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Easa Part 66 Engineer Licensing

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I am currently looking into writing the EASA/JARS Part 66 licensing exams at BCIT, and since their "Quality Assurance" Manager is on vacation I have some questions I'm looking for answers to. Hopefully yous guysh can shine some light on this for me.

 

Apparently there are quite a few different categories of licenses in the EASA system, I seem to be needing the A3/B1.3 category license to work on turbine powered helicopters.

 

To acquire that I need to write 13 exams, and to write exams I'm going to need some study material. That is my main issue right now, where do I find the information. I am having a hard time finding anything useful on the EASA site as of yet, hopefully someone gets back to me via e-mail.

 

Google found me this site: http://www.easa-66.eu/en/EASA-FAQ-EN.html

 

It seems legit except the site looks like it was designed in the dark ages of the internet. At $500 plus textbooks I am kind of hesitant though. Anybody heard of this place?

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Hi, you are right about what you need to do and also right about the EASA website, shockingly rubbish and very hard to find any info of what is needed.. I will give you a load of websites to use, but by far the best one is club66, as this gives practice questions and you can also sign up to all different type of support. I have used this one myself and have had no dramas with the easy modules. The harder modules, such as 3, 4 and 12 (just because of the size of the module and the amount of things the CAA ask you) I went and sat a course with LRTT (google that and you'll see)

 

http://club66pro.com/

http://www.airmech.co.uk/forums/index.php

http://www.caa.co.uk/default.aspx?catid=177&pagetype=68&gid=777

http://www.aircrafttechtrng.com/

http://www.helitavia.com/index.html

http://www.lrtt.co.uk/

 

These were some of the ones that were given to me when I was studying. The top two are the ones I used the most, air mech is the British version of this site and very good for info.

 

Hope this helps, good luck and if you need any more help just give me a shout.

 

 

 

quote name='cbox chip' timestamp='1341883010' post='142605']

I am currently looking into writing the EASA/JARS Part 66 licensing exams at BCIT, and since their "Quality Assurance" Manager is on vacation I have some questions I'm looking for answers to. Hopefully yous guysh can shine some light on this for me.

 

Apparently there are quite a few different categories of licenses in the EASA system, I seem to be needing the A3/B1.3 category license to work on turbine powered helicopters.

 

To acquire that I need to write 13 exams, and to write exams I'm going to need some study material. That is my main issue right now, where do I find the information. I am having a hard time finding anything useful on the EASA site as of yet, hopefully someone gets back to me via e-mail.

 

Google found me this site: http://www.easa-66.eu/en/EASA-FAQ-EN.html

 

It seems legit except the site looks like it was designed in the dark ages of the internet. At $500 plus textbooks I am kind of hesitant though. Anybody heard of this place?

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I am currently looking into writing the EASA/JARS Part 66 licensing exams at BCIT, and since their "Quality Assurance" Manager is on vacation I have some questions I'm looking for answers to. Hopefully yous guysh can shine some light on this for me.

 

Apparently there are quite a few different categories of licenses in the EASA system, I seem to be needing the A3/B1.3 category license to work on turbine powered helicopters.

 

To acquire that I need to write 13 exams, and to write exams I'm going to need some study material. That is my main issue right now, where do I find the information. I am having a hard time finding anything useful on the EASA site as of yet, hopefully someone gets back to me via e-mail.

 

Google found me this site: http://www.easa-66.eu/en/EASA-FAQ-EN.html

 

It seems legit except the site looks like it was designed in the dark ages of the internet. At $500 plus textbooks I am kind of hesitant though. Anybody heard of this place?

 

I would not go for a CAT-A licence, as you can only sign minor tasks you are trained for!

For the B1.3 helicopter technician turbine engines you must pass modules 1 to 10, 12 and 15.

 

See http://www.easa-66.eu/en/CoachingEN for the modules and how the system works!

 

The system www.easa-66.eu is part of www.EASA66.com and www.jartraining.de depending on your exam place!

 

In your case I would go to the BCIT in Vancouver. The above system has been preparing BCIT & selfstudy students for the EASA part 66 exam from the beginning on!

 

You do not need to buy any books for the system!

 

The way to get the EASA part 66 licence is as follows:

You start studying and book BCITexams after a study time of a month or two.

You can take a maximum of five modules per exam day!

You must consider three exam trips to complete all B1 or B2 modules.

While you are studying you complete your work experience logbook but you can also use your canadian logbook!

When you have completed all exams and your work experience log you apply on EASA form 19 for the licence at the UK-CAA!

 

More info is on http://www.easa-66.eu/table

 

Any more questions?

Do not hesitate to ask!

 

Otmar

 

PS: The $500 are for 13 or 14 modules, including essay training for modules 7,9 & 10

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Apparently there are quite a few different categories of licenses in the EASA system....

 

The EASA licence is subdivided in different categories:

CAT-A1 and B1.1 Aeroplanes Turbine (mechanical)

Exams you mast pass are M1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,15 & 17 (No M4 for CAT-A)

CAT-A2 and B1.2 Aeroplanes Piston (mechanical)

Exams you mast pass are M1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,16 & 17 (No M4 for CAT-A)

CAT-A3 and B1.3 Helicopters Turbine (mechanical)

Exams you mast pass are M1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,12 & 15 (No M4 for CAT-A)

CAT-A4 and B1.4 Helicopters Piston (mechanical)

Exams you mast pass are M1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,12 & 16 (No M4 for CAT-A)

CAT-B3 is for airplanes below 2000 kg

Exams you mast pass are M1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,16 & 17

Category B2 (avionics)

Exams you mast pass are M1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,13&14

Category C (Base Maintenance Certifying Engineer)

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Thanks a lot for the responses guys, and thanks for confirming that I can use my Transport Canada experience logbook. It was like Christmas when I found mine still lying in a box in my office.

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Hey all! Great topic as I have always wondered. So with the CAT-A3 and B1.3 does that mean you can work anywhere in the EU? Do you need both or do you get both upon completed said exams?

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Cbox,

 

There might be another way around it if you don't mind staying out of Europe for a while.

 

Australia has just transferred across to the Part 66 licensing system, I myself have a B1.3 and B1.4 licence.

 

Transferring your TC licence to a CASA licence isn't difficult by all accounts, depending on your assessor and licences, as little as one legislation exam.

 

The Australian licence isn't recognised in Europe yet but as the EASA licence is recognised in Australia, one would expect that it isn't too long until it works both ways.

 

There are also some very well paid jobs for turbine licensed engineers, particularly AS350 and 212 guys here as well.

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Interesting you should say that as one of the main reasons for me wanting the EASA license was to convert it to CASA. I'm a 212 guy too, trying to get into some overseas work and in the long run work on new iron.

 

I have also heard that the PNG license which is open book is recognized as by the CASA system and is another segway for getting a CASA license although I'm not sure how it makes it easier to get.

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Hey mate,

 

You can come to Australia, sit one air legislation exam and all of your licenses would be immediately transferred. At the moment, knowing you were a 212 guy, you'd be given B1.3 and B1.4 with B1.4 covering all piston engine helicopter airframes and engines.

 

It's certainly not as easy for an Aussie going the other way.

 

As for work overseas, I'd look at www.heviliftgroup.com for opportunities, I know they employ a few Canucks with tours out of Canada. If you're under 30, you can get a work visa in Australia with no worries and there's a heap of companies that are hiring engineers at the moment.

 

Hope that helps!

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