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Daz

Your First 1000 Hours

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Don't have much time to write as i have to get out to the machine shortly but if there is one thing i can say about success in this industry, you have to learn to suck up to and kiss the a$$es of some real s o b's because unfortunately this industry is FULL of them and lots are in positions of influence just by virtue of the fact that they have been around for eons. Just nod and smile and say "wow, really! Is that what you did?" Like someone else mentioned (in another thread) it's all about HUGE egos in this biz and some of these fine people will take it upon themselves to call around and make sure you never get work if you show any back bone and stand up for yourself.

 

 

Please come back the moment you have something else to say, hanging off the edge of seat, waiting to find out if you brought the machine back safely.

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Please come back the moment you have something else to say, hanging off the edge of seat, waiting to find out if you brought the machine back safely.

There you go again making assumptions, the machine didn't go anywhere, i just went out brush the snow off and give it a DI to make sure it could. Just doing my job... Did you look up the IP address of that last post, it was different and so is this one. Wow hey!

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Whitestone, why so defensive? It's just a stupid internet forum, don't let it bug you!

 

 

Since starting flying I've worked for (and with) lots of folks with big egos. I'm probably one of those "big ego" people! Nothing wrong with a big ego: it's probably a neccesary quality if one's going to tackle the risky business of owning or operating a helicopter business, let alone managing a bunch of prima donna pilots. :) I've always seen in them qualities that I respect. I haven't, and never will, work for someone I consider a douche-bag!

 

Here's my "survival strategy":

  1. Treat yourself with respect, you're a professional with considerable responsibility and authority.
  2. Treat the boss with respect, after all she or he IS the BOSS!
  3. If you have to say no or be disagreeable do it in a respectful way.
  4. Don't worry if the other person has a hissy-fit, it's not your problem.
  5. Repeat as often as needed.

 

Good luck!

 

Dick Mitten

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"Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room!!" wink.gif

 

One of the best and most useful courses I was ever on was the CAA's Module 1 of the Level 2 Avalanche Operations program. It was a week of training human factors and decision making, and much of it was taken directly from the aviation world. One notable thing I learned there was that conflict is not a bad thing - it allows professionals in high risk fields (like flying and avalanche mitigation) to question or challenge each other's decisions/actions in the name of safety (among other goals).

 

However, when you mix big egos (and there are more than a few of those in the avalanche world!) with a wide spectrum of personalities and "philosophical differences", then the conflict can easily turn from productive discussion to petty squabbling. The best people I've worked with and for are those that do have pretty big egos, but also the ability to rein them in.

 

Dick, your survival strategy is spot on, and I'm on the same page. However, as a helicopter newbie, I find I sometimes need to boost my own ego and remind myself that - though inexperienced - I AM a trained professional. It can be intimidating walking into a hangar full of high time pilots with my 200-hour resume!

 

Back on track - Erin's in nursing school until May of 2013, so our home is here in Vancouver until then. After that' she's fine with relocating wherever I need to be to get my career moving. With her nursing degree she'll likely be able to find work anywhere (hey, at least one of us will have steady incomebiggrin.gif).

 

That leaves this summer, and there's every likelihood that I'll be moving away for work. I might even get lucky and find a rotation that lets me come home during days off. If not, then we can certainly survive a few months apart.

 

I like how these threads can go sideways in interesting ways. Thanks for your input and PM's.

 

- Darren

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Darren

i don't mean to be rude here but you should let your laptop on the desktop and get your but out there bugging poeple...

Unless you allready got a job..for shure.

 

There is a never seen beffore(Or since long time ago) amount of opotunity's for lowtimer out there..

 

No reason for a well rounded person to be unemployed.

 

So long and good luck.

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Darren

i don't mean to be rude here but you should let your laptop on the desktop and get your but out there bugging poeple...

 

 

You're not being rude at all - you're absolutely right. In fact, I did just get back from a mini-road trip; I had been one of 50 or so people chasing down a much sought after low timer position at a big company (you'll find that discussion somewhere on the Vertical boards...). Although I made it to the short list for official interviews, I didn't make the final cut. Very disappointing, but also a wake-up call in some regards.

 

I have a few more weeks left in my current (non-flying) job before I'm laid off for the summer, then I'm on the road. I know sooner is better (like right now!), but quite frankly I need those last couple paycheques in order to afford the April road trip. I also don't wanna burn that bridge by quitting, as it's gainful winter employment if I need it next season.

 

There is a never seen beffore(Or since long time ago) amount of opotunity's for lowtimer out there..

 

 

 

Good news, and this keeps me optimistic.

