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Spliting The Cost Of Hour Building For Faa Atp 50Hrs Night & Instrument

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I was wondering if anybody would be interested in splitting on the cost of hour building towards an FAA ATP. I need around 50-60 hours night and 25 simulated instrument. The flying would have to all be night/simulated instrument which requires a safety pilot so legally both pilots can log PIC under FAA Regs. To be legally allowed to fly FAA aircraft all that has to be done is fill out a form based on a commercial or private licence to get a FAA PPL based of a foreign licence which takes 30-90days and a flight review to validate the licence. No exams or flight test. To apply for the ATP licence it can also be based on a foreign Commercial with instrument rating, and another verification must be done for that application plus TSA approval and SEVIS registration.

 

Right now I am looking in Washington state Bellingham area to do the hour building. But open to other areas.The flying would have to be done in May and looking at flying at least 4-5hrs per night. the cost of renting a helicopter is around $240-$300 p/hr. 50hrs PIC would cost Maximum $7500 per pilot.

 

Anybody interested let me know.

 

 

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Glacier Aviation may be able to help you.

 

http://www.helicopterflightschool.com/helicopter-training.htm

 

They have a base in Skagit WA. You do the foreign license verification to get a private license. BUT in the States there is an SFAR for Robbies, which means some training required to meet the SFAR. Going that far, its not much more work to get a stand alone commercial FAA license. Second round of foreign license verification, written exam, 3 hours training (including SFAR), and flight test. I had a good experience with Glacier when I did my FAA Commercial.

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I also did some training with Glacier at Olympia...good people, decent rates. If you're already rated on a Robbie in Canada (or elsewhere) then you won't need anything further to satisfy the SFAR.

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Student Pilots - What you need...

Prior to manipulating R22/44 controls - Awareness training - 1st endorsement

Pre-Solo

  • SFAR Flight Training within preceeding 90 days
  • 20 hours dual
  • Awareness Training - recommended - 2nd endorsement

Prior to acting as PIC

  • SFAR Flight Training
  • Awareness Training - recommended
Existing Pilots - What you need...

R22 Checkouts: Awareness Training prior to manipulating the controls then...

Pilots less than 200 hours total helicopter / 50 hours R22

  • SFAR Flight Training
  • 10 hours dual instruction
  • Special Annual flight review in an R22

Pilots with more than 200hr total helicopter / 50 hours R22

  • Biennial flight review in an R22

R44 Checkouts: Awareness Training prior to manipulating the controls then...

Pilots less than 200 hours total helicopter / 50 hours R44 (25 hrs R22 can be credited to the 50hr requirement)

  • SFAR Flight Training
  • 10 hours dual instruction in a Robinson Helicopter
  • 5 hours dual instruction in an R44
  • Special Annual flight review in an R44

Pilots less than 200 hours total helicopter / 50 hours R44 (25 hrs R22 can be credited to the 50hr requirement)

  • Biennial flight review in an R44

 

When I went from Private FAA to Commercial FAA and had all the times covered above, I still had to get the SFAR endorsement. The examiner checked that I had the endorsement in my logbook before we went flying. It, admittedly, is not easy to decipher, so I quoted a simplified example above. My TC license was endorsed 22 and 44 with 600 hours on those types.

 

I suggest getting clarification from the "Americans".

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Just something for you to think about... You probaly won't learn any bush flying skills going to the states to fly an R22, but with a private license, it might be worth putting the time towards an instrument rating down there. I don't how that converts to a TC ifr rating though. It might be something to look at.

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Thanks Hazy,

 

I got enough bush time, working overseas and looking back now I wish I had done the IFR and Night in the US. I would have saved a bunch of money. The reason I want the FAA ATP is a few of the Canadians I work with have applied for jobs in Asia etc and now regret not getting the FAA. The FAA licence is much easier to deal with and preferred and easier to keep current overseas. Which can mean getting the job or not. My TC instrument has expired and no PPC for over a year.With the FAA in the country I work now I could keep it current every 6 months on our sim check rides.

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