions for the lowtimers and former lowtimers that went a while between flights:

 

Outside of actually flying, what did you do to keep your 'head in the game' so to speak?

 

I have flight manuals, an old CFS, and textbooks from school, but I'm wondering if there are other resources I'm missing. Anyone have any practice exams or good PPC questions or anything like that?

 

Concerning flying - did you do any recurrent training with a school, how often did you do it, and how many hours each time? What training did you cover i.e. emergencies, confines, etc?

 

Once you did get an interview (or a job), was there anything that you wished you'd done differently (for example, more flight time, a better understanding of VNC charts, and so on)?

 

Chief pilots, training pilots: Are there common weaknesses that you see amongst lowtimers and new hires?

 

I'm trying to keep myself PPC-ready as best I can. As always, thanks for any and all feedback!

 

- Darren

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When I was hired as a full time pilot it had been around 5 years since I trained, had the odd chance to get some dual time between but I was definitely out of the game. The flying part comes back very quick. I wish I had stayed more current with the charts, weather, and radio work because I struggled with those during my PPC.

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Flingwinger,

 

Thanks for your response; that's exactly the sort of feedback I was looking for.

 

- Darren

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Hey Daz,

 

Ditto on the studying. Keep your head in the game. Check weather daily, plan imaginary flights to places you haven't been, review regs, read the AIM regularly, etc...

 

You can do the ICAO conversion of your TC commercial to the FAA private with just paperwork. Then you can fly in the US for $200. hour or less to stay current every now and then.

 

Get a flight simulator and practise instrument flying. Look at google earth for an area that interests you, plan a flight there like it's the real thing, dial in the simulator and fly there.

 

Practise with the mop and broom, those skills are the most important for getting hired!

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Some good stuff here.

I feel for you Daz...Learning to fly a helicopter in quite an accomplishment that one should be proud of. However, getting that first gig is tough and feeling your skills rusting in not pleasant. :down:

I've seen guys and gals keep themselves in the poor house saving up and going flying when they can. You need to realize when and where to spend your funds to get the best bang for your buck. I don't recommend the former as you will stay somewhat sharp but poor.

If you are going to get hired you will be invited for a check ride. The hiring company will probably be riding 5 or 6 guys/gals at the same time.

This is when you pull out the bucks and get an hour or two just before.

You don't have to be good 'cause we know you only have 100 hrs.....you just have to be better than all the others in the room. :up:

That's my two cents and I wholeheartedly agree with the other statements. ANYTHING to keep your head in the game! P.M. me if you like as I may have some reference or study material laying around.

Good luck on the coast and NEVER give up!

Max

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Guest 47yrLowTimer

Mac hit the nail on the head.

 

Beg borrow or steal the $ for few hours just before your check ride.

 

Try and get your hands on a set of generic emerg. Procedures and study the till they are part of your being.

Chances are this alone may land you your first job in itself. Regardless it will prevent you from being the deer in the headlights when things go south, and could very well save the lives of you and your passengers or ground crew.

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I made a program for the computer a while ago to help me keep fresh on regulations and bell 206 stuff. It just pops up a random question every so many minutes, which you can answer in your head and then confirm by clicking the 'show answer' button. Works great for guys like me that sit on the computer lots doing random things. It's a nice way to passively study.

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Thank you all for the suggestions, PMs, and kind words of encouragement. They're all very much appreciated!

 

- Darren

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