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blueoval56

Red Eagle Aviation

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Winnie I don't think I visited your school but it is refreshing to hear that someone did actually lay it on the line. As someone else mentioned, like Fire Fighting, this occupation has that "fun factor" that seems to attract a lot of people and is VERY competitive. I agree 100% that you have to really want it and work hard to overcome any obstacles. It took me a few years to find my way, pulling wrenches at first till I finally got my break. Hard work yes, but most importantly perseverance lets you attain your goals.

 

Cheers all !

 

W.

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Why can't the potential student do this research as well? They can google helicopter operators and get this information directly from the industry they want to join. Schools are there to teach and train to those that want their licence, the ones that try to help their students find employment do so as a added benefit. There are jobs for entry level pilots and the ones that put both the time and effort into it will get these jobs. The ones that sit back and wait for someone to bring the job to them or aren't willing to put some effort into it well they will end up a statistic that doesn't get work. If potential students don't do their due diligence to research potential employment they have no one but themselves to blame....period!h

 

 

Hard A$$! Lol! Why don't you tell us how you really feel. Made my day. Seriously wishing you a safe season bud.

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I heard Red Eagle was closing down for the time being until they work some TC/FAA paper work issue's.

 

Although sometimes I had wished I had gone through FAA licensing, Cheaper to get the IFR,Night, and ATPL.The FAA lets you get your ATPL on a R22 which makes life a lot easier when leaving the bush work and getting a job overseas. Also having the FAA lisence opens up more oppertunities overseas as well.

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Flying Helicopters is the single coolest job on the planet......period!.........,however,.......

 

It must consume you.......you must eat it, breath it and s*#t is a daily basis, not recently but from when you are young. You think it, dream it and share it constantly. You rent all the movies just because there is one on the jacket........You know all the makes and models, the latest and greatest..... and you know at least someone that is a Pilot. He/she is your hero. You must learn, you need to know what they know. It's your purpose and you fully understand complacency does not exist here.

 

Passion, ethics and skill awards you success..........

 

Choose a school that can hire you......

 

 

2cents

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Flying Helicopters is the single coolest job on the planet......period!.........,however,.......

 

 

Passion, ethics and skill awards you success..........

 

Choose a school that can hire you......

 

 

2cents

 

Funny...I just witnessed first hand, 4 students hired by two commercial operators, that came from a prominent B.C. flight school.

I think it gets overlooked that some of the flight schools, that have a very good and solid reputation within the industry, do get constant calls from operators looking for top students. High time/experienced working instructors ( read both VFR and IFR ), that stay active in the industry also provide good connections with chief pilots, owners, and Ops managers.....for any prospective student, look at the longevity of the school also.

Cheers.....H56. :)

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Great point Helilog56. I would agree completely, however, I have witnessed first hand a prominent school out east with high time working instructors and respected industry recognition provide less than ideal training.....

 

My best guess would be two fold...... they were pre-occupied running other venues of interest or simply forgot what is was like to learn?....... a momentary lapse in reason maybe......? unfortunately at the expense of their main customer........ the student.

 

 

2cents

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Great point Helilog56. I would agree completely, however, I have witnessed first hand a prominent school out east with high time working instructors and respected industry recognition provide less than ideal training.....

 

My best guess would be two fold...... they were pre-occupied running other venues of interest or simply forgot what is was like to learn?....... a momentary lapse in reason maybe......? unfortunately at the expense of their main customer........ the student.

 

 

2cents

 

I would give you more than 2 cents for that good point......sorry, I can't resist.....the best is out west!!! :)

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After doing my US commercial ride, the FAA examiner commented on the quality of training he sees in Canadian applicants and wished they could do a better job of it down there. Interesting in light of the previous Red Eagle discussions etc.

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After doing my US commercial ride, the FAA examiner commented on the quality of training he sees in Canadian applicants and wished they could do a better job of it down there. Interesting in light of the previous Red Eagle discussions etc.

 

I did my FAA checkride with Tim Tucker (Robinson chief pilot) in 2005. During the oral portion, he told me he'd never had a Canadian CPL(H) fail one of his checkrides. He jokingly said "don't be the first". I dunno if it was true or if it was just to put me at ease... :lol: He was also very impressed by Canadian standards (even Canadian private pilots doing the Robbie safety course impressed him with respect to other nationalities).

 

The checkride basically turned out to be a scenic tour of Long Beach and Compton (yuck) with a couple of autos thrown in for fun...

 

On the other hand, when I was ground instructing, we had a couple of people come through who'd done their licenses in the US and elsewhere wanting to convert to TC. It generally took them at least 10 hours of flight training to get the 30 exercises down pat, and long hours of preparation for the written (most places, like the US you can buy all of the current Q&A). Had one guy with an Aussi ticket with 2000 hours of "cattle mustering" who couldn't do a 360 on the tail or a properly coordinated standard rate turn while holding altitude. It took him 30 hours of training before he was recommended for his checkride, which he failed the first time. Kinda makes you think... :mellow:

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Foreign workers are one problem, the other problem is foreign students doing their training in canada and automatically getting a work visa when their training is done. These students generally have parents with deep pockets, and they will work virtually for free. (seems to happening in quebec) They should go home and apply just like any other immigrant. I am sure we have no shortage of low time canadian pilots. just out of flight school.

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