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Torque Value At 100% N2Nr


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I always heard that the torque should not exceed 30% (25-30) and also heard 32%, when the N2NR is at 100%, but an engineer told me that there is nowhere in any books about that, I looked quickly but couldn't find anything about that subject.

I heard guys say, never fly an aircraft that has over 30%, so I just want to get input from the crowd out there, and maybe someone can point me to a number, or a section where it describes it.

 

Thanks

 

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And the rule of thumb is simply a number which can tell you if the aircraft is set up as per the MM. I have seen one which was set up to 34% on the ground and would not autorotate,,,period. If it is set up to autorotate as per the MM then usually torque is 26% or so. You may see differences on the same machine with varied wind directions, temps, altitude etc. A rule of thumb can be used in various conditions but they are considered to be helpful things which are NOT found in manuals and provide you with guideline which precludes the necessity of complete test flight every time you get into a new to you aircraft. When in doubt do the auto checks but ensure the COM has allowances for pilot to do the test flight or authority obtained by Chief Pilot.

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It's a rough rule of thumb but can be useful if you know that before blade adjustments it was X% and after its not X% that it may be different.

 

Some gauges might not be that accurate on the lower end of the scale causing discrepancies between a/c.

 

It's also very important that your auto rev's aren't too high. If you're checking them down with the pole then they're too high and need to be set properly. The problem with too high rev's is that you won't have the collective travel at the bottom and won't be able to fully arrest the descent.

 

*If you ever have a doubt about the configuration of your machine talk to your engineer.

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Does the JR II have a chart for autorevs yet? We used to use the JRIII chart. There was some home built charts but when compared to the JR3 chart were no where near the same numbers. 2% rpm on a hot summer day makes a huge difference. Used to check the autorevs seasonally but with global warming now what ha ha.

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