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MeatServo

Accident In Saskatchewan?

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Any one of us who has flown for any amount of time has had their close calls and near misses. I know I have and I know so many others that have too. We've just been LUCKY that it remained a close call and didn't turn into this situation. Something similar could happen to anyone of us, we've all been there or could be there tomorrow. I've seen my most trusted customers/passengers do stupid moves once in a while. Ease up cause the next thread may be a bunch of internet losers picking apart your bad day at the office.

I just had one the other day....Geo walked right in front of machine as blades were coasting down. There was maybe 4 inches between his hard hat and the blades....Waaaaayyy too close and he heard about it in a hurry as did the rest of camp that evening and I've now altered my policy of where and when I'll shut down out here...LUCKY, YES. Now, if we knew what exactly happened in the bog in Saskatchewan,maybe I'd alter a few other things I do too when landing in swamps.

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What do you do in deep snow? Same technique, wait beside machine until it is clear.

 

Yup, and also tell your clients to depart outside the disc sideways while watching it to make sure it is clear... The departing to the front thing that is shown in many briefing cards and is included in many briefings in my opinion is wrong (except in certain circumstances where side egress is not possible such as pads on sidehills) in most situations. I saw an S76 card once that showed the front as a "Yellow" or caution area for approach and departure, not green as is shown in most others.... Every situation is different of course but pax seem awfully complacent sometimes as they walk away in the direction of the nose, which can be a hazardous direction to go... I once had some Mexicans depart UPHILL and they had to flatten themselves to the ground in order to get under the disc... then they smiled (all of them had gold teeth) at me through the rotor disc and gave me the thumbs up.... My adrenal glands were working well that day... But I immediately went back to the staging area and had the interpreter assist me in another briefing... Very scary...

 

HV

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I saw an S76 card once that showed the front as a "Yellow" or caution area for approach and departure, not green as is shown in most others....

HV

 

I'm not rated on the S76, but from what I've seen, I would think the front area would be red. Unless of course you're hauling smurfs... :P

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Off topic, but I'm confused as to why Global thought it was important to point out that their file photo of an AS350-B3 is "called 'L'Esprit d'Intertechnique 1997" ?

 

Surprised ? Nope. The media rarely get it right... :rolleyes: Probably some junior intern looked up AS350-B3 and stumbled upon a site talking about Eurocopter's 1997 attempt to fly from New York to Paris with a brand new B3 christened L'Esprit d'Intertechnique. I don't think they ever succeeded...

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I agree with HV on this one, and have changed my briefing to say only approach/depart from the side. I had a close call last summer, landed at the toe of a glacier with rough broken boulders to unload a bunch of gear. There was only one place level enough to land and it was close to a moraine sloping up under the front of the disc. The plan was for me to stay running and the crew unload the gear which was in both squirrel cheeks and the rear cargo. I briefed the crew right then before I let them out not to go uphill under any circumstance and to stay immediately in front going from one side to the other. They all understood and acknowledged. I actually said you will get killed if you walk uphill into the rotor and pointed it out... couldn't be more clear. Luckily it was level enough I was able to go to idle, lock the frictions, and I opened my door and undid my seat belt so I could lean out and watch buddy with the right cheek. When he was done he proceeded to walk straight up the moraine with me screaming. No use, I had to jump out and tackle him just as his head came within inches. If he had kept going it would have been over. It was pure luck the ship was at idle, my door was open and belt was off or else he'd be a goner. We both were shaking for quite awhile. It's hard because we have to trust people, but even intelligent well briefed people can do fatal things.

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I agree with HV on this one, and have changed my briefing to say only approach/depart from the side. I had a close call last summer, landed at the toe of a glacier with rough broken boulders to unload a bunch of gear. There was only one place level enough to land and it was close to a moraine sloping up under the front of the disc. The plan was for me to stay running and the crew unload the gear which was in both squirrel cheeks and the rear cargo. I briefed the crew right then before I let them out not to go uphill under any circumstance and to stay immediately in front going from one side to the other. They all understood and acknowledged. I actually said you will get killed if you walk uphill into the rotor and pointed it out... couldn't be more clear. Luckily it was level enough I was able to go to idle, lock the frictions, and I opened my door and undid my seat belt so I could lean out and watch buddy with the right cheek. When he was done he proceeded to walk straight up the moraine with me screaming. No use, I had to jump out and tackle him just as his head came within inches. If he had kept going it would have been over. It was pure luck the ship was at idle, my door was open and belt was off or else he'd be a goner. We both were shaking for quite awhile. It's hard because we have to trust people, but even intelligent well briefed people can do fatal things.

Amazing he would still do that after you told him numerous times. He would never fly with me again after that, I have only ever refused to fly one person after a flight. Sounds very lucky!

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I had a good one, medevac at Taseko Lake, patient was going to throw a stick of dynamite at back of the out house to scare his buddy, due to excess tequila consumption (10:00 am) he held the stick too long. Blew his hand and face off. We showed up with kids and a wailing woman running to the Jetranger (low gear) hands in the air, I jumped out and tackled the woman knocked her to the ground. Would have been 3 hands laying on the ground after this episode. (one was in miniature pieces) Sherwood was the dynamite dummies name, several jokes came from this, "Sherwood like to have my hand back!!" They did sow his face back on.

 

B.M.

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I had a good one, medevac at Taseko Lake, patient was going to throw a stick of dynamite at back of the out house to scare his buddy, due to excess tequila consumption (10:00 am) he held the stick too long. Blew his hand and face off. We showed up with kids and a wailing woman running to the Jetranger (low gear) hands in the air, I jumped out and tackled the woman knocked her to the ground. Would have been 3 hands laying on the ground after this episode. (one was in miniature pieces) Sherwood was the dynamite dummies name, several jokes came from this, "Sherwood like to have my hand back!!" They did sow his face back on.

 

B.M.

 

Gross...

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