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Guest JetboxJockey

Flying Us Reg Machine In Canada

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I believe it depends on who has "care and control" via lease. See Over-Talk's post with CARs reference.

 

There are N tailfeathered aircraft operated in Canada on Canadian Operating Certificates and must be flown with Canadian pilots. Aircraft are leased by the Canadian Company.

There are N tailfeathered aircraft operated in Canada on US OC under NAFTA. Pilots must be US licenced.

 

There are also C registered aircraft leased into the states operated by US operator under a US OC and must by flown by a US certificated pilot. Aircraft are leased by the American Company.

There are also C registered aircraft flown in the US under NAFTA and must be flown by Canadian pilots.

 

After that is all said, the pilots operating in the 'other' country (either Can or the USA) must have immigration authority to work there, which is a whole nuther story!

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Can a Canadian with Canadian license fly a US registered machine legally in Canada for hire? I've searched the CAR's and but can't find a definitive answer.

No you can not! Not without a student pilot permit at least, for commercial work must be com. license. Of course TC can always make exceptions.(unlikely)

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When I got my FAA licence the FAA inspector told me that they only care about U.S. airspace. If the aircraft is N registered you need an FAA licence to fly it in U.S. airspace...outside U.S. airspace you can fly N reg a/c with whatever that country deems legal. He did say it was legal to fly an N registered a/c in Canada with a CDN licence.

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Guest 47yrLowTimer

When I got my FAA licence the FAA inspector told me that they only care about U.S. airspace. If the aircraft is N registered you need an FAA licence to fly it in U.S. airspace...outside U.S. airspace you can fly N reg a/c with whatever that country deems legal. He did say it was legal to fly an N registered a/c in Canada with a CDN licence.

 

I'll look into that. Thank you

 

A 61 endorsement on my Canadian license would be nice..

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I fly in the USA with a canadian reg a/c ...;)if it had an US reg I would need a faa license...diferent rules for each country me thinks...as mentioned it probably all has to do with $$$$ grab :P

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Guest 47yrLowTimer

Finally got a definitive answer from the FAA's Denis Hamel in Albany, New York. He oversees all FAA international operations. I short, you must have a FAA (license) certificate if the aircraft is registered in the US of A regardless of where it's flown.

 

There are some exceptions when it comes to leased US machines operating in Canada but that's it.

At least as far as the FAA is concerned.

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A few weeks ago I asked a TC buddy about a FAA pilot flying a Canadian registered helicopter in the US, not for hire (a little different than your original question) and here is his answer;

 

Here's the Litmus Test on this:

"A Canadian can fly a Canadian registered helicopter anywhere in the world and can fly a helicopter registered anywhere in the world other than Canadian, only in Canada"

This applies to any IATA country like the US, so, yes, a US pilot can fly a Canadian registered helicopter in the US! Sounds complicated but not really. Here endeth the lesson!

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