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Carry-On Baggage Requirements


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Doesn't Mr. Lewis fly a Bell 206L1C30 equipped for Medivac? If you are so eager to help your industry "Lewis" why not add some constructive discussion to this forum, instead of wasting your time ridiculing me.

 

Where do you keep your flight manual and CFS, Lewis?

 

Is every single item in your cabin secured as per the standards of airworthiness specified in the basis of certification of the aircraft? If so, how? Have you received additional approvals? By the way duck tape isnt an approved method of securing items in the cabin...

 

What about the medics bag, how do you secure that?

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Under CARs 602.86, Can a passenger carry a purse on their lap in a 702/703 helicopter flight in Canada?   Carry-on Baggage, Equipment and Cargo   602.86 (1) No person shall operate an aircraft wit

I would say they have been enforcing it at 705 level (for passenger compartment anyway). The thing is, there is actually a Carry-on Baggage regulation in the 705 CARs. No such regulation exists in 702

I also cc'd your friend Richard Pierce on many of my recent requests for clarification...I know what really goes on in our industry...this is an issue we are discussing with our legal council.

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Calaiezzi admits he has operated contrary to regulations for quite some time. He also declares that he will continue to do so in the future.

 

He identifies several of his fellow operators who operate illegally in the same manner that he does.

 

He defends his actions as being standard operating procedure in the industry. This is laughable.

 

His threats of calling his lawyers do not frighten TC in the least.

 

If he does call his lawyers, if they are any good at all, they will advise him to immediately commence complying with the regulations or face the consequences.

Isn't the aircraft you fly the longranger in the attached picture with the red bag secured in the mid section seat by a seat belt???

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Thats It! The onus is now on all manufacturers to provide overhead bins large enough to store all the stuff we have on a daily basis in our cabins. Even better everyone would already be in the bent over crash position at all times. I see all kinds of safety benefits :lol:

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Here is a better picture of the red bag. It weighs 47 pounds and is secured only with the lap belt.

 

Underneath the foot of the stretcher are company manuals, the flight manual and a toolbox. All are unsecured. The CFS and some other items are kept in the cockpit and are unsecured.

 

These issues were brought to the attention of Rangeland Helicopters on at least two occasions and nothing has ever been done about them.

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Here is a better picture of the red bag. It weighs 47 pounds and is secured only with the lap belt.

 

Underneath the foot of the stretcher are company manuals, the flight manual and a toolbox. All are unsecured. The CFS and some other items are kept in the cockpit and are unsecured.

 

These issues were brought to the attention of Rangeland Helicopters on at least two occasions and nothing has ever been done about them.

 

So, in a nutshell, your operation is in the same situation as every other operation in Canada. So who's the pot calling the kettle black ? :P

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The sad part really is, that a few (A LOT) of these Inspectors from TC have actually worked IN THE INDUSTRY!

 

I don't really find it laudable that they are now going against what they themselves have done for many years, before getting on the high horse.

 

The Cabin Safety people are all airline people as well.... Never been in a helicopter I imagine, prior to joining TC.

 

I think it would be interesting to see HOW many pax/crew have actually been struck by loose items in the cabin.

 

Cheers

H.

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Here is a better picture of the red bag. It weighs 47 pounds and is secured only with the lap belt.

 

Underneath the foot of the stretcher are company manuals, the flight manual and a toolbox. All are unsecured. The CFS and some other items are kept in the cockpit and are unsecured.

 

These issues were brought to the attention of Rangeland Helicopters on at least two occasions and nothing has ever been done about them.

What's with the duct tape on the fwd upper stretcher rail?

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I'm no expert in the matter, but I see two categories of risk as far as carry-on items go: Those that could interfere with flight controls or crew, and loose items that could be projected in the cabin in the event of an accident.

 

As far as things that could interfere with flight controls, I agree there is no tolerance for that. For example, if I have a passenger in front that exits the aircraft and then I leave, I don't leave the headset on the hook right above the collective. I ask the passenger to trap it under his seatbelt (which of course he will fasten as he exits). The headsets in the rear I don't care. The worst that can happen if things get bumpy is they'll fall onto the seats.

 

With respect to loose items that could be projected in the event of an accident or inflight turbulence, if it's heavy (say more than 15lbs), they will be strapped down somehow. Either by a seatbelt, or if I'm doing a cargo run, by a cargo net. The kind of turbulence that would project a lightweight object in the cabin with enough force to cause injury would more than likely be catastrophic in a helicopter, to the point of causing a mid-air breakup. If that happens, no one's gonna live to tell about it anyways. In the case of an impact with terrain, the kind of rate of impact that would lead to these same items causing injury would not likely be survivable anyways.

 

Most survivable helicopter crashes are of the low forward velocity type, where at worst the machine will roll over on its side, or crumple on its tail. In these situations, I'd be much more preoccupied with the rotor blades or tranny coming through the cabin than grannie's purse... :mellow:

 

As has been stated here before, the elements of risk in helicopters have much more to do with what goes on when people are outside the machine than when they're inside. Helicopters don't generally flirt with the ground at 100 kt speeds or more...

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Hover exits are day to day practices in VFR helicopter operations. Customers exit the aircraft with chainsaws, geological equipment, medical packs and even their lunch all done in a hover. This whole issue is akin to Transport Canada enforcing seatbelt laws on school buses across Canada. If these kind of operations are in contravention with the published regs then helicopters are no longer a useful component in Canadian aviation.

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Hover exits are day to day practices in VFR helicopter operations. Customers exit the aircraft with chainsaws, geological equipment, medical packs and even their lunch all done in a hover. This whole issue is akin to Transport Canada enforcing seatbelt laws on school buses across Canada. If these kind of operations are in contravention with the published regs then helicopters are no longer a useful component in Canadian aviation.

 

That pretty much sums it all up .....

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