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Degree That Works Well In Conjuncture With Helicopter Pilot

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You are most certainly welcome.

 

But alas I must correct you once again. If you recall, I'm a "real" engineer. Nor am I a scholar of the English language...just literate.

 

Again....bazinga.

 

In the age of "whatever . . . " the details still matter; not all that hard really. My browser has an online dickshunery.

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I'm not sure if you are agreeing with me......but I agree with you. Spelling does in fact matter....and as you said, it ain't that hard.

 

and I'm having a little fun with those here that get all worked up by the things I say. But (and just because it's a convenient example right now), you would think that a pilot who spends a fair amount of time in a hangar would know how to spell it. I think it's excusable for a pilot to not know how to spell spectrophotometer or something....not an every day word in a pilot's field. But "hangar"...come on.

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You are most certainly welcome.

 

But alas I must correct you once again. If you recall, I'm a "real" engineer. Nor am I a scholar of the English language...just literate.

 

Again....bazinga.

Remember a while back you were going to quit the site? Maybe you could revisit that thought... Oh and i do love The Big Bang Theory (especially Penny!) but you are not Sheldon (as in "hey look i am very clever and therefore funny") but maybe Wolowitz. Not disagreeing that there is a place for good grammar and spelling but why always take the effort to point it out to others. Contribute in a more positive way, you say you are an engineer so give some insight from your prospective, i am sure we could all learn something or at least it might give us something to think about. For now what most of us are thinking is you are such an a$$. I don't give a pinch of cold coon #### if Plumber puts his machine in a hangar or a hanger or if he parks it outside, i get it, i get what he meant. Same thing for the guys who post in English who are obviously from Quebec (well French as their first language), i get what they mean and APPRECIATE their contribution even if their English isn't perfect. I often think that i wish my French was as good as their English!

 

BTW My uncle was an engineer too, he worked for CN.

 

I know a few engineers too, "real" ones, maybe we could trade you in on one of them...

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I'm not sure if you are agreeing with me......but I agree with you. Spelling does in fact matter....and as you said, it ain't that hard.

 

and I'm having a little fun with those here that get all worked up by the things I say. But (and just because it's a convenient example right now), you would think that a pilot who spends a fair amount of time in a hangar would know how to spell it. I think it's excusable for a pilot to not know how to spell spectrophotometer or something....not an every day word in a pilot's field. But "hangar"...come on.

I do agree with you. As pilot, I'm always happy to see a maintenance engineer who looks out for detail. With things that leave the ground, this is a good quality. Of course generalizations are often risky, but a sloppy speller may be less scrupulous in other ways. All things being equal, I'd go with a good speller but wouldn't judge solely on that basis. I think there's still a place for some standards and discipline but they need not be burdensome.

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First off, a very good first post by "Deep Throat the third", you hit the nail on the head but with humor (second post in this thread).

 

There are two things that the "neanderthals" in any business hate and that is as CJM91 stated, people who are "smarter" and if i may add... (?) those who stand up for themselves. The psychology of making the employee feel indebted or worthless has little effect on one who has options but is terrifying to anyone who is not in a position to walk away, a fact well known to most in upper management. Education gives you options whether it be blue or white collar. It isn't always the smartest thing to let people know you are educated because you will seem (or be) a threat to them and they will gang up on you Yes, just like in grade school, remember that big bully? He became a helicopter pilot as well only this time he isn't stealing your lunch money he is stealing your livelihood and destroying your credibility because he fears you.

 

They make you an outcast because of your education and insight and the fact that you don't drop the "f-bomb" twice in every sentence but then would call on you for the very skills that separate you from the "unwashed" masses. I so hear you CJM91, i too just go about my business, do my job but no one gets the full package anymore, i have learned to keep that to myself. A while back i did slip up and got a very pointed question from a "boss" about my "experience" but i just shrugged it off saying i had watched a program on TV. LOL

 

A very good post too by P5 who seems to be one of the ones one this site who speaks for the most part what no one wants to hear but needs saying. (that this industry [and all others] is/are rotten, corrupt and filled with unintelligent backstabbers) I don't agree with everything he posts but his post in this thread is solid in my opinion, spelling mistake aside.(and really who gives a "dam" about that?)

 

 

As for wrenching and flying... i wouldn't do it. There are many who would and do but i have seen far too many guys get screwed by having to do both jobs, flying half asleep because you spent the night doing an inspection (duty day? no that was a duty NIGHT, totally different!) and NEVER being FAIRLY compensated for carrying both tickets. Do you think that your employer would ever say to you, "Hey Joe, you saved us a bundle on a plane ticket for that last inspection, here's $2000 for helping us out, we appreciate it!" Never in all my years have i seen that and if it is out there somewhere it is being kept a secret from me! Then there's the old argument that knowing how to wrench could save you from a night in the bush but it hasn't saved me so far, not saying it wouldn't or that it hasn't saved others, just not me so far. You'll have your plate full enough just being a pilot, that is if you are one of those few who is not afraid to pick up a broom or clean up the ops gear and so forth.