 

 

- Darren

 

 

 

 

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I went to a flight school who hired there own students, I was determined to be in the top students to graduate and I did :) I was a few years more mature then the other top students and probably worked in my favor! That first summer, I worked on the ground and with a spray program, when I returned back from a three or four months stint they told me I would get PPCd and I fortunately passed! That winter I got laid off, but still had the opportunity to do carnival rides to get close to 50 hours. The next spring with no promise of a full time flying position I was supposed to drive a truck for the spray program...The other low time pilot in the company (500hr) quit and without skipping a beat I jumped in his boots and left for an arctic job where there was a couple of helicopters working together...We had a camp to move, so I took that opportunity to teach myself how to longline !!! By the end of that season, I was moving drills in Northern Quebec in a Longranger. I hit 700 hours before Christmas, The next Year I returned to the arctic and flew 1000 hrs moving drills! I stayed with that company for 6 years and and when I left, I had a total of 4500 hours and checked out on 206, ASTAR and Medium... Ive been flying for ten years now and just shy of 7000 hrs, but I've worked my *** off to get where I am today, flying a 212 Single :) and most likely was a very huge contributing factor for my divorce, surprise surprise...

Ill always be grateful for the opportunity I received and when ever I cross DL I try to remind him :)

 

Fly safe and keep the blue side up!

 

François

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35 years ago things were a bit different!

 

Finished up my training in a 47 with Northern Mountain Helicopters, and at 100.2 hours, loaded it up and headed for the Yukon! That was in May - came home in September. No rotations, no days off (unless it rained) engineered my own machine and came home with 450 hours. Life was grand.

 

Next year upgraded to the 206 and never looked back. Moved on from there well before Walter & Bob (it was a good company back then) and just kept going. "Can you do it..." they asked? "Sure I can!" Bucketing, Drip torch, Long Line, Fires, Mining - just go do it.

 

Been at some good places, at one or two I chose not to work for any more, and finally ended up at a place where life is good. I like to think I've earned my place there, and try and give back whatever I can to make up for it - and it seems to work for both sides.

 

Tough for news guys for sure - but if you want it, don't ever pass up an opportunity until you have the experience to do so.

 

klw

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When i first started out i must have done about 4 big road trips and a few smaller ones. With some i found work right away and others took me all over western Canada and the Territories and no luck, even killed one truck. Looking back at my first road trip i can say that i didn't have a very good strategy, arriving unannounced AND giving up too soon. I was so poor that i was afraid to spend money on phone calls but this is a game like poker, you have to go ALL IN ! My next road trip that same spring yielded me a ground job (as promised) with a company that flew mediums and had no seat for me except a few co-jo ferry flights but it fueled the fire. Road trips yielded results in the form of a job for me about 75% of the time. I think operators are impressed with guys/gals who make the effort to show up at their door. One thing, don't show up unannounced, it is much better if you have some sort of "relationship" with the person potentially hiring you (phone a few times but don't be a pest, it's a fine line...) ,it is the better way in my opinion but not the only way.

 

As Sids Up said, don't pass up any opportunity, this INCLUDES hanging on to a job that keeps you from getting out there till it's too late and the hiring window has closed and believe me i know all about needing money to do the trip and the security of having that job in the fall when you potentially get laid off (my mistake at first too). I have done a lot of thinking about how i went about finding work and looking back i have to say that abandoning every thing and focusing 100% on finding a job is the better way of securing a job. Maybe in your situation you can't do that... Having said all that it's about timing too, just showing up when they need someone worked for me once too.

 

Once i had called a company and asked about work and they said they were full up but i sent a resume` anyway and then i called back in two weeks and the boss said "We might just have something for you....". Took the next day off work and got that job, turns out the guy they did hire did not work out so i was in and off i went. Worked a summer on the ground for them and then off flying that winter, worked hard in summer, didn't complain and it was noticed.

 

Looking for work i slept in my truck (Yes i am talking about sleeping in my truck inside two sleeping bags with three layers of clothes on! Late Winter on the Prairies and in the North, lol ! If you wait till it's warm enough someone like me who wants it more will scoop that job from you), showered at public pools, for a few bucks most would let you use the shower and get a shave, the only place that charged me full price was Winnipeg. Didn't eat in restaurants but bought simple nutritious foods at grocery stores and ate on the road, short stops and more driving. I have to laugh when i think back. Oh and don't go to your interview in crumpled travel clothes, save a good shirt (with a collar) and clean neat pants.

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How did you build your first thousand hours? Ground guy getting the odd ferry and non-rev opportunity? "Seat meat" co-Jo in a medium? Pipeline/oilfield flying? If you did it over again, would you do things differently?

 

Just curious to hear everyone's experiences - thanks in advance.

 

- Darren .

 

 

Unless they endorse you on type, you can't count any of the sandbag time in your long book in Canada. Certain FAA employers i've flown with have Counted my 500hrs of 214B bobble-heading in the total, but never in Canada.

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