 

 

Well said... I wish I had your graceful way/words. Unfortunately my patience is zero, when dealing with or listening to what can only be a described as a systemic viral infection of pandemic proportion that has overtaken what once used to be a "gentlemanly" occupation and has now been devoured by the uncouth, who's main preoccupation is bullying under some delusional premiss of "god given belief or divine right "that they have some special skill or attitude that trumps all". This is the same high school mentality group who advocate this principal of the "cull". It's a frat bot club mentality and makes me want to break into projectile vomiting. Sorry I'll try to contain myself.......

 

I am still holding out hope that there will some magic pill that will come along one day. Or maybe fate will round the corner and once and for all eliminate the scourge of morons.

 

That is all.

 

P5

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Ah yes....the superior mentality types are bringing this thread to a higher level I see !!!???!

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Flash:

 

Getting the thread back on track and to summarize some of the comments that have been made. Daz had a good suggestion about the pilot operator route, a few companies in Alberta (and?) BC that use R-22's, R44's to service gas wells. Lots of take offs and landings and that is good quality flying for a beginner, you get to make some money and figure out the wind and how to load up the disk, etc..

 

Tour pilot is another route you might take, maybe there would be more of a white collar "flavor" to their operation but i bet you would still find lots of opportunity to operate the Mexican backhoe or swing a hammer. Icefield/Kananaskis cranks out lots of low hour guys though it's a steep learning curve and in light of this most recent accident i don't know how that will affect their ability to "extend an invitation" to low hour pilots. Not a comment on their management style, just from the insurance perspective. (I don't want to start an Icefield bashing thread)

 

Plumber and Taco Bell among others got to the heart of it in my opinion and if i may add or expand on that idea? An employer who is truly interested in getting you flying will be looking not only at your appearance and demeanor but what you can do around the hangar when you are not flying as it will take them a while to assess you and they like to get good value for the money they are not paying you in most cases (lol, little joke there...). As others have mentioned there is the "abuse" and in some cases it really is, you will be building this and cleaning that and painting the other thing. Another fav is they will get you to paint strip and everyone loves that. Remember to protect your eyes when you are doing all these other non flying tasks, there are no one eyed pilots out there that i know of. Helping out in camp too as someone mentioned is great and this is mostly getting your hands dirty, it will make you appreciated by the customer and they will ask for you to come back. If you are that guy who just sits in the cook house drinking coffee you will be less liked than the guy who mixes with the camp employees and gives a hand once in a while, it's a popularity contest after all.

 

It seems from what people are saying white collar is more for yourself, not saying that you wouldn't at some point use computer or "book" type learning in your flying career but speaking strictly VFR line pilot you are more likely to use blue collar skills. VFR flying for the most part is just like driving a taxi, people get in, you take them somewhere, they get out, do their thing and get back in and you take them home. Other times it's more like driving a pick up truck, you load up some stuff (usually heavy so you better have a strong back) and fly it some distance and unload it. This only gets worse as you drive the bigger machines, pails of mud, a really heavy water bucket, spares and so on.

 

There has been some really good info posted in this thread in amongst the other "stuff" so consider the points that have been made.

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Guest plumber

I'm not sure if you are agreeing with me......but I agree with you. Spelling does in fact matter....and as you said, it ain't that hard.

 

and I'm having a little fun with those here that get all worked up by the things I say. But (and just because it's a convenient example right now), you would think that a pilot who spends a fair amount of time in a hangar would know how to spell it. I think it's excusable for a pilot to not know how to spell spectrophotometer or something....not an every day word in a pilot's field. But "hangar"...come on.

I love the fact you think you work people up. That being said If you did go to university for your so called "REAL" engineering it would explain you arrogance and know it all attitude.

 

I for the most part worked out in camps so never spent a whole lot of time in hangars, but to get this forum back on track. The Pilot operating route was a great way to get started but with the price of natural gas companies are finding ways to cut the flying out.

 

Also gas companies are wanting to see pilots with 750-1500 hrs to start so getting a start is becoming harder. I enjoyed the Pilot/Op route for the fact it paid extremely well and is a great skill to have if one ever loses their medical.

 

My plumbing and construction skills were what the first company wanted due to the fact they were building crew houses and hangars.(my poor spelling never came up)

 

If my scholastic skills were better I highly doubt the trades or aviation would have been my first career choice.

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Ah yes....the superior mentality types are bringing this thread to a higher level I see !!!???!

Instead of saying nothing or adding a positive comment, you chose to diminish the discussion. Why?

 

If I misread your comment as sarcasm instead of humour, I apologize. Otherwise, what's wrong with going to a "higher level"?

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